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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
Robert L. Brosio, a retired federal prosecutor who supervised high-profile cases that included those against bank swindler Charles Keating Jr. and Los Angeles police officers who were involved in the beating of Rodney King, has died. He was 77. Brosio, who for 28 years led the criminal division of the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles, had a massive pulmonary embolism in February, his daughter Serena Brosio said. He died Friday at a Pasadena hospital. While he seldom argued cases in court himself, Brosio was in charge of more than 100 prosecutors and set a standard of "ramrod integrity," said Nora Manella, an associate justice of the California Court of Appeal in Los Angeles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rap star Ice-T, who has given artistic voice to the gang members of South-Central Los Angeles, visited Stanford Law School during the weekend and warned of renewed violence as long as African- Americans are denied equal justice. Displaying a quick sense of humor and a steady stream of profanity, Ice-T ripped the U.S. Constitution, compared President Clinton to a smooth-talking car salesman and defended his "Cop Killer" song that prompted protests last year from police and politicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- Abbot Archimandrite Theodor Micka was awakened on Tuesday morning by his fellow priests with some good news. Gov. Jerry Brown had signed legislation allowing the ailing 76-year-old abbot, who has terminal cancer, to be buried on the grounds of his Alameda County monastery. “I'm in really high spirits now," Micka said in a phone interview. Despite ongoing chemotherapy, he said, "I have strength that is almost superhuman this morning.” Micka has spent decades developing an Orthodox Christian monastery in Castro Valley, buying the first plot of land in 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
Robert L. Brosio, a retired federal prosecutor who supervised high-profile cases that included those against bank swindler Charles Keating Jr. and Los Angeles police officers who were involved in the beating of Rodney King, has died. He was 77. Brosio, who for 28 years led the criminal division of the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles, had a massive pulmonary embolism in February, his daughter Serena Brosio said. He died Friday at a Pasadena hospital. While he seldom argued cases in court himself, Brosio was in charge of more than 100 prosecutors and set a standard of "ramrod integrity," said Nora Manella, an associate justice of the California Court of Appeal in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- President Obama has selected two lawyers from the same California firm -- a former federal prosecutor and a corporate attorney who helped challenge Proposition 8 -- to fill openings on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. John B. Owens, 41, a litigation partner in the Los Angeles office of Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP, and Michelle T. Friedland, 41, a litigation partner in the firm's San Francisco office, must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate before joining the San Francisco-based 9th Circuit, which hears appeals from California and eight other Western states.
NEWS
February 14, 1991
Carl B. Spaeth, dean of the Stanford Law School from 1946 to 1962 who founded the first of the school's three law reviews while broadening its economic base, has died of pneumonia at a convalescent home in Northern California. He was 83 when he died Sunday in Menlo Park after a series of illnesses. A noted internationalist, Spaeth also served in the State Department from 1940 until 1946, when he went to Stanford. He also was general counsel of the Venezuelan Development Corp. in Caracas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
After six years of working at prestigious law firms, Daniel Friedland jumped ship, took a big pay cut and joined the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. "It's important for me to be involved in public service," said the 31-year-old Friedland, who has been prosecuting misdemeanor drunk driving, assault and battery cases at courthouses across the county. "Working for the D.A.'s office is a great way to make a difference, and I wanted to make a difference in the town I grew up in."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- Abbot Archimandrite Theodor Micka was awakened on Tuesday morning by his fellow priests with some good news. Gov. Jerry Brown had signed legislation allowing the ailing 76-year-old abbot, who has terminal cancer, to be buried on the grounds of his Alameda County monastery. “I'm in really high spirits now," Micka said in a phone interview. Despite ongoing chemotherapy, he said, "I have strength that is almost superhuman this morning.” Micka has spent decades developing an Orthodox Christian monastery in Castro Valley, buying the first plot of land in 1979.
