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Stanley Fischer

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BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Stanley Fischer, the former Bank of Israel president nominated for the Federal Reserve's No. 2 job, defended his work on Wall Street and told senators at his confirmation hearing Thursday that he understood the effect of economic problems on average Americans. Pressed more by Democrats than Republicans on his background, Fischer said his tenure as vice chairman of Citigroup Inc. from 2002 to 2005 was key to his ability to oversee financial institutions as a central banker.
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BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Stanley Fischer, the former Bank of Israel president nominated for the Federal Reserve's No. 2 job, defended his work on Wall Street and told senators at his confirmation hearing Thursday that he understood the effect of economic problems on average Americans. Pressed more by Democrats than Republicans on his background, Fischer said his tenure as vice chairman of Citigroup Inc. from 2002 to 2005 was key to his ability to oversee financial institutions as a central banker.
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WORLD
January 29, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Bank of Israel chief Stanley Fischer, who is widely credited with shepherding Israel through the international credit crunch four years ago, said he would resign from his post in June. Fischer, who was appointed in 2005, gave no reason for his departure, but he had previously hinted that he did not expect to complete his second five-year term, which began in 2010. Under Fischer, Israel maintained a steady, conservative monetary policy with impressive economic growth and low inflation.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The nomination of former Bank of Israel head Stanley Fischer to be Janet Yellen's lieutenant gives the Federal Reserve a "Dream Team" in the top two positions,  Pimco Chief Executive Mohamed El-Erian said Monday. Fischer was the "most inspired choice" of a slate of three nominees announced Friday by the White House, El-Erian said in an opinion column for CNBC. The others were former Treasury official Lael Brainard, and Jerome Powell, a Fed governor since 2012 whose term expires on Jan. 31. El-Erian said the three nominees "form a well-balanced and strong slate at a particularly important time for Fed policy.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The nomination of former Bank of Israel head Stanley Fischer to be Janet Yellen's lieutenant gives the Federal Reserve a "Dream Team" in the top two positions,  Pimco Chief Executive Mohamed El-Erian said Monday. Fischer was the "most inspired choice" of a slate of three nominees announced Friday by the White House, El-Erian said in an opinion column for CNBC. The others were former Treasury official Lael Brainard, and Jerome Powell, a Fed governor since 2012 whose term expires on Jan. 31. El-Erian said the three nominees "form a well-balanced and strong slate at a particularly important time for Fed policy.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - President Obama will nominate Stanley Fischer, the former head of the Bank of Israel, to be vice chair of the Federal Reserve, and also tapped two others for seats on the central bank's Board of Governors, the White House said. Lael Brainard, who stepped down in November as Treasury undersecretary for international affairs, was chosen to fill one of the vacant seats on the seven-member Fed board. Jerome H. Powell, a former Treasury official and investment banker who has served on the Fed board since 2012, will be renominated.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2001 | Reuters
Stanley Fischer, the second in command at the International Monetary Fund, announced his resignation after seven years of fixing myriad financial crises that earned him the nickname "battlefield medic" of the world economy. As the IMF's first deputy managing director, Fischer was the mastermind behind a slew of multibillion-dollar rescue packages in recent years. "The decision to leave was not reached lightly and was reached with very mixed emotions," Fischer said at a news briefing.
WORLD
August 4, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- When Stanley Fischer announced in January that he planned to step down from his post as governor of the Bank of Israel, commentators suggested that replacing the iconic economist credited with the country's economic performance could be a challenge -- but no one thought it would be so difficult, or dramatic. After two candidates graciously accepted the prestigious nomination only to back out under graceless circumstances, the issue is fast becoming a public and political fiasco, raising questions about government judgment and chronic procedural problems in top public appointments.  The first, Yakov Frenkel , who already filled the post in the 1990s, withdrew his candidacy after allegations arose of a shoplifting incident seven years earlier at the Hong-Kong airport's duty-free shop.  The second veteran economist, Leonardo Leiderman, cited "personal reasons" for his withdrawal amid local press murmurs of a past sexual harassment claim . The appointments, made by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Finance Minister Yair Lapid, were subject to the approval of an advisory committee on senior positions headed by a retired Supreme Court justice.
