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Stanislaus River

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NEWS
September 23, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Hard rain pelted the river and the ghost forest of drowned oaks and sugar pines along the banks, but Jim Foust was too delighted to be cold. He was confirming the rumor that has swept like a good joke through California's river rafting fraternity--after 10 years at the bottom of a lake, the famous rapids of the Stanislaus River canyon are runnable again. "It's really kind of amazing," Foust said, paddling down the Stanislaus as he had dozens of times in the 1970s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Two water agencies are reviving a proposal to enlarge a dam on the Stanislaus River's south fork to supply Stockton and outlying areas of Tuolumne County. A reservoir up to 10 times larger than the one behind Lyons Dam would be created. It would be the first major on-stream dam built in the state since the dam blocking Melones Lake was enlarged in 1979.
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TRAVEL
September 11, 1994 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Zamichow is a Times Metro writer. and
For several weeks, 12-year-old Sam lamented the lack of adventure in his life. Been there, done that, he said. Beach smeach. So the challenge: Come up with something for young Indiana Jones that would still be fun for Ben, 9, and Katie, 6. We decided on white-water rafting on the Stanislaus River, a one-day trip ($65 per youth, $85 per adult) that wends through a beautiful limestone canyon in Mother Lode country about 40 miles west of Yosemite.
TRAVEL
September 11, 1994 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Zamichow is a Times Metro writer. and
For several weeks, 12-year-old Sam lamented the lack of adventure in his life. Been there, done that, he said. Beach smeach. So the challenge: Come up with something for young Indiana Jones that would still be fun for Ben, 9, and Katie, 6. We decided on white-water rafting on the Stanislaus River, a one-day trip ($65 per youth, $85 per adult) that wends through a beautiful limestone canyon in Mother Lode country about 40 miles west of Yosemite.
SPORTS
July 17, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the historic main fork of the Stanislaus River was backing up to fill its limestone gorges in the early 1980s, signs were posted near the Parrotts Ferry Road bridge indicating the birth of the New Melones Reservoir downstream: "Scenic Overlook." Overnight, the signs were altered to direct attention upstream and read: "Scenic Drowning. " It was a symbolic protest by those who had fought, unsuccessfully, to save the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Two water agencies are reviving a proposal to enlarge a dam on the Stanislaus River's south fork to supply Stockton and outlying areas of Tuolumne County. A reservoir up to 10 times larger than the one behind Lyons Dam would be created. It would be the first major on-stream dam built in the state since the dam blocking Melones Lake was enlarged in 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1989
Maybe the expression "out of sight, out of mind" could be used to explain the miscalculations and inaccuracies presented in The Times' editorial ("Savoring a Dam Decision," Sept. 3) denouncing the value of the New Melones dam. But in all fairness to your readers and the numerous beneficiaries of this project, I feel those benefits bear repeating. In your editorial you say that the New Melones dam, located on the Stanislaus River, "provides very cheap power for a small number of Californians."
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Buy water for ducks and fish? That is what the state Department of Fish and Game and hunter organizations are doing in an unprecedented effort to minimize the destructive effect of the California drought on migrating ducks and spawning salmon. The additional water will be poured during the next three months into shrunken rivers and thirsty wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley to provide the salmon and waterfowl with the necessary habitat to survive.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Hard rain pelted the river and the ghost forest of drowned oaks and sugar pines along the banks, but Jim Foust was too delighted to be cold. He was confirming the rumor that has swept like a good joke through California's river rafting fraternity--after 10 years at the bottom of a lake, the famous rapids of the Stanislaus River canyon are runnable again. "It's really kind of amazing," Foust said, paddling down the Stanislaus as he had dozens of times in the 1970s.
NEWS
May 27, 1987
The body of a 46-year-old Oakdale man missing for a year has been recovered from the Stanislaus River, Tuolumne County sheriff's officials announced. The body of Roy Kitchens was found wedged between two rocks on Clark Fork, about 23 miles north of Pinecrest, Deputy Tom Kaufmann said. Clark was rafting in the river during high flows last June when he disappeared.
SPORTS
July 17, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the historic main fork of the Stanislaus River was backing up to fill its limestone gorges in the early 1980s, signs were posted near the Parrotts Ferry Road bridge indicating the birth of the New Melones Reservoir downstream: "Scenic Overlook." Overnight, the signs were altered to direct attention upstream and read: "Scenic Drowning. " It was a symbolic protest by those who had fought, unsuccessfully, to save the river.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Hard rain pelted the river and the ghost forest of drowned oaks and sugar pines along the banks, but Jim Foust was too delighted to be cold. He was confirming the rumor that has swept like a good joke through California's river rafting fraternity--after 10 years at the bottom of a lake, the famous rapids of the Stanislaus River canyon are runnable again. "It's really kind of amazing," Foust said, paddling down the Stanislaus as he had dozens of times in the 1970s.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Hard rain pelted the river and the ghost forest of drowned oaks and sugar pines along the banks, but Jim Foust was too delighted to be cold. He was confirming the rumor that has swept like a good joke through California's river rafting fraternity--after 10 years at the bottom of a lake, the famous rapids of the Stanislaus River canyon are runnable again. "It's really kind of amazing," Foust said, paddling down the Stanislaus as he had dozens of times in the 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1989
Maybe the expression "out of sight, out of mind" could be used to explain the miscalculations and inaccuracies presented in The Times' editorial ("Savoring a Dam Decision," Sept. 3) denouncing the value of the New Melones dam. But in all fairness to your readers and the numerous beneficiaries of this project, I feel those benefits bear repeating. In your editorial you say that the New Melones dam, located on the Stanislaus River, "provides very cheap power for a small number of Californians."
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Buy water for ducks and fish? That is what the state Department of Fish and Game and hunter organizations are doing in an unprecedented effort to minimize the destructive effect of the California drought on migrating ducks and spawning salmon. The additional water will be poured during the next three months into shrunken rivers and thirsty wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley to provide the salmon and waterfowl with the necessary habitat to survive.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | Associated Press
A bus carrying Japanese tourists plunged 70 feet off a highway into a ravine Wednesday night, injuring 15 people, the California Highway Patrol said. The bus, carrying 31 people, was returning to San Francisco from Yosemite National Park, the CHP said. Knights Ferry is on the Stanislaus River, about 40 miles southeast of Stockton. The cause of the accident on California 120 was not immediately determined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of dead fish have mysteriously washed up in the San Joaquin River. The California Department of Fish and Game is investigating the fish kill Tuesday along an eight- to 10-mile stretch from Stockton to the mouth of the Stanislaus River. An estimated 2,000 to 3,000 catfish, chad, striper and black bass were reportedly killed. No source of contamination has yet been found.
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