OPINION
July 2, 2005
One fact sums up Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's pivotal role on the Supreme Court and the enormity of her resignation -- she alone was in the majority of every one of the court's 13 5-4 decisions this last term. The Democrats' genuine sorrow in seeing O'Connor leave 24 years after being picked by President Reagan is a tribute to her moderating influence. Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada, the minority leader, urged President Bush on Friday to appoint someone else "like O'Connor" to the court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Jack Leonard
More than 1,000 inmates previously sentenced to life in prison have been freed since voters approved changes to California's three-strikes law in November, with only a handful charged with new offenses since their release, according to a report released Monday. The authors of the report , who helped write and campaign for the ballot initiative, said third-strikers released under Proposition 36 have a lower recidivism rate than other prisoners freed on parole, helping save the state millions of dollars by opening up space in crowded prisons without jeopardizing public safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- President Obama has selected two lawyers from the same California firm -- a former federal prosecutor and a corporate attorney who helped challenge Proposition 8 -- to fill openings on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. John B. Owens, 41, a litigation partner in the Los Angeles office of Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP, and Michelle T. Friedland, 41, a litigation partner in the firm's San Francisco office, must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate before joining the San Francisco-based 9th Circuit, which hears appeals from California and eight other Western states.
OPINION
March 23, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
A friend of mine had his name in the paper the other day. It was in an article speculating about who might inherit a prestigious post in the literary world when the current grandee retires. The article said that my friend would have led the list 10 years ago. Ouch! The obvious though unstated implication is that now he's too old. He just turned 60. He says he already has his dream job and didn't mind the idea that, because he is 60, some career opportunities have moved beyond his reach.
OPINION
September 25, 2011 | By Meg Waite Clayton
After his first argument before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, one prominent Southern lawyer was certain the Supreme Court would rule in his favor — because, he said, she was "flirting" with him. The comment speaks volumes about the speaker, but it also says something about the person who weaved her way through a male-dominated world to become the first female justice 30 years ago today, and served 25 years on the court. O'Connor wasn't chosen because she looked the part, but the fact that her pearls and lavender suits with skirts wouldn't alarm the public wasn't inconsequential.
OPINION
May 13, 2010
Kagan on the court? Re "Kagan is picked for high court," May 10 Elena Kagan, the president's nominee for the Supreme Court, has the least amount of experience of any nominee in the last three decades. Her judicial experience is zero, as is her real-world experience. President Obama appointed her as solicitor general, where she once argued that the federal government has the power to ban certain books and pamphlets. Responding to this argument for the majority of the court, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote, "As a free-floating test for 1st Amendment coverage, that idea is startling and dangerous."
OPINION
November 25, 2006 | Martin Kimel, MARTIN KIMEL is a government lawyer in Washington.
ONE OF MY OLD law school classmates pledged at least $250,000 to Stanford Law School this year. Another gave at least $100,000, and 12 others donated $10,000 or more apiece. Then there's Philip H. Knight, the founder of Nike, who pledged $100 million as the lead gift for a new, $250-million campus for his alma mater, the Stanford Graduate School of Business. I too feel privileged to have attended Stanford.
OPINION
September 25, 2011 | By Meg Waite Clayton
After his first argument before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, one prominent Southern lawyer was certain the Supreme Court would rule in his favor — because, he said, she was "flirting" with him. The comment speaks volumes about the speaker, but it also says something about the person who weaved her way through a male-dominated world to become the first female justice 30 years ago today, and served 25 years on the court. O'Connor wasn't chosen because she looked the part, but the fact that her pearls and lavender suits with skirts wouldn't alarm the public wasn't inconsequential.
OPINION
November 25, 2006 | Martin Kimel, MARTIN KIMEL is a government lawyer in Washington.
ONE OF MY OLD law school classmates pledged at least $250,000 to Stanford Law School this year. Another gave at least $100,000, and 12 others donated $10,000 or more apiece. Then there's Philip H. Knight, the founder of Nike, who pledged $100 million as the lead gift for a new, $250-million campus for his alma mater, the Stanford Graduate School of Business. I too feel privileged to have attended Stanford.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
After six years of working at prestigious law firms, Daniel Friedland jumped ship, took a big pay cut and joined the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. "It's important for me to be involved in public service," said the 31-year-old Friedland, who has been prosecuting misdemeanor drunk driving, assault and battery cases at courthouses across the county. "Working for the D.A.'s office is a great way to make a difference, and I wanted to make a difference in the town I grew up in."
OPINION
July 2, 2005
One fact sums up Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's pivotal role on the Supreme Court and the enormity of her resignation -- she alone was in the majority of every one of the court's 13 5-4 decisions this last term. The Democrats' genuine sorrow in seeing O'Connor leave 24 years after being picked by President Reagan is a tribute to her moderating influence. Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada, the minority leader, urged President Bush on Friday to appoint someone else "like O'Connor" to the court.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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