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Stanley Goldblum

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BUSINESS
October 16, 1987
Stanley Goldblum has resigned as president, chief operating officer and a director of Century MediCorp, to pursue other business interests. Jacob Y. Terner, the Los Angeles company's chairman and CEO, has assumed the responsibilities of president and chief operating officer. Century MediCorp owns and operates East Los Angeles Doctors Hospital and manages seven medical centers.
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BUSINESS
June 1, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neurosurgeon accused of masterminding one of the biggest workers' compensation scams in Southern California in the late 1980s and early 1990s has been hit with additional criminal charges in the alleged fraud. The expanded indictment announced Friday by the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office against the doctor, David Gardner, 53, also named two new defendants in the case.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles man with links to notorious fraud schemes was arrested Tuesday for allegedly submitting false information to obtain a $150,000 loan from a Costa Mesa lender. Stanley Goldblum, 72, was arrested as he was attending a court hearing in Los Angeles on unrelated charges that he participated in a scheme to operate a number of medical clinics that allegedly bilked the workers' compensation system, Costa Mesa police said. Goldblum was out on $2 million bail stemming from that case.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Primedex Corp., one of the biggest and most controversial workers' compensation medical enterprises in Southern California, announced Thursday that it is pulling out of the business of treating injured employees. The Culver City-based firm--whose referral and billing practices are under investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office--said it will lay off 225 of its 300 employees.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neurosurgeon who founded one of the biggest and most controversial workers' compensation medical enterprises in Southern California during the early 1990s has been charged in what authorities are calling a $4.2-million tax-fraud and money-laundering conspiracy. The Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced Wednesday that it filed five felony counts against David G. Gardner, the Los Angeles doctor who founded the chain of workers' compensation clinics known as Primedex Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert M. Loeffler, an attorney and court-appointed trustee praised for restructuring the scandal-ridden Equity Funding Corp. of America life insurance and securities firm in the mid-1970s after it was caught writing fictitious insurance policies to inflate assets, has died. He was 79. Loeffler died Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of cancer, said his longtime friend and colleague, attorney William D. Gould.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
When John E. Anderson visited China a few years ago, he saw thousands of women wearing colorful nylon hats with wide brims. He especially liked the hats because they folded up compactly, so the attorney and entrepreneur made arrangements to import them to the United States. But when he returned home to Los Angeles, Anderson, an avid mail-order shopper, discovered Bloomingdale's had beat him to the idea--the New York retail chain featured the hats in one of its mail-order catalogues.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN Times Staff Writer
Turn on daytime television, and it's seemingly impossible to miss the commercials. A helicopter newsman bursts onto the screen, "reporting" for something called "Injury Central." Soon a worker appears, writhing in pain after tumbling to the pavement while unloading a truck. And then comes the pitch: Call Injury Central toll-free to get "all the medical and monetary benefits available through your employer's insurance. This means no cost to you. You owe it to yourself and those who count on you."
BUSINESS
April 29, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. P. Morgan was accused of selling defective carbines to the Army, setting up an illegal steel trust and running the financial world like a puppeteer. Today he's largely remembered as the financier who averted a financial panic, enabled the U.S. Treasury to refinance its debts and helped build the American empire. The passage of years may similarly polish the reputation of Michael Milken, the junk bond pioneer who pleaded guilty to federal felony charges last week. But only if he's lucky.
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