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NEWS
September 20, 1987
Jazz saxophonist Stan Getz, 60, was in stable condition after surgery for removal of a growth near his heart, officials at Stanford University Medical Center said. Tests were being conducted to determine whether the growth, the size of a small grapefruit, was cancerous, a spokesman said after the surgery Friday. Getz, artist in residence at Stanford University, was expected to be hospitalized for up to a week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Mary Engel, Times Staff Writers
They are common fixtures in many medical practices: free pens, mugs, stationery, stethoscopes and doctors' bags, all emblazoned with the logo of a new drug or a pharmaceutical firm. And those catered lunches staffers flock to? It may be courtesy of a major drug supplier. No more -- at least for all staff and students at Stanford University's medical school, hospitals and clinics. Under a policy announced Tuesday, even free sticky notes violate ethics rules.
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NEWS
July 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
Striking nurses at Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital narrowly approved a two-year contract Thursday night, ending a strike that had involved 1,730 nurses and lasted seven weeks. The contract, which gives the nurses pay raises of between 10% and 12% over the next two years, was approved by a vote of 825 to 551. It needed 810 votes to pass.
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
Striking nurses at Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital narrowly approved a two-year contract Thursday night, ending a strike that had involved 1,730 nurses and lasted seven weeks. The contract, which gives the nurses pay raises of between 10% and 12% over the next two years, was approved by a vote of 825 to 551. It needed 810 votes to pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989
A cogent and balanced proposal for controlling the use of human fetal tissue in medical research and transplantation has been presented by the Committee on Ethics of the Stanford University Medical Center. It provides a framework as well as specific proposals for changes in federal regulations that deserve prompt implementation. The Stanford study affirms the medical importance and ethical appropriateness of using fetal tissue. The unique properties of fetal tissue offer "the hope of new medical treatments for millions of people" and, while benefits cannot be guaranteed, "the opportunities to preserve life and alleviate suffering could be enormous," the report concludes.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1998 | LEE DYE
The explosive growth of the Internet has brought about an equally rapid rise in the number of online self-help services designed to help people deal with a wide range of medical problems. Many offer victims a chance to discuss their problem with others suffering similar afflictions, and some include experts who offer counseling and advice. But there is a problem. No one really knows how well, or even if, any of the programs really help.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In what surgeons say is the world's first lung transplant from a living donor, doctors at Stanford University Medical Center on Thursday removed one-third of the right lung of a 46-year-old woman and transplanted it into her 12-year-old daughter in a dramatic effort to save the girl. The child suffers from a rare, invariably fatal lung disease known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The dramatic mother-to-daughter lung transplant at Stanford University Medical Center last week illustrates the risks surgeons and family members are prepared to take with potentially life-saving experimental operations. The complex procedure, planned by doctors for the last year and a half, also demonstrates that transplant surgeons are no longer satisfied with simply prolonging a person's life--particularly a child's--for a year or two.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. Gerald Silverberg, acting chairman of Stanford University Medical School's neurosurgery department, has been demoted amid allegations that he sexually harassed a female colleague. Silverberg said he was asked last week to step down as chairman by Medical School Dean Dr. David Korn and university President Donald Kennedy. Silverberg, who has worked at Stanford for 30 years, said he also was told he will not be considered a candidate for permanent chairman of the department.
NEWS
June 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
Striking nurses and hospital officials are scheduled to meet this week, the first talks since 1,730 registered nurses walked out of Stanford Medical Center and Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital on June 7. Two meetings are scheduled, although neither is considered an official negotiating session. The first meeting, scheduled for today, was arranged by lawyers for the two sides.
NEWS
June 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
Striking nurses and hospital officials are scheduled to meet this week, the first talks since 1,730 registered nurses walked out of Stanford Medical Center and Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital on June 7. Two meetings are scheduled, although neither is considered an official negotiating session. The first meeting, scheduled for today, was arranged by lawyers for the two sides.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1998 | LEE DYE
The explosive growth of the Internet has brought about an equally rapid rise in the number of online self-help services designed to help people deal with a wide range of medical problems. Many offer victims a chance to discuss their problem with others suffering similar afflictions, and some include experts who offer counseling and advice. But there is a problem. No one really knows how well, or even if, any of the programs really help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. Gerald Silverberg, acting chairman of Stanford University Medical School's neurosurgery department, has been demoted amid allegations that he sexually harassed a female colleague. Silverberg said he was asked last week to step down as chairman by Medical School Dean Dr. David Korn and university President Donald Kennedy. Silverberg, who has worked at Stanford for 30 years, said he also was told he will not be considered a candidate for permanent chairman of the department.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The dramatic mother-to-daughter lung transplant at Stanford University Medical Center last week illustrates the risks surgeons and family members are prepared to take with potentially life-saving experimental operations. The complex procedure, planned by doctors for the last year and a half, also demonstrates that transplant surgeons are no longer satisfied with simply prolonging a person's life--particularly a child's--for a year or two.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In what surgeons say is the world's first lung transplant from a living donor, doctors at Stanford University Medical Center on Thursday removed one-third of the right lung of a 46-year-old woman and transplanted it into her 12-year-old daughter in a dramatic effort to save the girl. The child suffers from a rare, invariably fatal lung disease known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989
A cogent and balanced proposal for controlling the use of human fetal tissue in medical research and transplantation has been presented by the Committee on Ethics of the Stanford University Medical Center. It provides a framework as well as specific proposals for changes in federal regulations that deserve prompt implementation. The Stanford study affirms the medical importance and ethical appropriateness of using fetal tissue. The unique properties of fetal tissue offer "the hope of new medical treatments for millions of people" and, while benefits cannot be guaranteed, "the opportunities to preserve life and alleviate suffering could be enormous," the report concludes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Mary Engel, Times Staff Writers
They are common fixtures in many medical practices: free pens, mugs, stationery, stethoscopes and doctors' bags, all emblazoned with the logo of a new drug or a pharmaceutical firm. And those catered lunches staffers flock to? It may be courtesy of a major drug supplier. No more -- at least for all staff and students at Stanford University's medical school, hospitals and clinics. Under a policy announced Tuesday, even free sticky notes violate ethics rules.
NEWS
September 20, 1987
Jazz saxophonist Stan Getz, 60, was in stable condition after surgery for removal of a growth near his heart, officials at Stanford University Medical Center said. Tests were being conducted to determine whether the growth, the size of a small grapefruit, was cancerous, a spokesman said after the surgery Friday. Getz, artist in residence at Stanford University, was expected to be hospitalized for up to a week.
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