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Stanley B Prusiner

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October 7, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
An intensely single-minded and controversial UC San Francisco medical researcher received the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday for discovering an "entirely new genre of disease-causing agents" responsible for exotic brain disorders such as mad cow disease and its human equivalents. Dr. Stanley B. Prusiner, 55, a neurologist and biochemist, was awarded the prize for his pioneering work on an infectious particle that he named a "prion" in a landmark 1982 study.
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NEWS
October 7, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
An intensely single-minded and controversial UC San Francisco medical researcher received the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday for discovering an "entirely new genre of disease-causing agents" responsible for exotic brain disorders such as mad cow disease and its human equivalents. Dr. Stanley B. Prusiner, 55, a neurologist and biochemist, was awarded the prize for his pioneering work on an infectious particle that he named a "prion" in a landmark 1982 study.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
UC San Francisco researchers have developed a faster, more reliable and more sensitive way to test for mad cow disease, allowing more efficient safety screening of blood, medicines and other products derived from cattle. Nobel laureate Stanley B. Prusiner developed mice engineered to be sensitive to the illness, which turns the brains of cows to spongy tissue.
MAGAZINE
December 2, 2001
Like show biz junkies monitoring the Golden Globe and Directors Guild awards for augurs of possible Academy nods, eggheads see the Gairdner Foundation and Albert Lasker Medical Research awards as Nobel predictors in the biomedical research categories. Consider this: Of the 255 International Gairdner Awards presented by the Toronto-based medical science foundation since 1959, 56 individual winners have bagged a Nobel in chemistry or physiology/medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000
The University of California has been home to 43 Nobel Prize winners. Last week, three UC professors won prizes for chemistry, physics and economics. Here is a list of Nobel laureates. Berkeley *--* Laureate Year Field Ernest O. Lawrence 1939 Physics John H. Northrop 1946 Chemistry Wendell M. Stanley 1946 Chemistry William F. Giauque 1949 Chemistry Edwin M. McMillan 1951 Chemistry Glenn T. Seaborg 1951 Chemistry Emilio G. Segre 1959 Physics Owen Chamberlain* 1959 Physics Donald A.
NEWS
April 23, 1985 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
An infectious agent that is suspected of causing several rare and fatal brain diseases may be implicated in the deaths of three adults who were treated as youngsters with human growth hormone, a substance derived from the brain tissue of cadavers. Known as a prion, the suspect agent is believed to be the cause of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a degenerative brain disorder. Prions were first identified by Dr. Stanley B.
MAGAZINE
December 2, 2001
On the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize, the government of Sweden and more than a dozen California educational institutions remind us that a disproportionate number of laureates have ties to the state--ties, it must be admitted, that in some cases seem comparable to an innkeeper's boast that George Washington slept there. So be it. The Golden State is nothing if not inclusive.
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