Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStanford Achievement Test
IN THE NEWS

Stanford Achievement Test

NEWS
May 24, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES and JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Scattered resistance to California's Stanford 9 testing program is popping up statewide as teachers, parents and students protest a system that they say values test scores over actual learning. At the tiny Santa Monica Alternative School House, parents of more than 60% of students in second through eighth grades chose not to let their children take the test this month, saying they considered it a waste of time.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001
Nearly 530,000 teachers, administrators, custodians and other school employees across California will receive cash bonuses of almost $600 because their campuses significantly boosted test scores, state officials announced this week. The one-time rewards will reach employees at 4,502 schools--more than half of the state's campuses--as early as next month. Every employee at the schools will receive money under the $350-million program, known as the School Site Employee Performance Bonus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001 | From Times staff and wire reports
A new study commissioned by the California Teachers Assn. confirms what educators have long known about student achievement: Schools with mostly economically and linguistically disadvantaged students perform at far lower levels than those with affluent children. The study examined how schools statewide fared on California's new Academic Performance Index, which ranks campuses on the basis of their Stanford 9 test scores.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
About 300 low-ranked schools that showed extraordinary gains in Stanford 9 scores will divide up a $100-million state pot designed to reward teachers and principals, according to a list unveiled Thursday by the California Department of Education. Those schools represent fewer than one-quarter of the 1,346 schools statewide that met the criteria for the big-money rewards--which has generated consternation among critics of the governor's award program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
New laptop computers. Kid-friendly furniture. Books for classroom libraries. White boards to replace dusty blackboards. These are among the myriad ways that California public schools plan to spend the $227 million in taxpayer-funded rewards that will soon begin flowing under Gov. Gray Davis' school accountability program. Today, the California Department of Education will post on its Web site the list of 4,502 schools that will receive this windfall, along with the amount each will get.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's massive standardized testing program is having some unintended effects both in and outside the classroom, results that have little to do with lawmakers' goals of improving education and boosting accountability. At some schools, teachers have students read short passages instead of entire books because that's what's on the test. At other schools, lessons on science and social studies have been abandoned to make more time for drilling on test-related material.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Fullerton School District informed the state that it has disciplined an elementary school teacher whose class had an unusually high number of erasures on a standardized test, changing answers from wrong to right. A school board member said last month that an employee at Commonwealth Elementary School was being investigated for helping students change the answers. The eight-paragraph letter from Supt.
NEWS
November 21, 2000
Ending a two-year legal battle, the San Francisco Unified School District has agreed to give the Stanford 9 achievement test next spring to thousands of students who are not yet fluent in English. The change of heart, part of a settlement announced last week, followed a promise by the state Board of Education to clarify a regulation about testing exemptions.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
The State Board of Education on Thursday adopted new regulations that require schools to give the Stanford 9 exam later in the year so students spend more time in the classroom before facing the exam. The change will cause headaches for many districts, forcing them to rearrange intricate schedules and seek new dates for other tests, such as the Golden State exams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
At Bandini Elementary School in Commerce, teachers regularly give multiple choice quizzes that look just like the Stanford 9. Instructors pore over test results instead of shoving them into desk drawers as they once did. And the lowest-scoring students get daily tutoring. Miles away, at Orange Grove Middle School in Hacienda Heights, teachers use many of the same strategies.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|