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Stanislav Shushkevich

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NEWS
January 27, 1994 | From Reuters
The country's Soviet-era Parliament ousted Belarus' liberal leader, Stanislav Shushkevich, on Wednesday and appeared to bury any hope of rapid economic reforms and a neutral foreign policy. Legislators voted 209 to 36 to dismiss Shushkevich, the 59-year-old chairman of Parliament who has waged a virtually single-handed ideological battle against reluctant converts to market economics. His ouster came two weeks after he received President Clinton's backing during the U.S.
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NEWS
January 27, 1994 | From Reuters
The country's Soviet-era Parliament ousted Belarus' liberal leader, Stanislav Shushkevich, on Wednesday and appeared to bury any hope of rapid economic reforms and a neutral foreign policy. Legislators voted 209 to 36 to dismiss Shushkevich, the 59-year-old chairman of Parliament who has waged a virtually single-handed ideological battle against reluctant converts to market economics. His ouster came two weeks after he received President Clinton's backing during the U.S.
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NEWS
December 9, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and the leaders of Ukraine and Belarus on Sunday declared the Soviet Union dead and established a new "commonwealth of independent states" with the capital in Minsk, capital of Belarus, rather than Moscow. "We, the Republic of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, as the founding states of the U.S.S.R. and co-signatories of the 1922 Union Treaty . . . state that the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The men who signed the Soviet Union's political obituary tried on Monday to reassure President Bush and a concerned world that the awesome destructive forces of the Soviet nuclear arsenal will remain in sure hands. "There is no threat of the spread of nuclear arms, there is no threat of destabilization," said Andrei Kozyrev, the Russian Federation's foreign minister. Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The men who signed the Soviet Union's political obituary tried on Monday to reassure President Bush and a concerned world that the awesome destructive forces of the Soviet nuclear arsenal will remain in sure hands. "There is no threat of the spread of nuclear arms, there is no threat of destabilization," said Andrei Kozyrev, the Russian Federation's foreign minister. Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
January 15, 1994
Weapons: President Clinton and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin signed a pact calling for their nations to aim nuclear weapons away from each other. NATO: Yeltsin informed Clinton that Russia intended to participate in Partnership for Peace, a NATO plan offering military and political cooperation with former Warsaw Pact rivals.
NEWS
September 3, 1991
It was a stormy session Monday at the Soviet Union's supreme government body, the Congress of People's Deputies: "Let's speak frankly: Our union is not only on the brink of collapse, it is in a state of collapse. We're in the state similar to the one in Yugoslavia. And I believe that this is the only decision, we have no other way and here we have made an essential step forward. . . ." --Sergei S. Alexeyev, chairman of the Constitutional Compliance Committee of the Congress.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another rout for reformers in the former Soviet Union, a pro-Communist ex-police official was elected head of state in Belarus on Friday. Mechislav Grib, 57, who advocates closer economic and military ties with Russia, was chosen on the second ballot by a vote of 183-55 to succeed ousted liberal reformer Stanislav Shushkevich as Speaker of Parliament.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ukrainian President Leonid M. Kravchuk proposed Friday that Russia and neighboring Belarus join with his new nation to form a Slavic commonwealth as the old Soviet Union continues to disintegrate. Kravchuk, riding the crest of nationalism in Ukraine, which voted Sunday for independence, would bring together three of the 15 former Soviet republics in a loose confederation that could ensure that their economic ties remain intact.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accentuating the positive, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Yegor T. Gaidar said Saturday that the collective defense agreement signed by Russia and five other former Soviet republics Friday has given the Commonwealth of Independent States a new lease on life.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and the leaders of Ukraine and Belarus on Sunday declared the Soviet Union dead and established a new "commonwealth of independent states" with the capital in Minsk, capital of Belarus, rather than Moscow. "We, the Republic of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, as the founding states of the U.S.S.R. and co-signatories of the 1922 Union Treaty . . . state that the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the former Soviet republics, alarmed at the specter of a Communist rollback in Russia, threw their support Friday to Boris N. Yeltsin as he proposed that their states form a far tighter economic, political and military union. But no firm decisions were taken on Yeltsin's suggestions.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and VIKTOR GREBENSHIKOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The majority of the members of the Commonwealth of Independent States signed a collective security treaty Friday, committing themselves to come to each other's aid in case of attack and assuring Russia a controlling military role in most of the old Soviet Union. "Now that most of the states within the Commonwealth have opted for their own armed forces, we are shifting toward a defensive alliance," Kazakhstan's president, Nursultan Nazarbayev, told a news conference.
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