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Stanley H Durwood

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanley H. Durwood, the man who is credited with developing the concept of multiplex theaters, has been the target of many a moviegoer's wrath. And yet, in Hollywood circles he is praised for almost single-handedly rescuing the theater business from obsolescence. Ticket-buyers disparage him because he started the trend toward tiny movie theaters--something he has moved away from in recent years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanley H. Durwood, the man who is credited with developing the concept of multiplex theaters, has been the target of many a moviegoer's wrath. And yet, in Hollywood circles he is praised for almost single-handedly rescuing the theater business from obsolescence. Ticket-buyers disparage him because he started the trend toward tiny movie theaters--something he has moved away from in recent years.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
For decades, Stanley H. Durwood has bent his considerable will to the task of building a movie theater empire worthy of posterity. At 67, the Harvard-educated Durwood is a company patriarch whose 87%-owned AMC Entertainment ranks as the second-largest theater chain in the nation. But AMC now is at a crossroads, burdened by debt and the possibility that it chose the wrong cities for its aggressive expansion that more than doubled the chain to 1,493 screens in five years.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
For decades, Stanley H. Durwood has bent his considerable will to the task of building a movie theater empire worthy of posterity. At 67, the Harvard-educated Durwood is a company patriarch whose 87%-owned AMC Entertainment ranks as the second-largest theater chain in the nation. But AMC now is at a crossroads, burdened by debt and the possibility that it chose the wrong cities for its aggressive expansion that more than doubled the chain to 1,493 screens in five years.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1988 | Associated Press \f7
Ron D. Leslie, president of one of the nation's largest theater chains, AMC Entertainment Inc., is resigning after 18 years with the company, officials announced Tuesday. Leslie, who was also chief operating officer, plans to pursue other opportunities in the entertainment industry, said Stanley H. Durwood, AMC chairman and chief executive. Durwood will become president, and William Doeren was named the new chief operating officer. Doeren is a senior vice president of operations and a director.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Columbia Pictures Entertainment, the giant entertainment company newly formed by the merger of Tri-Star Pictures and Columbia Pictures Industries, is believed to be discussing the formation of a joint venture to operate a Philadelphia movie theater chain, industry sources said Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Characterizing the growing cost of making movies as a "huge, hairy beast slouching toward the future," Jack Valenti, president and CEO of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, announced here Tuesday that the average cost of producing and marketing a studio movie in 1995 soared to $54.1 million. Filmmaking costs have risen steadily, up from last year's average cost of $50 million, Valenti told the annual convention of the National Assn. of Theater Owners at the opening of NATO/ShoWest '96.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sony Corp. scored a victory in the digital movie soundtrack wars Wednesday by signing an estimated $25-million deal to install its Sony Dynamic Digital Sound system in AMC Entertainment theaters. The agreement calls for AMC to purchase 1,700 SDDS digital film playback units for exclusive use in its theaters. The Kansas City, Mo.-based chain has 1,618 screens, with roughly 400 more planned or under construction.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1997 | JAMES BATES
For investors, buying stocks in movie exhibitors is no longer an edge-of-your-seat experience. A decade ago, the virtual demise of movie houses was predicted, what with the proliferation of video and laserdisc equipment, direct-broadcast satellite sets, and home theater systems boasting of top-quality sound. One consultant's dismal report predicted that by the late 1990s, theaters as we know them would practically be extinct.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1986 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Not so long ago, a movie theater owner was likely to put on a long face and tattered clothes before meeting with a Hollywood film distributor anxious to know how well his film was doing. The theater owner would bemoan movie attendance, insist that he was subsisting on popcorn sales--and then drive off in a Rolls-Royce. At least that's the story Don Harris tells about the way owners once masked their theaters' success.
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