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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Stanley A. Dashew, an inventor and entrepreneur who helped revolutionize the credit card industry, died of natural causes Thursday in Los Angeles, according to a family spokesman. He was 96. Dashew held 40 patents in fields as diverse as credit card processing, mining, mass transit, medical equipment and offshore oil transportation. He also was an avid sailor, writer and photographer who late in life wrote for the Christian Science Monitor and the Huffington Post. At 94, he distilled his insights about life and business in a book, "You Can Do It: Inspiration and Lessons from an Inventor, Entrepreneur, and Sailor.
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BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The nomination of former Bank of Israel head Stanley Fischer to be Janet Yellen's lieutenant gives the Federal Reserve a "Dream Team" in the top two positions,  Pimco Chief Executive Mohamed El-Erian said Monday. Fischer was the "most inspired choice" of a slate of three nominees announced Friday by the White House, El-Erian said in an opinion column for CNBC. The others were former Treasury official Lael Brainard, and Jerome Powell, a Fed governor since 2012 whose term expires on Jan. 31. El-Erian said the three nominees "form a well-balanced and strong slate at a particularly important time for Fed policy.
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WORLD
December 9, 2009 | By Julian E. Barnes and Tony Perry
Afghanistan's security forces will need U.S. support for another 15 to 20 years, President Hamid Karzai said Tuesday in the latest in a series of indications that U.S. involvement there is likely to last far into the future. Also Tuesday, the top U.S. and allied commander in Afghanistan, Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, told lawmakers in Washington that the U.S. needed to signal a long-term commitment in Afghanistan in order to reverse the momentum of the Taliban-led insurgency, a commitment that he said must continue even after combat forces begin to draw down in 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Stanley Kauffmann, who died Wednesday at 97, will be remembered for his intellectually rigorous, neatly manicured film reviews -- the meditative yin to Pauline Kael's ecstatic yang. But as a drama critic, I'm especially grateful for his equally acute body of drama criticism, which is a tonic to read in this age of trumped-up enthusiasms and attention-grabbing pans. “Persons of the Drama,” one of Kauffmann's collections of theater criticism, can usually be found in a pile on my desk with anthologies of theater reviews by his friends and colleagues Robert Brustein, Gordon Rogoff and the late Richard Gilman, all of whom taught at the Yale School of Drama and helped (directly and indirectly)
NEWS
April 3, 1995
Stanley A. Cain, 92, assistant secretary of the Department of the Interior during the Johnson Administration. A pioneer in botanical research, Cain served as president of the Ecological Society of America and helped make conservation a national concern. Cain also was one of the designers of the UC Santa Cruz campus, demanding that no redwood tree be cut without administration approval. Born in Jefferson County, Ind.
WORLD
July 24, 2010 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal said goodbye to the Army on Friday in a poignant ceremony that paid tribute to his three decades of military service and barely mentioned his firing by President Obama for insubordination. It was McChrystal who alluded most directly to his own precipitous fall, standing at the podium and looking out at formations of soldiers and former comrades. "Service in this business is tough and often dangerous, and it extracts a price for participation, and that price can be high," McChrystal said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Stanley Kauffmann, who died Wednesday at 97, will be remembered for his intellectually rigorous, neatly manicured film reviews -- the meditative yin to Pauline Kael's ecstatic yang. But as a drama critic, I'm especially grateful for his equally acute body of drama criticism, which is a tonic to read in this age of trumped-up enthusiasms and attention-grabbing pans. “Persons of the Drama,” one of Kauffmann's collections of theater criticism, can usually be found in a pile on my desk with anthologies of theater reviews by his friends and colleagues Robert Brustein, Gordon Rogoff and the late Richard Gilman, all of whom taught at the Yale School of Drama and helped (directly and indirectly)
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
While gang wars raged on the streets of Los Angeles, a little noticed though violent series of attacks broke out among members of the Crips gang imprisoned on San Quentin's Death Row, prison officials say. The battle reached its height last October when Tiequon A. Cox, who was in the Rolling 60s faction of the Crips in Los Angeles, stabbed and wounded Stanley (Tookie) Williams, a body builder who helped found the gang 20 years ago. Williams has denied any continuing role in Crip activity on or off the row. And Colleen E. Butler, Cox's attorney, noted that in prison, "what appears to be the case is not always what happened."
BUSINESS
September 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
An advocacy group for low- income housing accused Morgan Stanley of discriminating against minority borrowers seeking mortgages. The National Community Reinvestment Coalition said it filed a civil rights complaint asking the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Securities and Exchange Commission to investigate whether Morgan Stanley used the practice of redlining when considering mortgage applicants.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
Roy Rogers, the "King of the Cowboys" who sang, smiled and occasionally shot his way into the hearts of multitudes of Little Buckaroos, died Monday. He was 86. Rogers died of congestive heart failure in his Apple Valley home near Victorville, with his wife and co-star Dale Evans and other family members at his side. He had undergone heart surgery in 1977 and 1990 and had been somewhat frail in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Stanley A. Dashew, an inventor and entrepreneur who helped revolutionize the credit card industry, died of natural causes Thursday in Los Angeles, according to a family spokesman. He was 96. Dashew held 40 patents in fields as diverse as credit card processing, mining, mass transit, medical equipment and offshore oil transportation. He also was an avid sailor, writer and photographer who late in life wrote for the Christian Science Monitor and the Huffington Post. At 94, he distilled his insights about life and business in a book, "You Can Do It: Inspiration and Lessons from an Inventor, Entrepreneur, and Sailor.