OPINION
November 8, 1998 | Adrian Wooldridge, Adrian Wooldridge, West Coast bureau chief for the Economist, is coauthor of "The Witch Doctors: Making Sense of the Management Gurus."
Stanley Fischer does not look like the sort of man who can move markets or bring demonstrators into the streets. He is polite to the point of being reserved and soft-spoken to the point of being inaudible. At public gatherings, he gives the distinct impression that he would be happier reading a book. But, as first deputy managing director of the International Monetary Fund in Washington, D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Bruce Springsteen says he will match the $10,000 raised at a benefit concert Sunday for an organization that helps unemployed workers and their families. Springsteen has been supplementing state funding for the nonprofit Worker Resource Center over the last three years, group director Stanley Fischer said. During the benefit, the rock star called Fischer from California, where he is recording an album, and pledged to match whatever amount was raised, Fischer said.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - President Obama will nominate Stanley Fischer, the former head of the Bank of Israel, to be vice chair of the Federal Reserve, and also tapped two others for seats on the central bank's Board of Governors, the White House said. Lael Brainard, who stepped down in November as Treasury undersecretary for international affairs, was chosen to fill one of the vacant seats on the seven-member Fed board. Jerome H. Powell, a former Treasury official and investment banker who has served on the Fed board since 2012, will be renominated.
WORLD
August 4, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- When Stanley Fischer announced in January that he planned to step down from his post as governor of the Bank of Israel, commentators suggested that replacing the iconic economist credited with the country's economic performance could be a challenge -- but no one thought it would be so difficult, or dramatic. After two candidates graciously accepted the prestigious nomination only to back out under graceless circumstances, the issue is fast becoming a public and political fiasco, raising questions about government judgment and chronic procedural problems in top public appointments.  The first, Yakov Frenkel , who already filled the post in the 1990s, withdrew his candidacy after allegations arose of a shoplifting incident seven years earlier at the Hong-Kong airport's duty-free shop.  The second veteran economist, Leonardo Leiderman, cited "personal reasons" for his withdrawal amid local press murmurs of a past sexual harassment claim . The appointments, made by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Finance Minister Yair Lapid, were subject to the approval of an advisory committee on senior positions headed by a retired Supreme Court justice.
WORLD
January 29, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Bank of Israel chief Stanley Fischer, who is widely credited with shepherding Israel through the international credit crunch four years ago, said he would resign from his post in June. Fischer, who was appointed in 2005, gave no reason for his departure, but he had previously hinted that he did not expect to complete his second five-year term, which began in 2010. Under Fischer, Israel maintained a steady, conservative monetary policy with impressive economic growth and low inflation.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2001 | Reuters
Stanley Fischer, the second in command at the International Monetary Fund, announced his resignation after seven years of fixing myriad financial crises that earned him the nickname "battlefield medic" of the world economy. As the IMF's first deputy managing director, Fischer was the mastermind behind a slew of multibillion-dollar rescue packages in recent years. "The decision to leave was not reached lightly and was reached with very mixed emotions," Fischer said at a news briefing.
OPINION
November 8, 1998 | Adrian Wooldridge, Adrian Wooldridge, West Coast bureau chief for the Economist, is coauthor of "The Witch Doctors: Making Sense of the Management Gurus."
Stanley Fischer does not look like the sort of man who can move markets or bring demonstrators into the streets. He is polite to the point of being reserved and soft-spoken to the point of being inaudible. At public gatherings, he gives the distinct impression that he would be happier reading a book. But, as first deputy managing director of the International Monetary Fund in Washington, D.C.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A high-level delegation from the Soviet Union's Ministry of Defense began a crash course Monday at Harvard University on the role of the military in a democracy. The privately funded, two-week program brings 28 Soviet officers to Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government for classes ranging from a primer on the U.S. Constitution to lessons of the wars in Vietnam, Afghanistan and the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
The International Monetary Fund approved a $4.5-billion financial package for Russia on Wednesday aimed at helping to keep the country afloat through its December parliamentary elections and presidential voting scheduled for June 2000. About $640 million would be made available immediately, said an IMF spokeswoman. Other installments will be paid out during the next 17 months, she said.
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