Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStanford President Donald Kennedy
IN THE NEWS

Stanford President Donald Kennedy

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1991
Gardner's defense of Stanford President Donald Kennedy was kind of overdoing it. I read that Kennedy bought $7,000 worth of sheets for his bed, antique furnishings for his home and financed yachting expenses all at the expense of overhead on government research projects. How can anybody look kindly upon that? ROY W. DONLEY, Pacific Palisades
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1991
Gardner's defense of Stanford President Donald Kennedy was kind of overdoing it. I read that Kennedy bought $7,000 worth of sheets for his bed, antique furnishings for his home and financed yachting expenses all at the expense of overhead on government research projects. How can anybody look kindly upon that? ROY W. DONLEY, Pacific Palisades
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1990
I heartily agree with your comments in today's editorial "Why Don't Teachers Teach More" (April 10) and support the views of Stanford President Donald Kennedy (front page, April 6). There are other reasons though that professors are a rarity in the classroom. One is the funding process. Professors are far more "valuable" to the institution in the view of many presidents if they can generate research dollars. Many of these projects are manned by graduate students anxious to get in their field and not too demanding when it comes to financial renumeration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1990
I heartily agree with your comments in today's editorial "Why Don't Teachers Teach More" (April 10) and support the views of Stanford President Donald Kennedy (front page, April 6). There are other reasons though that professors are a rarity in the classroom. One is the funding process. Professors are far more "valuable" to the institution in the view of many presidents if they can generate research dollars. Many of these projects are manned by graduate students anxious to get in their field and not too demanding when it comes to financial renumeration.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Stanford President Donald Kennedy, faced with increasingly strident student demonstrations, announced Thursday that he will attempt to hire 30 minority faculty members within the next decade. But he stopped short of endorsing key demands of students, and recommendations of a 240-page report he commissioned, including a proposal that an ethnic studies course be made a graduation requirement and that financial aid programs be increased. He said he is studying all proposals. Kennedy, speaking to the faculty in an annual report to the Academic Council, also said the university will attempt to increase minority enrollment in graduate programs.
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
In a recent episode of the cartoon strip "Doonesbury," a wealthy businessman delivers a brief commencement address to the graduating class of a mythical university. "I'd go mostly into mutuals, maybe a few T-Bills. . . . Also buy Amstar before Tuesday, though you didn't hear that from me, OK?" he tells a wildly enthusiastic crowd. "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau has been skewering the tradition of commencement speeches for years. And along the way, Trudeau has offered his view of different college generations ready to greet the world in a haze of marijuana smoke or in the cozy interior of a BMW. Real life will come close to copying cartoons on June 18 when Trudeau, a Yalie, is to be the commencement speaker at Stanford University.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
In a speech that provoked angry rebuttals from administrators and some students, U.S. Secretary of Education William J. Bennett charged Monday that Stanford University's recent change in Western Culture studies was "an unfortunate capitulation to a campaign of pressure politics and intimidation." Bennett told a campus audience that protests by minority students scared the university into dropping a mandatory reading list of 15 classics from the course required for all freshmen.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | United Press International
An Arab group, angered over Secretary of State George P. Shultz's refusal to grant Yasser Arafat a visa to enter the United States, wants Stanford University to bar Shultz from its classrooms. The South Bay Arab American Organization, in a letter to Stanford President Donald Kennedy, said Shultz, a professor in Stanford's Graduate School of Business, should not be allowed to teach when he returns from a leave of absence.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An earthquake-damaged fraternity house that Stanford University students and alumni fought to save was torn down after campus officials rejected a $1-million offer to restore it. Bulldozers razed Synergy House, vacant since the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta quake. The 80-year-old building was one of three damaged frat houses that preservationists sought to save and restore for student housing. Stanford turned down the restoration offer by the Campus Cooperative Development Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1989
I appreciated Stanford President Donald Kennedy's creative suggestion ("Civics 101: a Prime Export," Editorial Page, June 10) that "it is not even outlandish to imagine that sometime in the next century, a treaty will be concluded through which certain nations agree to limit rates of population growth in return for fixed ceilings of fossil fuel consumption or carbon dioxide production in other nations." This idea is not at all outlandish. What will be outlandish will be waiting so long to enact creative, bold solutions that they will have little or no effect because the problems they address will have mushroomed beyond control!
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
In a recent episode of the cartoon strip "Doonesbury," a wealthy businessman delivers a brief commencement address to the graduating class of a mythical university. "I'd go mostly into mutuals, maybe a few T-Bills. . . . Also buy Amstar before Tuesday, though you didn't hear that from me, OK?" he tells a wildly enthusiastic crowd. "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau has been skewering the tradition of commencement speeches for years. And along the way, Trudeau has offered his view of different college generations ready to greet the world in a haze of marijuana smoke or in the cozy interior of a BMW. Real life will come close to copying cartoons on June 18 when Trudeau, a Yalie, is to be the commencement speaker at Stanford University.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Stanford President Donald Kennedy, faced with increasingly strident student demonstrations, announced Thursday that he will attempt to hire 30 minority faculty members within the next decade. But he stopped short of endorsing key demands of students, and recommendations of a 240-page report he commissioned, including a proposal that an ethnic studies course be made a graduation requirement and that financial aid programs be increased. He said he is studying all proposals. Kennedy, speaking to the faculty in an annual report to the Academic Council, also said the university will attempt to increase minority enrollment in graduate programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2000
Kenneth MacLean Cuthbertson, 81, Stanford University vice president credited with the nation's two top fund-raising campaigns in higher education. Cuthbertson, a native of San Francisco, spent much of his career at Stanford, where he served as vice president from 1960 until his retirement in 1977.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|