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Stanley Diamond

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1986
I voted for Proposition 63--the English-only initiative--and I'm glad it passed. However, I hope that Assemblyman Hill, Stanley Diamond and others activists for the proposition will involve themselves just as diligently in encouraging non-English-speaking residents to learn the language, as well as increasing English language classes for those who wish to learn, at reasonable or no cost. Let's make it easier, not more difficult, for people to live here. MRS. TERRY FISHER Los Angeles
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MAGAZINE
June 10, 1990 | SARAH HENRY, Sarah Henry is a staff writer with the Center for Investigative Reporting in San Francisco. Melanie Best provided research assistance.
THE TROUBLE BEGAN in an empty patients' room on the third floor of the Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center. Aida Dimaranan, an assistant head nurse on the maternity ward, was taking a dinner break. She didn't want to get too far from the busy unit, so she and two other Filipina nurses sat on the beds, sharing a quick meal and swapping stories about their children's latest antics. They spoke quietly in Tagalog, a language of the Philippines.
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MAGAZINE
June 10, 1990 | SARAH HENRY, Sarah Henry is a staff writer with the Center for Investigative Reporting in San Francisco. Melanie Best provided research assistance.
THE TROUBLE BEGAN in an empty patients' room on the third floor of the Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center. Aida Dimaranan, an assistant head nurse on the maternity ward, was taking a dinner break. She didn't want to get too far from the busy unit, so she and two other Filipina nurses sat on the beds, sharing a quick meal and swapping stories about their children's latest antics. They spoke quietly in Tagalog, a language of the Philippines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1986
I voted for Proposition 63--the English-only initiative--and I'm glad it passed. However, I hope that Assemblyman Hill, Stanley Diamond and others activists for the proposition will involve themselves just as diligently in encouraging non-English-speaking residents to learn the language, as well as increasing English language classes for those who wish to learn, at reasonable or no cost. Let's make it easier, not more difficult, for people to live here. MRS. TERRY FISHER Los Angeles
NEWS
May 24, 1987
Atty. Gen. John Van de Kamp said the "English-only" measure passed by voters Nov. 4 does not prevent San Francisco from using ballots published in English and containing translations into other languages. He issued the research memorandum--which does not carry the force of law--in response to questions raised by Stanley Diamond of San Francisco. He was one of the leaders of the successful campaign for Proposition 63, which made English the state's official language.
OPINION
August 2, 1987
Thank you, Gov. Deukmejian, for your veto of the bilingual bill. Present bilingual education in California is a $500-million failure. We want effective bilingual education for our immigrant children, not the "make jobs" program. Supporters of your veto are 110,000 members of U.S. English in California, the 5,016,556 voters who said yes to Proposition 63 (making English the official language of California), thousands of parents of our immigrant children and the majority of bilingual teachers in the system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1995
May I clear up one exception to the otherwise fair report (March 10) of the State Education Committee hearing in Sacramento. We are not an "English-only" organization. All languages and cultures are treasures in our country and should be preserved. They are us. We say it loudly and we endlessly repeat, languages and cultures should be preserved but these are not government responsibilities. These belong in the home, church, synagogue, private schools and ethnic celebrations. We want English as the language of government and the common language of communication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors declined to file charges Thursday against a Palmdale man arrested in the shooting death of a popular children's train ride engineer during a robbery in Griffith Park. John B. Moore, 28, who was formerly a train engineer on children's rides in the park, remained jailed on traffic warrants after the decision by the district attorney's office. "We've declined to file charges," district attorney's spokeswoman Sandi Gibbons said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1988
The Los Angeles Unified School District's bilingual education program is now in place. It is a disaster. That's the only label that fits the bilingual education program. For our immigrant children and their mostly unknowing parents, teaching English in the child's native language is the only method to be used in the Los Angeles School District. The victory is historic for the bilingual education power lobby. They salivate at the useless jobs the program creates. Our immigrant children are numbers to be tossed around for jobs, not precious persons to educate for their futures.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A proposal pending before a state education committee that would shift decisions about how to teach bilingual education to local school districts drew the support of English-only advocates for the first time on Thursday. But the policy committee of the State Board of Education backed away from the plan, with members saying they want to consult further with new state schools Supt. Delaine Eastin--who supports bilingual education--before voting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1994
One of the most powerful images in our folklore is that of the destitute and downtrodden immigrant arriving in the United States in search of the American dream. Through hard work and determination, the immigrant finds a job, a place to live, a school to send the children. Above all, the immigrant learns English and eventually assimilates into the American way of life. To many of today's immigrants, those images are merely an out-dated myth.
NEWS
September 26, 1986 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Declaring it would "enshrine prejudice in the law," California's Roman Catholic bishops on Thursday announced their opposition to Proposition 63, the proposal on the November ballot that would establish English as the official language of California. Although the proposed state constitutional amendment "appears at first glance to be innocuous," the statement by the bishops' California Catholic Conference said, "closer scrutiny reveals very negative implications."
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