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Stanford Achievement Tests

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1998 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
As she scanned her district's much-anticipated test scores, the assistant superintendent for Santa Monica schools was pleased at first to see above-average reading scores, building to a better than respectable ranking in the 63rd percentile in the eighth grade. Then came the precipice. By the second year of high school, the students were scoring in the 44th percentile, marking an astonishing drop of 19 points. "Everything looked so good on the way up," said Sue Gee. "It's surprising."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Van Nuys High School leading the way, San Fernando Valley schools posted some of the top scores in Los Angeles on the 1999-2000 SAT, according to statistics released last week. Van Nuys boasted the highest SAT scores in the 723,000-student Los Angeles Unified School District, averaging 536 on the verbal portion and 559 in math. "We are very, very proud of our students," said Herman Clay, principal of Van Nuys High.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Van Nuys High School leading the way, San Fernando Valley schools posted some of the top scores in Los Angeles on the 1999-2000 SAT, according to statistics released last week. Van Nuys boasted the highest SAT scores in the 723,000-student Los Angeles Unified School District, averaging 536 on the verbal portion and 559 in math. "We are very, very proud of our students," said Herman Clay, principal of Van Nuys High.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Curious about how well your 16-year-old has mastered "geometry from a synthetic perspective"? Or is your burning desire for information focused more on "geometry from an algebraic perspective"? Fret not. A little bit of insight on those two questions and many more will show up in a report from your son or daughter's school, arriving in the mailbox or your kid's backpack sometime before the end of July. Be warned, though.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Curious about how well your 16-year-old has mastered "geometry from a synthetic perspective"? Or is your burning desire for information focused more on "geometry from an algebraic perspective"? Fret not. A little bit of insight on those two questions and many more will show up in a report from your son or daughter's school, arriving in the mailbox or your kid's backpack sometime before the end of July. Be warned, though.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1997
The Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition, was given for the first time in the Los Angeles Unified School District last spring to 363,612 students in grades 1-10. The Aprenda was given to 122,451 Spanish-speaking students in grades 1-10. Both are nationally normed tests, with scores expressed in median percentiles, which represent the results for the middle-scoring student in relationship to students across the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1999 | Martha Groves
Accountability is coming to school districts across California, and the state wants struggling schools to know about funds available to help pay for new educational resources. But there's a hitch. State schools chief Delaine Eastin last week sent letters to districts telling them which schools can apply for the grants. A school is eligible if its overall results from the Stanford 9 achievement tests place it in the lower half of the statewide distribution for both 1998 and 1999.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
Eight teachers at Woodland High School just outside Sacramento are under investigation after allegations they shared a standardized state science test with students preparing to take the exam. The Woodland Joint Unified School District announced Wednesday that the teachers have been placed on paid administrative leave while the charges are investigated. "As a district, we are shocked, appalled and tremendously disappointed in the unethical conduct of a few employees," said Supt. Linda Weesner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1994 | ANGELA S. MILLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The students gather outside their classroom door and chant an ancient Hawaiian poem: "Ku mai nei au i ka halau loa a 'i." They respectfully tell their teacher of their desire for learning and ask for permission to enter the place of instruction. The teacher answers, "Au mai e na Lehua a," or "Come forth, my young Lehua blossoms," and the eager students file into the classroom. This scene repeats itself each school-day morning at seven public schools across Hawaii where hundreds of elementary schoolchildren are taught exclusively through the Hawaiian language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, teacher Lori Musick would have told you that California's standardized testing program was fundamentally wrong, a scourge on children and teachers. Today, Musick's documentary "Put to the Test: Are California's Schools Making the Grade?" will air on KOCE, Orange County's public broadcasting affiliate, and suggest that the Stanford 9 test and the high school exit exam may not be so bad after all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1998 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
As she scanned her district's much-anticipated test scores, the assistant superintendent for Santa Monica schools was pleased at first to see above-average reading scores, building to a better than respectable ranking in the 63rd percentile in the eighth grade. Then came the precipice. By the second year of high school, the students were scoring in the 44th percentile, marking an astonishing drop of 19 points. "Everything looked so good on the way up," said Sue Gee. "It's surprising."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1997
The Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition, was given for the first time in the Los Angeles Unified School District last spring to 363,612 students in grades 1-10. The Aprenda was given to 122,451 Spanish-speaking students in grades 1-10. Both are nationally normed tests, with scores expressed in median percentiles, which represent the results for the middle-scoring student in relationship to students across the country.
OPINION
April 25, 1999 | W. JAMES POPHAM, W. James Popham, an emeritus professor in the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, is a former president of the American Educational Research Assn. He is the author of more than 20 books, many of which are devoted to educational testing
American educators are experiencing enormous pressure these days to improve students' scores on standardized tests. Yet, in attempting to boost test scores, increasing numbers of teachers are preparing their students in ways that are educationally unsound and, in some instances, downright dishonest. What is especially troubling about such indefensible test preparation is that it stems from two incorrect assumptions.
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Students who participated in the state's class size reduction program fared modestly better on last spring's state reading and mathematics tests than those who did not, according to data released Monday. In third grade, for instance, 41% of students in classes limited to 20 pupils scored at or above the national average in reading, compared with 33% in larger classes, preliminary analysis of statewide test data shows.
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