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Stanford Center For International Security And Arms Control

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NEWS
December 1, 1988
Former astronaut Sally Ride may be the next big name to quit the nation's top arms control center, putting pressure on Stanford University to change its policy on professorial appointments. Ride has refused all requests for interviews since joining the Stanford Center for International Security and Arms Control last year. But she did give a colleague, nuclear scientist Theodore Postol, permission to talk on her behalf.
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NEWS
December 1, 1988
Former astronaut Sally Ride may be the next big name to quit the nation's top arms control center, putting pressure on Stanford University to change its policy on professorial appointments. Ride has refused all requests for interviews since joining the Stanford Center for International Security and Arms Control last year. But she did give a colleague, nuclear scientist Theodore Postol, permission to talk on her behalf.
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NEWS
November 29, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
In a move that could weaken the nation's ability to groom the experts needed for international arms control, physicist Sidney Drell abruptly resigned Monday as a co-director of the Stanford Center for International Security and Arms Control. Drell, one of the nation's top arms control experts and an internationally known scientist, quit his post because the university has balked at allowing the center to make appointments with the rank of professor.
NEWS
November 29, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
In a move that could weaken the nation's ability to groom the experts needed for international arms control, physicist Sidney Drell abruptly resigned Monday as a co-director of the Stanford Center for International Security and Arms Control. Drell, one of the nation's top arms control experts and an internationally known scientist, quit his post because the university has balked at allowing the center to make appointments with the rank of professor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1988
Physicist Sidney Drell is not the only teacher at Stanford University with a passionate commitment to sharing knowledge he regards as important to the world. But he is the only one who has resigned because the Stanford bureaucracy could not find a way to give professors in arms control the same sort of academic standing that they could get, say, in history or law.
NEWS
September 29, 1985 | From Associated Press
An arms expert warned that "superfires" ignited by a nuclear attack on U.S. cities could cause two to four times as many deaths as current government estimates. Between 36 million and 56 million people would die--far more than the 15 million projected in standard government studies--if one-megaton bombs were dropped on 100 U.S. cities, according to Theodore A. Postol of the Stanford Center for International Security and Arms Control.
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Former CIA Director William E. Colby said Thursday that the verification provisions in the new U.S.-Soviet treaty banning ground-based intermediate-range nuclear missiles amount to a "remarkable breakthrough" in arms control negotiations. Appearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, he called for ratification of the pact "by a resounding vote without harassing amendments."
NEWS
January 7, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Britain and the United States developed and began to manufacture deadly anthrax bombs for use against Germany in World War II, but never decided to use them, according to a new report by a Stanford University historian. Prof. Barton J. Bernstein declared in an interview and in an article in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists published Monday that an American plant, "probably in Vigo County" near Terre Haute, Ind.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Clinton Administration first considered William J. Perry for a top Defense Department job a little more than a year ago, the low-key Stanford University engineering professor seemed the perfect choice--for the Pentagon's No. 2 slot. The quiet-spoken mathematician was regarded as a careful manager, capable of running the day-to-day operations of a huge department. He was a recognized authority on crucial issues, such as military technology and arms control.
NEWS
June 8, 1985 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists across the country seem more and more obsessed these days with what one distinguished physicist described as "a subject almost totally devoid of the hope, optimism and beauty of science." Sidney D. Drell, co-director of the Stanford Center for International Security and Arms Control, used that expression in describing one of the dominant themes haunting the scientific community.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers at Rockwell International and Texas Instruments working on the "Star Wars" defense program have developed ultra-high-speed computers the size of a deck of cards that they say could have far-reaching commercial applications. Besides representing an important advance in Star Wars research, the small machines--about 500 times faster than the average personal computer--could spark a new generation of small but powerful computers for consumers, industry watchers said Wednesday.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
A task force headed by astronaut Sally K. Ride suggested Monday that the United States move toward building a permanent outpost on the moon as a way station toward the ultimate objective of "exploring, prospecting and settling Mars." The long-awaited report, ordered as a part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's effort to recover from the devastation of the January, 1986, Challenger disaster, was delivered to NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher last week and released Monday.
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