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Stanford Achievement Test

NEWS
August 15, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California students who are not proficient in English improved their scores on the Stanford 9 standardized test at about the same rate as their fluent classmates, but new state data released Monday continue to show an immense disparity between the two groups. Broken out by fluency, the test results highlight the stark reality that there are two distinct levels of learning and achievement in the state.
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NEWS
July 31, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
With California's youngest students showing progress, state officials and education experts say the state's middle schools, which have stagnated, need to be the next focus of school reform. The need for change is evident in this year's Stanford 9 scores. Results for primary school students showed significant gains, whereas scores in the middle grades only inched up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Berta Cochario isn't panicking yet. But the principal of Betty Plasencia Elementary School knows the pressure will soon be on to explain the lackluster performance of her campus on the Stanford 9 tests. The severely crowded school just north of downtown is struggling to improve its overall score, which crept up 1.7 percentage points on scores released Monday but is still down 2.4 percentage points from 1998, the first year of statewide testing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000
Test results published in The Times on Tuesday failed to include charter schools. The chart below provides scores for those schools as measured by the percentage of students at or above the 50th percentile, which is the national average. The change in scores is the percentage of students who moved up or down in the rankings since 1998. The last two columns show the average percentage of language arts questions answered correctly and the change from 1999's average percentage.
NEWS
July 18, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California public school students improved their performance on the third annual Stanford 9 exam, with second- and third-graders racking up the most impressive gains, the state Education Department reported Monday. A majority of students statewide achieved the national average in two key subject areas: language skills and math, where students posted the biggest gains and best scores overall.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
This year The Times is publishing school results for the statewide Stanford 9 tests as the percentages of students at or above the 50th percentile ranks, which are the national averages for specific test subjects and grades. Previously, The Times published schools' mean percentile ranks, which are schools' rankings in comparison with those of other schools nationwide. The California Department of Education provides three other measures to choose from as well.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
* UNDERSTANDING THE NUMBERS / READING THE TABLES In California, almost 4.3 million public school students in grades two through 11 took the Stanford 9 standardized tests this spring--for the third year in a row. All of them were tested in reading, math and language skills such as grammar and punctuation. Students through eighth grade also took a spelling test, and students in higher grades took exams in science and history/social science.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
In California, almost 4.3 million public school students in grades 2 through 11 took the Stanford 9 standardized tests this spring for the third year in a row. All of them were tested in reading and math. Students through Grade 8 also took a spelling test, and students in higher grades took exams in science and history / social science. In this section, The Times presents scores from selected subjects and from three "bellwether" grades: fourth, eighth and 10th.
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