SPORTS
September 23, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
MONTREAL -- If the names of players and teams that have won the Stanley Cup were perfectly aligned on its barrel, if the task of etching those names for posterity were left to a heartless machine, the Cup would still be distinctive but it would be too perfect, more likely to be admired from afar than embraced. If neat rows of letters marched around the bands of a spotlessly gleaming trophy, eager hands might be hesitant to touch it and trace names that are both strange and familiar.
SPORTS
June 12, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
Clay Stanley's 80-mph jump serve is one of the most potent weapons in international volleyball. And as a right-side hitter, he may be the best in the world. But when U.S. national team Coach Alan Knipe is asked what Stanley brings to the court, the first thing he mentions is "the stare. " "He has the ability to look right through his teammates," Knipe says. And more often than not, Knipe says, those teammates get the message. "It's time to go," Knipe says. "The guys respond to him because they know he's their leader.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
The gig: A 95-year-old sailor, inventor and entrepreneur, Stanley A. Dashew is probably best known for his invention of credit card embossing and imprinting machines in the 1950s that helped give birth to the plastic credit card industry. He has also invented other devices in such fields as shipping, mining and marine recreation. He personally holds 14 U.S. patents. Dashew and his late wife, Rita, were world travelers who supported efforts to strengthen international ties and promote peace.
WORLD
July 24, 2010 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal said goodbye to the Army on Friday in a poignant ceremony that paid tribute to his three decades of military service and barely mentioned his firing by President Obama for insubordination. It was McChrystal who alluded most directly to his own precipitous fall, standing at the podium and looking out at formations of soldiers and former comrades. "Service in this business is tough and often dangerous, and it extracts a price for participation, and that price can be high," McChrystal said.
WORLD
July 5, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
It can be a split-second decision, or one that plays out over long and agonizing hours: to kill or not to kill. "Rules of engagement" is the dry, legalistic term for the visceral battlefield calculus of when and whether to use deadly force to counter threat, real or perceived. Across Afghanistan, these rules serve as the marching orders that govern Western troops' daily encounters with Taliban fighters and color dealings with Afghan civilians. U.S. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, who on Sunday formally took command of Western forces here, must decide in the coming weeks or months whether to recalibrate the stringent rules of engagement laid down last summer by his predecessor, Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, who recently resigned over remarks that laid bare a dysfunctional civilian-military relationship.
SPORTS
September 23, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
MONTREAL -- If the names of players and teams that have won the Stanley Cup were perfectly aligned on its barrel, if the task of etching those names for posterity were left to a heartless machine, the Cup would still be distinctive but it would be too perfect, more likely to be admired from afar than embraced. If neat rows of letters marched around the bands of a spotlessly gleaming trophy, eager hands might be hesitant to touch it and trace names that are both strange and familiar.
SPORTS
February 22, 2010 | By Chris Kuc
The streets of this city are teeming with people from around the globe proudly displaying pride for their countries during the 2010 Olympic Games. Some are decked out head-to-toe in the colors of their nations and some wear flags draped across their shoulders. At any given time, chants of "Go (insert name of your favorite country here), go" break out. Everywhere you turn, there's evidence of the Olympic fever that has gripped the city. Unless you turn toward Stanley Park. Acting as a 1,000-acre oasis from the international madness that has overtaken downtown and the surrounding area, Stanley Park is steps from the hustle and bustle of the Games and ordinary urban life.
WORLD
June 22, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes, Los Angeles Times
In a new magazine profile, the top commander in Afghanistan, Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, and his advisors appear to ridicule Vice President Joe Biden and are portrayed as dismissive of civilian oversight of the war. The article, in Rolling Stone, said McChrystal's staff frequently derided top civilian leaders, including special envoy Richard C. Holbrooke and U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry. The detailed report on the top command in Afghanistan could worsen tensions with the White House, which in the past has felt boxed in by military commanders anxious to get more troops for the war. The article said that only Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton received good reviews from McChrystal's inner circle.
OPINION
June 22, 2010 | Bruce Ackerman
It is tempting to compare Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal's criticism of Obama administration officials to Gen. Douglas MacArthur's defiance of President Truman during the Korean War. But something important has changed over the last 60 years. Although MacArthur challenged Truman, the larger officer corps was then thoroughly committed to principles of civilian control. But today, McChrystal's actions are symptomatic of a broader politicization of the military command. During the early 20th century, strict nonpartisanship was the professional norm.
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