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Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2000
Provided by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the SLAC Virtual Visitor Center is an outstanding educational resource for those interested in the science of accelerators and particle physics. The site teaches visitors about various accelerator components and how they work, the current theory of fundamental particles and applications of high-energy physics research. This site is clear, informative and comprehensive.http://www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc/home.html
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Wolfgang "Pief" Panofsky, the nuclear physicist and brilliant administrator who was the driving force for the creation of Stanford University's 2-mile-long linear electron accelerator, made crucial discoveries about the nature of the neutral pi meson, advised three presidents about science and was a powerful proponent of nuclear arms control, died of a heart attack Monday at his home in Los Altos, Calif. He was 88.
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NEWS
July 30, 1986
Stanford University workers criticized the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for "using convicted felons to spy on employees." An ex-felon, planted as an informant, was arrested along with three center workers on suspicion of grand theft and receiving stolen property. Two employees also were arrested on suspicion of possessing cocaine. The property, which included computer parts and scrap metal, was all "small stuff," said San Mateo County Sheriff's Lt. Alan Johnson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2000
Provided by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the SLAC Virtual Visitor Center is an outstanding educational resource for those interested in the science of accelerators and particle physics. The site teaches visitors about various accelerator components and how they work, the current theory of fundamental particles and applications of high-energy physics research. This site is clear, informative and comprehensive.http://www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc/home.html
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1993
In a Campus Correspondence column (Opinion, Jan. 10), Stanford senior Heather Willens discusses the excessive fraction of the nation's research and development budget that is spent for defense-related research. While I agree that this fraction is indeed too high, I must correct her misapprehension about the nature of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. I, and many others on the staff, would not choose to work here if indeed it were a laboratory devoted to defense-oriented nuclear research.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Staggered by a five-year slump in which the state has failed to attract major new science projects and has lost thousands of high-technology jobs, California is fighting to hang on to the latest major federal research project--an antimatter research center that originated in the Bay Area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Wolfgang "Pief" Panofsky, the nuclear physicist and brilliant administrator who was the driving force for the creation of Stanford University's 2-mile-long linear electron accelerator, made crucial discoveries about the nature of the neutral pi meson, advised three presidents about science and was a powerful proponent of nuclear arms control, died of a heart attack Monday at his home in Los Altos, Calif. He was 88.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A radically new type of atom smasher that has been giving nightmares to its creators at Stanford University has been shut down temporarily so that major modifications can be completed. The $115-million Stanford Linear Collider, designed to hurl electrons and positrons into each other at nearly the speed of light, will be out of service until at least the end of October, according to Michael Riordan, a physicist and spokesman for the collider project.
NEWS
August 14, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A fierce rivalry in the esoteric world of high-energy physics is drawing to a close, but not before scientists who have devoted years of their lives to a bold gamble claim at least a partial victory. The Stanford Linear Accelerator will probably never live up to the full expectations of its creator, Nobel laureate Burton Richter, and in the months ahead the pleasure of announcing major developments in particle physics will go mostly to scientists at other facilities.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, more than a year behind schedule, are struggling to make one of the more sophisticated scientific instruments ever built work for more than a few minutes at a time. Although the Stanford Linear Collider was supposed to have started producing an elusive subatomic particle called the "Z" in the spring of 1987, it has so far failed to capture even one.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Staggered by a five-year slump in which the state has failed to attract major new science projects and has lost thousands of high-technology jobs, California is fighting to hang on to the latest major federal research project--an antimatter research center that originated in the Bay Area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1993
In a Campus Correspondence column (Opinion, Jan. 10), Stanford senior Heather Willens discusses the excessive fraction of the nation's research and development budget that is spent for defense-related research. While I agree that this fraction is indeed too high, I must correct her misapprehension about the nature of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. I, and many others on the staff, would not choose to work here if indeed it were a laboratory devoted to defense-oriented nuclear research.
NEWS
August 14, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A fierce rivalry in the esoteric world of high-energy physics is drawing to a close, but not before scientists who have devoted years of their lives to a bold gamble claim at least a partial victory. The Stanford Linear Accelerator will probably never live up to the full expectations of its creator, Nobel laureate Burton Richter, and in the months ahead the pleasure of announcing major developments in particle physics will go mostly to scientists at other facilities.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A radically new type of atom smasher that has been giving nightmares to its creators at Stanford University has been shut down temporarily so that major modifications can be completed. The $115-million Stanford Linear Collider, designed to hurl electrons and positrons into each other at nearly the speed of light, will be out of service until at least the end of October, according to Michael Riordan, a physicist and spokesman for the collider project.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, more than a year behind schedule, are struggling to make one of the more sophisticated scientific instruments ever built work for more than a few minutes at a time. Although the Stanford Linear Collider was supposed to have started producing an elusive subatomic particle called the "Z" in the spring of 1987, it has so far failed to capture even one.
NEWS
July 30, 1986
Stanford University workers criticized the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for "using convicted felons to spy on employees." An ex-felon, planted as an informant, was arrested along with three center workers on suspicion of grand theft and receiving stolen property. Two employees also were arrested on suspicion of possessing cocaine. The property, which included computer parts and scrap metal, was all "small stuff," said San Mateo County Sheriff's Lt. Alan Johnson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stanford University's Linear Accelerator Center is back in operation after a major electrical explosion closed the center and severely injured a worker, officials said. A $177-million machine known as the "B factory" will be started by week's end. Smaller accelerators are already running.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Physicists have for the first time converted light into matter, according to a report in the most recent Physical Review Letters. They have often converted matter into light, as in an atomic bomb, but never the opposite. They achieved this feat by dumping a huge amount of power for a fraction of a second into an area smaller than the period at the end of this sentence.
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