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Stanley Bing

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NEWS
March 9, 2000 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We all face ethical dilemmas every day. Should we close the elevator door in someone's face? Should we cut someone off in traffic? Should we, at the drop of a hat, stab a co-worker in the back to advance our own career? For answers, some might ask themselves "WWJD?" The letters stand for "What Would Jesus Do?" The Christian slogan has been invoked lately by everyone from presidential hopefuls George W. Bush and Al Gore to the pop group 'N Sync.
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NEWS
March 9, 2000 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We all face ethical dilemmas every day. Should we close the elevator door in someone's face? Should we cut someone off in traffic? Should we, at the drop of a hat, stab a co-worker in the back to advance our own career? For answers, some might ask themselves "WWJD?" The letters stand for "What Would Jesus Do?" The Christian slogan has been invoked lately by everyone from presidential hopefuls George W. Bush and Al Gore to the pop group 'N Sync.
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BOOKS
June 7, 1992 | KAREN STABINER
CRAZY BOSSES by Stanley Bing (William Morrow: $20; 272 pp.) As a self-employed person, I have the ultimate crazy boss: I rarely give myself a vacation, offer no employee benefits whatsoever, don't have a health plan, and think nothing of asking myself to work nights or weekends at no extra pay. Still, in the Stanley Bing pantheon of nutball big shots, I am a piker.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1992 | MARTHA GROVES and JULIE ROSE
More than 700,000 Californians have lost their jobs in the Great Recession of 1990-92. Give thanks if you're not one. Then get back to work. The days of surging growth and benevolent bosses, long lunches and genial ineptitude are gone. Companies across America have refocused on why they have workers in the first place, and by golly, they're finding that in many cases they don't need them. More and more, showing up on time and putting in 40 hours won't be enough to ensure workplace survival.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | PATRICK MOTT and ANN CONWAY
In a painfully inevitable move, the now-ubiquitous so-called "Hollywood Madam," Heidi Fleiss, recently announced that she would be lending her name to a high-fashion women's lingerie and sleepwear line. Is this the ultimate expression of media-circus-turned-marketing-strategy? Or is the little lady just trying to make good? HE: Well, gee, she certainly has an impressive entrepreneurial pedigree.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of April 13 - 19, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies SERIES Arrow Oliver, Canary, Diggle and Felicity (Stephen Amell, Caity Lotz, David Ramsey, Emily Bett Rickards) confront Slade (Manu Bennett) at the lair, and the resulting battle sends one member of Team Arrow to the hospital. 8 p.m. KTLA American Idol The finalists perform songs selected by their competitors in this new episode.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1992 | Stu Silverstein and Julie Rose
Washing the dishes, making the beds and caring for children are worth big money. Even though housework usually is done for free, its estimated value to the world economy is more than $4 trillion a year. But because governments don't officially place any value on housework, the people who do that unpaid work--mostly women--get a raw deal when it comes to divorce, Social Security and legislation affecting their interests, say women's rights advocates. To get homemakers their due, Rep.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, Paul Brownfield is a Times staff writer
With "The Sopranos," TV's Great American Novel, and "Sex and the City," a hit comedy of manners, orgasms and women's shoes, HBO has become the literary magazine of series television. Serialized within its pages are "Oz," Tom Fontana's innovative, brutal look at prison life, and "Curb Your Enthusiasm," an improvised piece of whimsy from Larry David, the author of "Seinfeld." As the pay cable network's ad campaign now tells us: "It's not TV, it's HBO."
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