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NEWS
November 17, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 120 pounds of marijuana--evidence in the trial of a Los Altos man--has been stolen from a locked storage shed at a ranger station in the Stanislaus National Forest. A U.S. Forest Service spokesman said that the plants have a street value of almost $225,000 and that the FBI has been called into the investigation. The marijuana was being held as evidence against Jeffrey Peter Gurney, 37.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Thousands of acres of Yosemite National Park closed to the public since last year's massive Rim fire have been reopened, officials announced Wednesday. However, park officials cautioned those visiting the affected areas - which include Hetch Hetchy hiking trails and the Tuolumne Grove of Giant Sequoias - faced "potential risks" such as "hazardous trees, uneven ground, potential rockfall, and down and dead debris on trails. " Fire restrictions also have been lifted, park officials said in their statement, but could be put in place again later this year because of California's "extreme drought conditions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2004 | Eric Slater, Times Staff Writer
A firefighter was killed Sunday and six others were injured when the relatively small blaze they were fighting in the rugged Stanislaus National Forest overran the crew, fire officials said. The seven-member California Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention "helitack" team was among the first to arrive at the blaze along the Tuolumne River. The team's helicopter landed about 1 p.m. Less than an hour later, a call came in to the fire's command center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Thousands of acres of Yosemite National Park that were closed to the public since last year's massive Rim fire have been reopened, park officials announced Wednesday. However, park officials cautioned visitors to the affected areas - which include Hetch Hetchy hiking trails and the Tuolumne Grove of Giant Sequoias - about potential risks such as "hazardous trees, uneven ground, potential rockfall, and down and dead debris on trails. " Fire restrictions also have been lifted, but could be put in place again later this year because of California's extreme drought conditions, the park statement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
TUOLUMNE, Calif. - Tourists stopped at the Rim of the World overlook on California 120 earlier this month to take photos of the panoramic view - just as they always have. But they stared in silence at the ashen hues of a landscape swept by the largest wildfire to burn in the Sierra Nevada in more than a century of recordkeeping. Steep canyon walls and mountain slopes that had been robed in chaparral and oak were now draped in black, spreading to the horizon in a funereal scene. To the north, miles and miles of forest were still and lifeless, the earth scoured by flame.
NEWS
August 30, 1987
Firefighters contained a 500-acre brush and timber fire burning just outside Yosemite National Park in stands of valuable commercial timber. The blaze broke out on privately owned land in Stanislaus National Forest. Occupants of some campgrounds chose to leave the area because of the smoke, but a Forest Service spokesman said no one was in danger and no structures were threatened.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stanislaus National Forest has completed acquisition of Bower Cave, which historians say was known to Indians hundreds of years ago. The deal involved a land exchange with Fibreboard Corp. under which the Park Service obtained the 855-acre Linkletter Ranch, including the historic cave. Miwok Indians called the Mariposa County cave Oo-tin , meaning Home of the early Star and in the 1870s gold miners used the cave as a dance hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Stanislaus National Forest officials can go ahead with a plan to spray herbicide over nearly 1,200 acres near Yosemite National Park, regional U.S. Forest Service officials said. The herbicide is meant to kill brush that national forest officials said has taken over an area that burned 17 years ago. The proposal had run into opposition from environmental organizations and Native American groups who say plants used by humans will also be killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Forest Service has closed a Stanislaus National Forest road and an abandoned uranium mine area after determining that several rocks in the area were emitting high radiation levels. Employees closed the Juniper uranium mine and Forest Road 5N33 about two miles west of Kennedy Meadows Resort on Tuesday after environmental engineers found that waste rocks were emitting more radiation than they had in the past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The U.S. Forest Service is proposing an extensive salvage operation to log dead trees on about 46 square miles of timberland charred in last year's massive Rim fire in the Sierra Nevada. The project would be one of the largest federal salvage efforts in California in years. If approved, it could yield more lumber than the combined annual output of all the national forests in the state. But it is already triggering a fight by some environmentalists who argue that the post-fire logging would destroy valuable habitat for rare birds and other species that thrive in blackened forests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
A recent study commissioned by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission estimates that damage from the Rim fire to the natural environment and to property values could total about $250 million to $1.8 billion. The preliminary assessment released last month places dollar amounts on losses in "environmental benefits," carbon storage and the asset value of property near where the fire burned. Researchers from Earth Economics found losses in environmental benefits of $100 million to $736 million, in carbon storage of $102 million to $797 million, and in private property values of $49.7 million to $265 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
A recent study commissioned by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission estimates that damages from the Rim fire on the natural environment and to property value could total between about $250 million and $1.8 billion. The preliminary assessment released last month places dollar amounts on losses in “environmental benefits,” carbon storage and the asset value of property near where the fire burned. Researchers from Earth Economics found that between $100 million and $736 million was lost in environmental benefits, between $102 million and $797 million was lost in carbon storage, and fire-related private property value loss ranges from $49.7 million to $265 million.
OPINION
December 24, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The Stanislaus National Forest was a thickly forested wonderland of streams, wildlife and campgrounds until last summer's Rim fire - started by a hunter's illegal campfire - scorched more than 250,000 acres of it and the adjacent Yosemite National Park. To many people, it's a tragic sight now. What was once dense greenery is now scarred, gray and empty looking. But nature takes the long view. From its perspective, fire is about rejuvenation. It reinvigorates the soil and stimulates the growth of a greater variety of healthy new plants.
SCIENCE
October 3, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Some of the West's leading fire scientists are calling for the increased use of managed burns to reduce fuel levels in the region's forests, warning that climate change is leaving them more vulnerable to large, high-severity wildfires. In a paper published Friday in the journal Science, seven fire and forest ecologists say the rate of fuel reduction and restoration treatments is far below what is needed to help sustain forest landscapes in an era of rising temperatures and increased drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
TUOLUMNE, Calif. - Tourists stopped at the Rim of the World overlook on California 120 earlier this month to take photos of the panoramic view - just as they always have. But they stared in silence at the ashen hues of a landscape swept by the largest wildfire to burn in the Sierra Nevada in more than a century of recordkeeping. Steep canyon walls and mountain slopes that had been robed in chaparral and oak were now draped in black, spreading to the horizon in a funereal scene. To the north, miles and miles of forest were still and lifeless, the earth scoured by flame.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
The Rim fire, which has burned into Yosemite National Park and threatened a vital water supply to San Francisco, was started by a hunter who let an illegal fire “escape,” the U.S. Forest Service said Thursday. The fire was not started by a marijuana growing operation, despite rumors to the contrary, the U.S. Forest Service's investigation unit and the Tuolumne County district attorney's office concluded. The hunter has been identified and his name is being withheld pending further investigation, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013
Join us at 9 a.m. when we discuss the environmental effects of the Rim fire near Yosemite National Park with Times reporter Bettina Boxall. The extent of the damage from the blaze won't be known until after it dies out and crews survey the burn area. But given the intensity of the fire and 200-foot-tall walls of flame shooting up canyons, John Buckley and others expect nothing to be left on big patches of mountain chaparral areas and timberland. "It's making these incredible hot runs where it's literally wiping out the forest," said Buckley, an ex-firefighter for the U.S. Forest Service and head of the Central Sierra Environmental Resource Center, which has worked for more than two decades to protect the region's ecosystem.
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