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Stanford Achievement Test

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
New laptop computers. Kid-friendly furniture. Books for classroom libraries. White boards to replace dusty blackboards. These are among the myriad ways that California public schools plan to spend the $227 million in taxpayer-funded rewards that will soon begin flowing under Gov. Gray Davis' school accountability program. Today, the California Department of Education will post on its Web site the list of 4,502 schools that will receive this windfall, along with the amount each will get.
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NEWS
January 14, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's massive standardized testing program is having some unintended effects both in and outside the classroom, results that have little to do with lawmakers' goals of improving education and boosting accountability. At some schools, teachers have students read short passages instead of entire books because that's what's on the test. At other schools, lessons on science and social studies have been abandoned to make more time for drilling on test-related material.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Fullerton School District informed the state that it has disciplined an elementary school teacher whose class had an unusually high number of erasures on a standardized test, changing answers from wrong to right. A school board member said last month that an employee at Commonwealth Elementary School was being investigated for helping students change the answers. The eight-paragraph letter from Supt.
NEWS
November 21, 2000
Ending a two-year legal battle, the San Francisco Unified School District has agreed to give the Stanford 9 achievement test next spring to thousands of students who are not yet fluent in English. The change of heart, part of a settlement announced last week, followed a promise by the state Board of Education to clarify a regulation about testing exemptions.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
The State Board of Education on Thursday adopted new regulations that require schools to give the Stanford 9 exam later in the year so students spend more time in the classroom before facing the exam. The change will cause headaches for many districts, forcing them to rearrange intricate schedules and seek new dates for other tests, such as the Golden State exams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
At Bandini Elementary School in Commerce, teachers regularly give multiple choice quizzes that look just like the Stanford 9. Instructors pore over test results instead of shoving them into desk drawers as they once did. And the lowest-scoring students get daily tutoring. Miles away, at Orange Grove Middle School in Hacienda Heights, teachers use many of the same strategies.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Flawed and inconsistent data are creating headaches for state education officials as they attempt to sort out which schools will qualify for big payouts based on improvements in Stanford 9 test scores. The state had hoped to issue the eagerly awaited results on Sept. 26 but has pushed the date to Oct. 4. The problems raise questions about the reliability of the state's fledgling accountability program, which determines how the state will distribute hundreds of millions of dollars in rewards.
NEWS
September 4, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the new school year gets underway this week, 431 low-performing campuses statewide are taking a chance on a program that gives them money to raise test scores but also promises sanctions if they fail to show significant progress. These schools have volunteered for a plan that labels them "underperforming" but offers $96 million in aid to improve academic achievement. By doing so, they have placed themselves at the center of California's nascent accountability system.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | TARIQ MALIK and ERIKA I. RITCHIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County students posted moderate increases in their SAT scores this year, and in at least one district they showed substantial gains over the previous year, the College Board reported Tuesday. In the Fullerton Joint Union High School District, which has six traditional high schools in Fullerton, La Habra and Buena Park, students earned an average total score of 1108--536 in verbal and 572 in mathematics--up 25 points from scores in the previous school year.
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