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Stanley Crouch

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NEWS
June 7, 1990
Stanley Crouch's singular goal appears to be to perform some sort of a sadomasochistic ritual on the black race, in particular black literary figures ("Crouch to the Contrary," May 21). Nothing is cheaper than an analysis of a problem with no problem- solving plan of action behind it. Crouch's observations have degenerated to so much gibberish, given the absence of any solutions. Rather than offering solutions, he is spewing a form of literary cancer exactly like the forms he attacks--i.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The termination of Stanley Crouch's column in Jazz Times magazine has aroused a tempest in the normally placid waters of the jazz world, as well as a typically no-holds-barred response from the veteran New York-based critic and author "I think that what they wanted to do was just get rid of me," he said last week by phone.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1995
As a black Vietnam veteran, I find it incredible that a "professional cultural critic" such as Stanley Crouch would try to interpret and distort the articulate words of Louis Farrakhan in order to further his own agenda ("To look upon Farrakhan As Any Kind of Solution Is Condescending," Sept. 30). In the 66 years of the Nation of Islam, there is no history of violence against whites of any persuasion. Any comparison of Farrakhan to David Duke, who led the Ku Klux Klan and identified with the Nazis, is absurd.
BOOKS
May 14, 2000 | JONATHAN LEVI
Stanley Crouch is a musician and a scholar. A sometime jazz musician and critic, Crouch has made a name for himself in recent years as the resident intellectual behind trumpeter and impresario Wynton Marsalis' series "Jazz at Lincoln Center." His sparkling and provocative essays, delivered on TV as often as in print, have ranged over the vast plains of American history, from the writing of the U.S. Constitution to the filmmaking of Quentin Tarantino.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The termination of Stanley Crouch's column in Jazz Times magazine has aroused a tempest in the normally placid waters of the jazz world, as well as a typically no-holds-barred response from the veteran New York-based critic and author "I think that what they wanted to do was just get rid of me," he said last week by phone.
BOOKS
May 14, 2000 | JONATHAN LEVI
Stanley Crouch is a musician and a scholar. A sometime jazz musician and critic, Crouch has made a name for himself in recent years as the resident intellectual behind trumpeter and impresario Wynton Marsalis' series "Jazz at Lincoln Center." His sparkling and provocative essays, delivered on TV as often as in print, have ranged over the vast plains of American history, from the writing of the U.S. Constitution to the filmmaking of Quentin Tarantino.
NEWS
May 21, 1990 | ITABARI NJERI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, "here I go with the written part," the main theme, says essayist and jazz critic Stanley Crouch. "Then I'm going to step out," lay out some variations and riffs. The crowd is with him, smiling, nodding, although most conferences on race relations--especially sessions sponsored by the neo-conservative National Forum Foundation in Washington--seldom get this swinging a keynote speaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1994
Stanley Crouch's masterful "Pulp Friction" (Film Comment, Oct. 16) further validates the MacArthur Foundation's wisdom in acknowledging this world citizen's contributions to art and understanding. What begins as a literate and informative en carriere review of Quentin Tarantino's movies quickly becomes an enlightening essay in American social philosophy, superior in clarity and understanding. Crouch's analysis furthers our understanding of what he calls "ethnic complexity," the blurring and marbling of white and black.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991
T imes staff writer Itabari Njeri's commentary on Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever" ("Doing the Wrong Thing," June 23) has prompted an outpouring from readers, with responses supporting Lee outnumbering those supporting Njeri about 2 to 1. A sampling: A Too-Personal Attack At first I thought I was reading the ultraconservative National Review picking apart Lee as an "infantile black nationalist" and undermining his credibility by...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1998
Having seen both "He Got Game" and "Bulworth," I read Stanley Crouch's commentary with interest ("Beatty, Lee and Their Worlds of Blackness," June 13). Given that Crouch is a well-known writer and social critic, his rather involved comparison of the two films is surely intellectual. However, is he comparing apples and oranges? While "He Got Game" is a seriously beautiful film about current racial and class inequities, "Bulworth" is a farce. It seems to this average filmgoer that both Warren Beatty and Spike Lee produced movies with a message.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1998
Having seen both "He Got Game" and "Bulworth," I read Stanley Crouch's commentary with interest ("Beatty, Lee and Their Worlds of Blackness," June 13). Given that Crouch is a well-known writer and social critic, his rather involved comparison of the two films is surely intellectual. However, is he comparing apples and oranges? While "He Got Game" is a seriously beautiful film about current racial and class inequities, "Bulworth" is a farce. It seems to this average filmgoer that both Warren Beatty and Spike Lee produced movies with a message.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last February, facing a challenge from a new Sunday night edition of "Dateline NBC," "60 Minutes" executive producer Don Hewitt announced the first changes on the CBS newsmagazine in many years. In addition to adding more breaking-news stories to the mix, three prominent commentators from print journalism--Molly Ivins, P.J. O'Rourke and Stanley Crouch--were hired to do weekly commentary.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a challenge from "Dateline NBC" this spring, CBS' "60 Minutes" is being revamped for the first time in many years and will feature more breaking news and more commentary. Among the changes outlined to the show's staff Wednesday by executive producer Don Hewitt was the inclusion of one breaking-news story each week and the use of CBS correspondents outside the "60 Minutes" stable to report some of those pieces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1995
As a black Vietnam veteran, I find it incredible that a "professional cultural critic" such as Stanley Crouch would try to interpret and distort the articulate words of Louis Farrakhan in order to further his own agenda ("To look upon Farrakhan As Any Kind of Solution Is Condescending," Sept. 30). In the 66 years of the Nation of Islam, there is no history of violence against whites of any persuasion. Any comparison of Farrakhan to David Duke, who led the Ku Klux Klan and identified with the Nazis, is absurd.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1994
Stanley Crouch's masterful "Pulp Friction" (Film Comment, Oct. 16) further validates the MacArthur Foundation's wisdom in acknowledging this world citizen's contributions to art and understanding. What begins as a literate and informative en carriere review of Quentin Tarantino's movies quickly becomes an enlightening essay in American social philosophy, superior in clarity and understanding. Crouch's analysis furthers our understanding of what he calls "ethnic complexity," the blurring and marbling of white and black.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991
T imes staff writer Itabari Njeri's commentary on Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever" ("Doing the Wrong Thing," June 23) has prompted an outpouring from readers, with responses supporting Lee outnumbering those supporting Njeri about 2 to 1. A sampling: A Too-Personal Attack At first I thought I was reading the ultraconservative National Review picking apart Lee as an "infantile black nationalist" and undermining his credibility by...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a challenge from "Dateline NBC" this spring, CBS' "60 Minutes" is being revamped for the first time in many years and will feature more breaking news and more commentary. Among the changes outlined to the show's staff Wednesday by executive producer Don Hewitt was the inclusion of one breaking-news story each week and the use of CBS correspondents outside the "60 Minutes" stable to report some of those pieces.
NEWS
June 7, 1990
Stanley Crouch's singular goal appears to be to perform some sort of a sadomasochistic ritual on the black race, in particular black literary figures ("Crouch to the Contrary," May 21). Nothing is cheaper than an analysis of a problem with no problem- solving plan of action behind it. Crouch's observations have degenerated to so much gibberish, given the absence of any solutions. Rather than offering solutions, he is spewing a form of literary cancer exactly like the forms he attacks--i.
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