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April 13, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
In more ways than one, the persistence of vision is what makes movies work. A trick of the eye makes a fast succession of still pictures seem to move. A persistent vision gets movies made, even if the planning and the peddling takes years. "The Last Temptation of Christ" was a dream of Martin Scorsese's for a decade or more, before his persistence paid off. Similar tales are part of Hollywood legend. Stanley Chase, a producer not widely known outside industry circles, has had a persistent and probably obsessive feeling about the Kurt Weill-Bertolt Brecht "The Threepenny Opera" since he first heard the original 1928 version on 78 r.p.m.
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SPORTS
April 17, 1990 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Webster and Terry Crisp, a study in contrast. One is moving on in the Stanley Cup playoffs, while the other might be moving out altogether. Webster appears calm, almost studious on the bench, while Crisp is fiery, emotional and loud. Webster is the epitome of decorum in public; Crisp was embarrassed during the series between the Kings and Calgary Flames by getting caught wiping his nose with his necktie on television. But don't be fooled.
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SPORTS
April 17, 1990 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Webster and Terry Crisp, a study in contrast. One is moving on in the Stanley Cup playoffs, while the other might be moving out altogether. Webster appears calm, almost studious on the bench, while Crisp is fiery, emotional and loud. Webster is the epitome of decorum in public; Crisp was embarrassed during the series between the Kings and Calgary Flames by getting caught wiping his nose with his necktie on television. But don't be fooled.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
In more ways than one, the persistence of vision is what makes movies work. A trick of the eye makes a fast succession of still pictures seem to move. A persistent vision gets movies made, even if the planning and the peddling takes years. "The Last Temptation of Christ" was a dream of Martin Scorsese's for a decade or more, before his persistence paid off. Similar tales are part of Hollywood legend. Stanley Chase, a producer not widely known outside industry circles, has had a persistent and probably obsessive feeling about the Kurt Weill-Bertolt Brecht "The Threepenny Opera" since he first heard the original 1928 version on 78 r.p.m.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | DIANE REISCHEL, Times Staff Writer
Dorothy Rice had the right qualifications for the moment: "I had a very voluptuous body, with a young, very blank face." And somehow designer Christian Dior saw in this Brooklyn teen-ager the right face and body for his legendary "new look"--the ultrafeminine, hourglass style that set the fashion tone for the 1950s. The daughter of a New York artist, Rice, a fledgling fashion model at 16, suddenly found her image--adorned in Dior--in pages of Vogue and numerous European magazines.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2012 | By David Sarno
Facebook Inc. is boosting the size of its initial public stock offering by about 25%, bringing the number of shares that will go on sale to 421 million, according to a report from CNBC. The social networking giant, which is widely expected to begin selling shares Friday, had earlier planned to make 337.4 million shares available, including 157 million owned by existing shareholders. In a regulatory filing Tuesday, Facebook said the shares will be priced between $34 and $38 , a step up from the $28 to $35 range the company had initially projected.  RELATED: Road to IPO At those prices, the IPO of 421 million shares could raise as much as $15 billion, with more than half of that being earned by Facebook.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2008 | the associated press
Despite the Wall Street meltdown, the nation's biggest banks are preparing to pay their workers as much as last year or more, including bonuses tied to personal and company performance. So far this year, nine of the largest U.S. banks, including some that have cut thousands of jobs, have seen total costs for salaries, benefits and bonuses grow by an average of 3% from a year ago, according to an Associated Press review.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Occidental Petroleum agreed Thursday to buy a chemicals company in a deal worth more than $2 billion, further boosting Oxy's presence in the chemicals industry while turning a huge profit for a group of investors in Houston and New York. Occidental said it will pay $1.25 billion in cash for Cain Chemical Inc., one of the nation's largest producers of ethylene and other products. The Los Angeles company will also assume Cain's debt of $830 million.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Forget about Henry Kravis and Stephen Schwarzman. Mergers and acquisitions may set a worldwide record of more than $3.57 trillion before this year ends without a megadeal from the kings of leveraged buyouts. Bankers specializing in mergers and acquisitions need to drum up only $486 billion in transactions during the next four months to boost fee revenue to more than $11 billion for the first time, data compiled by Bloomberg News show.
SPORTS
April 29, 1992 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Messier is in New York. Grant Fuhr and Glenn Anderson are in Toronto. Five other key players from the Edmonton Oilers' glory days of the last decade--Wayne Gretzky, Jari Kurri, Paul Coffey, Charlie Huddy and Marty McSorley--are in Los Angeles, playing for the Kings. And still the Oilers took the Kings out of the playoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' new summer screening series, the Last 70mm Film Festival, isn't heralding the death knell of celluloid but rather celebrating the wonder of filmmaking on a grand scale. "There is so much talk about the death of film, period, let alone 70-millimeter film, I wanted to make sure we celebrated 70 millimeter for the really terrific medium that it is," said academy programmer Randy Haberkamp. "We certainly admire and appreciate what is going on in the digital revolution," said Haberkamp.
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