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Stanley Cortez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cinematographer Stanley Cortez, whose powerful images in such American classics as "The Magnificent Ambersons" and "Night of the Hunter" won him top honors, has died. He was 89. Working with such directors as Orson Welles, Fritz Lang and Samuel Fuller, Cortez distinguished himself as an artist of great ability.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1955, when "The Night of the Hunter" opened to mixed reviews and poor box office, the film was already a throwback: steeped in the luxuriant gloom of German Expressionism and the heightened poetics of D.W. Griffith (and set to boot in rural Depression-era America). But in reaching back to the primordial enchantment and promise of silent-era cinema, director Charles Laughton created something timeless ? "a nightmarish sort of Mother Goose tale," as he put it, but also an American Gothic variation on an Old Testament parable.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
"LIGHT is an incredible thing that can't be described," cinematographer Stanley Cortez once said. "Only two of the directors I've worked with have understood it: Orson Welles and Charles Laughton." During his 50-year career, Cortez was known for his mastery of composition, deep focus and light in such atmospheric black-and-white movies as Welles' 1942 drama, "The Magnificent Ambersons," and Laughton's only film as a director, the sinister 1955 thriller "The Night of the Hunter."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
"LIGHT is an incredible thing that can't be described," cinematographer Stanley Cortez once said. "Only two of the directors I've worked with have understood it: Orson Welles and Charles Laughton." During his 50-year career, Cortez was known for his mastery of composition, deep focus and light in such atmospheric black-and-white movies as Welles' 1942 drama, "The Magnificent Ambersons," and Laughton's only film as a director, the sinister 1955 thriller "The Night of the Hunter."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1990 | STEVEN C. SMITH
The life of cinematographer Stanley Cortez is filled with images as powerful as those he created in such classic films as "The Magnificent Ambersons," "Night of the Hunter" and "Since You Went Away."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1955, when "The Night of the Hunter" opened to mixed reviews and poor box office, the film was already a throwback: steeped in the luxuriant gloom of German Expressionism and the heightened poetics of D.W. Griffith (and set to boot in rural Depression-era America). But in reaching back to the primordial enchantment and promise of silent-era cinema, director Charles Laughton created something timeless ? "a nightmarish sort of Mother Goose tale," as he put it, but also an American Gothic variation on an Old Testament parable.
MAGAZINE
November 11, 1990
Scorsese professes affection for "The Naked Kiss" and its startling opening sequence. True to the auteurist party line, he credits directors Sam Fuller while failing to mention other key contributors to the scene's visceral impact: Stanley Cortez and his bravura camera work, the fierce, fearless acting of Constance Towers and particularly the frenzied, full-throttle jazz music of brilliant, unsung movie composer Paul Dunlap. Let us not forget that it takes more than one artist's passion to create a film canvas.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | Kevin Thomas
Although reams have been written about the mutilation of Orson Welles' second feature, what remains of it is nevertheless a major accomplishment, an elegiac saga of the decline and fall of a rich small-town American family, based on a Booth Tarkington novel. Notable for its dramatic black-and-white cinematography by Stanley Cortez. Representing three generations of Ambersons are Richard Bennett, Dolores Costello and Tim Holt, with a starring turn by Agnes Moorehead (pictured).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cinematographers Winners: Haskell Wexler's atmospheric camerawork on "Blaze" was voted best theatrical release by the American Society of Cinematographers Sunday night. Gayne Rescher's work on "Single Women, Married Men" won best movie of the week, and a "Murder, She Wrote" episode, "Night of the Tarantula" photographed by John Elsenbach, won as a regular series.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
UCLA began its "Mexican Film and the Literary Tradition" series Thursday by honoring a legendary cinematographer. Gabriel Figueroa, who was behind the camera on "Los Olvidados," "The Pearl" and John Huston's "Night of the Iguana," was on hand at the Motion Picture Academy's theater to receive praise from 450 guests at the post-tribute reception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cinematographer Stanley Cortez, whose powerful images in such American classics as "The Magnificent Ambersons" and "Night of the Hunter" won him top honors, has died. He was 89. Working with such directors as Orson Welles, Fritz Lang and Samuel Fuller, Cortez distinguished himself as an artist of great ability.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1990 | STEVEN C. SMITH
The life of cinematographer Stanley Cortez is filled with images as powerful as those he created in such classic films as "The Magnificent Ambersons," "Night of the Hunter" and "Since You Went Away."
NEWS
November 26, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Evelyn Venable, Shakespearean actress and later a professor of classics who played ingenue film roles in the 1930s and was believed to be the model for Columbia Pictures' statuesque movie logo, has died. She was 80. Miss Venable, the widow of Academy Award-winning cinematographer Hal Mohr, died of cancer Nov. 16 at the home of a daughter in Post Falls, Ida.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Alonzo, known as one of Hollywood's most thorough cameramen with a gifted eye for light and color demonstrated in such films as "Chinatown," has died. He was 66. Alonzo, nominated for an Academy Award for his work on the Roman Polanski film noir, which starred Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway, died Tuesday in Los Angeles.
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