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Stanley B Greenberg

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December 28, 1993 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began in earnest with John F. Kennedy. Now, 33 years later, public opinion polling has become a fixture in American government--so much so that even pollsters quarrel over whether they have become too influential in shaping public policy. Some pollsters point out that President Clinton's pollster, Stanley B. Greenberg, is one of his most important advisers.
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BOOKS
March 19, 1995 | William Greider, William Greider writes regularly for Rolling Stone and is the author of "Who Will Tell the People? The Betrayal of American Democracy" (Touchstone paperback)
Timing, they say, is everything in show business and politics, but it also matters in book publishing. If Stanley Greenberg had offered this treatise two years ago, it might have been greatly admired for insightful analysis, trenchant observations and the other cliches reviewers employ when they wish to sound sagacious. Alas, Greenberg missed his window. Published now, the book is kind of embarrassing.
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BOOKS
March 19, 1995 | William Greider, William Greider writes regularly for Rolling Stone and is the author of "Who Will Tell the People? The Betrayal of American Democracy" (Touchstone paperback)
Timing, they say, is everything in show business and politics, but it also matters in book publishing. If Stanley Greenberg had offered this treatise two years ago, it might have been greatly admired for insightful analysis, trenchant observations and the other cliches reviewers employ when they wish to sound sagacious. Alas, Greenberg missed his window. Published now, the book is kind of embarrassing.
NEWS
December 28, 1993 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began in earnest with John F. Kennedy. Now, 33 years later, public opinion polling has become a fixture in American government--so much so that even pollsters quarrel over whether they have become too influential in shaping public policy. Some pollsters point out that President Clinton's pollster, Stanley B. Greenberg, is one of his most important advisers.
NEWS
March 23, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to dispel any perception of slack security, White House officials have asked outside presidential advisers James Carville, Paul Begala, Mandy Grunwald and Stanley B. Greenberg to submit voluntarily to full FBI background checks in return for their White House passes. Patsy Thomasson, director of the White House office of administration, told a House Appropriations subcommittee Tuesday that the checks would be run as part of a broader effort to tighten security.
NEWS
March 9, 1995
STROM REDEEMED: The public life of Sen. Strom Thurmond, the 92-year-old Republican from South Carolina, has taken many turns--but perhaps none sharper than Wednesday, when the Greater Washington Urban League honored the former segregationist. Officials for the league, a branch of one of the nation's most prestigious civil rights groups, said the announcement spurred howls of outrage from some black activists.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | Paul Houston, Times Staff Writer
HANGERS-ON: All across the Bush Administration, high-powered officials are preparing to jump ship, secure in the knowledge they'll be thrown overboard if they don't. A rare few, though, actually seem to be entertaining thoughts of avoiding such a fate. For a political appointee, succeeding at hanging on involves some deft work--for starters, appearing not to be political after all, or not so much as to offend. . . . At NASA, Daniel S.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
An organization of centrist Democrats meeting here Monday cheered signs of President Clinton's political revival, but warned that the resurgence may prove fleeting if the party defines itself solely by opposing Republican initiatives. "If anybody believes Republican mistakes are going to be the basis of a new Democratic majority, we are kidding ourselves," said Al From, president of the Democratic Leadership Council. Likewise, Stanley B.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton has made no inroads into the vast bloc of voters who fueled Ross Perot's candidacy last year and who have grown increasingly skeptical that Clinton can deliver anything more than politics as usual, according to a survey by a moderate Democratic organization. If anything, Clinton has lost ground among the nearly 20 million voters in the middle of the American political spectrum who supported the Texas billionaire.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Democratic National Committee Thursday ratified President Clinton's choice of David C. Wilhelm, his campaign manager, as the party's new chairman. In a unanimous vote, the committee selected Wilhelm, a Chicago-based political consultant, to replace Ronald H. Brown, who won Senate approval Thursday as Clinton's secretary of commerce. At 36, Wilhelm is the youngest Democratic Party chairman in recent memory, officials said.
NEWS
January 22, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to sway the growing national debate on how to spend money saved from defense cutbacks, a liberal coalition Tuesday launched a two-year campaign of television ads, sermons and town meetings to urge that the savings be used for struggling domestic programs, not for tax cuts and deficit reduction. To help support their position, the Campaign for New Priorities, spearheaded by labor unions and women's groups and endorsed by Boston's Democratic Mayor Raymond L.
NEWS
May 24, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a bipartisan agreement to balance the budget locked into place, President Clinton said Friday that he will now push for broad changes in Medicare and other federal benefit programs to prevent them from exploding in cost in the next century. Clinton said he plans to launch a bipartisan effort to tackle the stubborn, politically sensitive issue of benefit programs soon, with a goal of proposing new legislation next year.
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