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Stanley Bennett Clay

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Welcome to Stanley Bennett Clay's Baldwin Hills. In "Ritual" (at the Ebony Showcase Theatre through Sunday), Clay introduces audiences to the Becker family of Baldwin Hills, a black upper-middle-class foursome at war with each other and the pressures of modern-day assimilation. "Asians are having operations to make their eyes look more Anglo," said the show's writer-producer-director. "Hispanics are lightening their hair and blacks are getting the nose operation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Welcome to Stanley Bennett Clay's Baldwin Hills. In "Ritual" (at the Ebony Showcase Theatre through Sunday), Clay introduces audiences to the Becker family of Baldwin Hills, a black upper-middle-class foursome at war with each other and the pressures of modern-day assimilation. "Asians are having operations to make their eyes look more Anglo," said the show's writer-producer-director. "Hispanics are lightening their hair and blacks are getting the nose operation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2004 | Don Shirley
Why did "Why Do Fools Fall in Love?" fall apart? The new musical, about thrice-married doo-wop singer Frankie Lymon, sounded promising. Lymon's story had already been turned into a 1998 movie with the same title. Tina Andrews was going to adapt her screenplay for the stage with L.A. playwright Stanley Bennett Clay. Tony-winning choreographer Wayne Cilento would direct. In May, Pasadena Playhouse announced that "Fools" would fill its Oct. 15 to Nov. 14 slot.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black theater scene in Los Angeles is buzzing. A flock of major productions are opening or reopening soon. These aren't prestigious August Wilson plays at nonprofit theaters. Nor are most of them gospel musicals. Most are commercially intended entertainments, playing houses large enough for producers to make profits, if the shows take off. They're advertised primarily on black radio stations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1990 | RAY LOYND
Willie and his woman, Esther, are standing outside an automatic teller at Vermont and Manchester in South-Central Los Angeles. Willie wants to rob the bank. Esther, leaning on a U.S. postal box, plays along. She knows that Willie is all jive, but she loves him. Two actors, two props. Theater, comedy in this case, can't get more basic than this. "Willie & Esther," at Theatre of Arts, is riotous, seamless, even daring because it pulls out all the emotional stops and triumphs on its own terms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nick Stewart, who played Lightnin' on the "Amos 'n' Andy" television show in the 1950s, is battling to keep the theater he started that spawned the career of many African American actors. Stewart and his family were ousted from their Ebony Showcase Theatre in July when a loan company boarded up the building after the family failed to pay most of its rent on the property for four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1988 | RAY LOYND
The Inner City Cultural Center will be humming tonight. Finally, the marathon is over. The celebration begins. After the staggering production of 107 short plays in a playwright's festival that's been running since Oct. 1, the center's second annual Short Play Competition concludes tonight. The winning playwright, in the middle of a party splashed with champagne, will get more than money can buy: a yearlong writing internship at Warner Bros. Television.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meet "St. Louis" in Long Beach. Long Beach Civic Light Opera has announced a season that will include the first post-Broadway production of "Meet Me in St. Louis" and a new version of "Chess" that's different from the one that's playing Orange County Performing Arts Center this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Residents of a California suburb get ready to welcome a predicted spacecraft landing in Mark McNease's "Over Jordan," a new play that just opened at Friends and Artists Theatre in the Hollywood district. "It's our first original production--after 2 1/2 years of working out different styles and pulling a company together," said Friends and Artists artistic director Sal Romeo.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
According to "Nightside," reporters on the graveyard shift at Chicago police headquarters endure lousy hours, frigid winters, the omnipresence of crime and the knowledge that they're either greenhorns or has-beens. At least the greenhorns can hope for something better. For the has-beens, there's no relief in sight. Philip Reed--who has been there--ably enlivens this grim situation in "Nightside," a duet for greenhorn and has-been at the Burbage.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1989 | T.H. MCCULLOH
It's a fascinating conceit of modern playwrights, this bringing together of unlikely cohorts to thresh out philosophical conundrums, and few have carried off the trick better than Terry Johnson in the West Coast premiere of his "Insignificance" at Al's Bar. It's a talky little play, but that's just fine when the talk is lucid and witty, when the intelligence and poetry of the language so well define the pawns in the game and illuminate the author's themes.
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