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NEWS
August 4, 1986
A Sunnyvale woman impregnated through in-vitro fertilization has given birth to quadruplets, one of whom was stillborn. Stanford University Hospital officials said Laura Miller, 31, and the three surviving babies were doing well. The babies, weighing between 1.7 and 2.2 pounds when born about 2 1/2 months prematurely, are expected to leave the hospital in about three months.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Mary Engel, Times Staff Writers
They are common fixtures in many medical practices: free pens, mugs, stationery, stethoscopes and doctors' bags, all emblazoned with the logo of a new drug or a pharmaceutical firm. And those catered lunches staffers flock to? It may be courtesy of a major drug supplier. No more -- at least for all staff and students at Stanford University's medical school, hospitals and clinics. Under a policy announced Tuesday, even free sticky notes violate ethics rules.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1989
Sheldon S. King, president and chief executive officer of Stanford University Hospital, will resign effective May 1 to become president of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, a spokesman said. King, 57, has been at Stanford since 1981. "He is going to a major metropolitan center," hospital spokesman Spyros Andreopoulos said. "He has been here long enough to do what he wanted to do." Among King's objectives was to open a modernized wing of the Stanford Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1989
Sheldon S. King, president and chief executive officer of Stanford University Hospital, will resign effective May 1 to become president of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, a spokesman said. King, 57, has been at Stanford since 1981. "He is going to a major metropolitan center," hospital spokesman Spyros Andreopoulos said. "He has been here long enough to do what he wanted to do." Among King's objectives was to open a modernized wing of the Stanford Hospital.
NEWS
March 13, 1988
Stanford University Hospital announced that it is limiting admissions and making arrangements to transfer patients to other hospitals because of a threatened nurses strike Friday. Dr. James B.D. Mark, chief of staff, stated in a letter to patients that the preparations were necessary "so that all patients who remain . . . receive the quality of medical care they require and deserve."
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | Associated Press
David Packard, co-founder and chairman of the giant electronics firm of Hewlett-Packard Co., and his wife pledged $70 million Tuesday to finance construction of a new children's medical center at Stanford University. The gift is the largest commitment from a private donor in Stanford's history, said University President Donald Kennedy, who said it includes a previous Packard pledge of $20 million. William R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Mary Engel, Times Staff Writers
They are common fixtures in many medical practices: free pens, mugs, stationery, stethoscopes and doctors' bags, all emblazoned with the logo of a new drug or a pharmaceutical firm. And those catered lunches staffers flock to? It may be courtesy of a major drug supplier. No more -- at least for all staff and students at Stanford University's medical school, hospitals and clinics. Under a policy announced Tuesday, even free sticky notes violate ethics rules.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Moody's Downgrades California Hospitals: Citing the fierce competitiveness of the state's health care market, Moody's Investors Service said the credit-worthiness of its hospitals has suffered a "pronounced deterioration." The New York-based bond-rating service said it downgraded its credit opinions for a third of 22 California hospitals that it reviewed, including such prestigious institutions as Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and Stanford University Hospital in Palo Alto.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Firefighters rescued a 6-year-old boy Saturday from a fast-moving creek that was near flood level after the week's storm, officials said. Eric Williams of Redwood City was playing near the creek's edge with two friends when he slipped in and was carried about 100 yards before being able to grab a tree branch, said Capt. Frank Fraone of the Menlo Park Fire District. "If he'd let go of that branch his next stop would have been the San Francisco Bay," Fraone said.
NEWS
March 13, 1988
Stanford University Hospital announced that it is limiting admissions and making arrangements to transfer patients to other hospitals because of a threatened nurses strike Friday. Dr. James B.D. Mark, chief of staff, stated in a letter to patients that the preparations were necessary "so that all patients who remain . . . receive the quality of medical care they require and deserve."
NEWS
March 8, 1988
Nurses at Stanford University Hospital have rejected the hospital's latest contract offer and plan to take a strike vote this week, union leaders said. The nurses "overwhelmingly" rejected the offer Friday and will vote today on whether to go on strike. The nurses are required to give 10 days' strike notice to hospital administrators.
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | Associated Press
David Packard, co-founder and chairman of the giant electronics firm of Hewlett-Packard Co., and his wife pledged $70 million Tuesday to finance construction of a new children's medical center at Stanford University. The gift is the largest commitment from a private donor in Stanford's history, said University President Donald Kennedy, who said it includes a previous Packard pledge of $20 million. William R.
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | Associated Press
An 85-year-old woman who was badly hurt in a car wreck was robbed by two men who reached through a smashed window, stole her purse and coat and ran off, police said. According to police, Dorothy Albrightson lost control of her car Wednesday. The car flipped over, leaving the Sunnyvale woman trapped, bleeding and suspended by her seat belt. Witnesses who saw the men talking to Albrightson thought the pair was trying to help her. But moments later, the two ran away.
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