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Stanley Jordan

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
G enius is a word too often tossed around in musical circles, but it has been applied rightfully to Stanley Jordan, the guitar virtuoso whose first televised concert will be aired at 7 tonight on the Bravo cable channel. "Stanley Jordan" was taped during his appearance last year at the Theatre St. Denis during the Montreal Jazz Festival. (It will be repeated at 12:30 a.m.
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NEWS
March 21, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stanley Jordan is making one of his occasional solo appearances in the Southland this week, displaying what is surely one of the most unusual instrumental techniques in any genre of music. His opening-night set at the Jazz Bakery offered a characteristic display of his "tapping" method of guitar playing, in which he moves both hands freely across the strings, producing notes by tapping the strings onto the frets. The results were startling, even to one who has frequently seen Jordan in action.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1989 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Guitarist Stanley Jordan created a sensation a few years back when he introduced the two-handed tap technique that creates the sound of two or even three guitars played simultaneously. Fears generated by the pop overtones of his latest album, "Flying Home," were allayed Friday at the Coach House, as Jordan dazzled a capacity house with his sleight-of-hand and his rhythmic finesse. Jordan, who brought in Yossi Fine on bass and Cody Moffett on drums, is still his own best accompanist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1996
I read with great interest Don Heckman's review of the Guitar Summit concert at Caltech's Beckman Auditorium ("Four Players, One Remarkable Instrument," March 9). He described Stanley Jordan's guitar-playing style as follows: ". . . he plays the guitar by tapping the strings in two-handed, piano keyboard style, [producing] sounds not quite like anything ever before heard from the instrument." Has Mr. Heckman been living in a soundproof cave for the past 20 years since Eddie Van Halen first introduced "tapping" and "hammering" to the music world?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1995 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's no one quite like Stanley Jordan. He plays the guitar with the multiple moves of a two-handed pianist, in a style that essentially transforms it into a new instrument. Yet, for all his ingenuity and innovation, the 45-year-old artist, with his one-man performance and his shy, almost introverted manner, doesn't seem a likely candidate for the colorfully outgoing stage of the House of Blues. But think again.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
"FLYING HOME." Stanley Jordan. EMI-Manhattan E1 48682. What happens to a dream defaulted? Does it dry up, like a rhythm in the sun? Or does it expire? Four years ago Stanley Jordan was the talk of the jazz world--a 25-year-old Princeton graduate whose revolutionary guitar style enabled him to become a virtual one-man ensemble. By tapping both hands on the fingerboard simultaneously, he performed independent or interrelated parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
He sits huddled alone in the center of the stage, a solo guitarist at work. But something is odd, unusual. Both his hands are wrapped around the neck of his instrument, and all 10 of his fingers are moving independently across the strings, producing a sound so rich and complex that it has audiences peering into the darkness to look for nonexistent accompanists.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Larry Carlton is back and looking good. More than two years after he was shot in the neck by an unknown gunman, the guitarist shows no signs of the trauma he suffered in his voice and left arm. Any questions to the contrary were quickly dispatched at his Universal Amphitheatre concert Saturday night when Carlton opened his set with a whimsical, hard-swinging vocal on "Crazy Momma."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One's a mature country gentleman with several guitars named after him and a laid-back style that mixes equal parts jazz and country. The other's a high-tech kid, a product of the computer age whose playing blends esoteric theory and seemingly impossible techniques. About the only thing Chet Atkins and Stanley Jordan have in common is that they both play guitar, and play it well. But that bond is enough for Atkins, 67, and Jordan, 32, to be members of a mutual admiration society.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT
"Stanley Jordan: Magic Touch." Sony. $16.95. This 19-minute music cassette is strictly for those interested in static close-ups of guitarist Jordan's unusual technique. Instead of strumming or picking, he plays the guitar fretboard like a keyboard. He's like trumpeter Wynton Marsalis--all dazzling technique and no charisma. Jordan's soulless classical approach to jazz is just plain boring. This lifeless production desperately needs flash.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like most political and economic summits, the Guitar Summit promotes understanding and cooperation between very different and sometimes opposing camps. But unlike a lot of other summits, the four-man musical meeting of the minds scheduled to convene Sunday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre--with representatives from jazz, classical and blues-folk-rock factions--is expected to be music to our ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1995 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's no one quite like Stanley Jordan. He plays the guitar with the multiple moves of a two-handed pianist, in a style that essentially transforms it into a new instrument. Yet, for all his ingenuity and innovation, the 45-year-old artist, with his one-man performance and his shy, almost introverted manner, doesn't seem a likely candidate for the colorfully outgoing stage of the House of Blues. But think again.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One's a mature country gentleman with several guitars named after him and a laid-back style that mixes equal parts jazz and country. The other's a high-tech kid, a product of the computer age whose playing blends esoteric theory and seemingly impossible techniques. About the only thing Chet Atkins and Stanley Jordan have in common is that they both play guitar, and play it well. But that bond is enough for Atkins, 67, and Jordan, 32, to be members of a mutual admiration society.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
G enius is a word too often tossed around in musical circles, but it has been applied rightfully to Stanley Jordan, the guitar virtuoso whose first televised concert will be aired at 7 tonight on the Bravo cable channel. "Stanley Jordan" was taped during his appearance last year at the Theatre St. Denis during the Montreal Jazz Festival. (It will be repeated at 12:30 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Larry Carlton is back and looking good. More than two years after he was shot in the neck by an unknown gunman, the guitarist shows no signs of the trauma he suffered in his voice and left arm. Any questions to the contrary were quickly dispatched at his Universal Amphitheatre concert Saturday night when Carlton opened his set with a whimsical, hard-swinging vocal on "Crazy Momma."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1989 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Guitarist Stanley Jordan created a sensation a few years back when he introduced the two-handed tap technique that creates the sound of two or even three guitars played simultaneously. Fears generated by the pop overtones of his latest album, "Flying Home," were allayed Friday at the Coach House, as Jordan dazzled a capacity house with his sleight-of-hand and his rhythmic finesse. Jordan, who brought in Yossi Fine on bass and Cody Moffett on drums, is still his own best accompanist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1996
I read with great interest Don Heckman's review of the Guitar Summit concert at Caltech's Beckman Auditorium ("Four Players, One Remarkable Instrument," March 9). He described Stanley Jordan's guitar-playing style as follows: ". . . he plays the guitar by tapping the strings in two-handed, piano keyboard style, [producing] sounds not quite like anything ever before heard from the instrument." Has Mr. Heckman been living in a soundproof cave for the past 20 years since Eddie Van Halen first introduced "tapping" and "hammering" to the music world?
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stanley Jordan is making one of his occasional solo appearances in the Southland this week, displaying what is surely one of the most unusual instrumental techniques in any genre of music. His opening-night set at the Jazz Bakery offered a characteristic display of his "tapping" method of guitar playing, in which he moves both hands freely across the strings, producing notes by tapping the strings onto the frets. The results were startling, even to one who has frequently seen Jordan in action.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
"FLYING HOME." Stanley Jordan. EMI-Manhattan E1 48682. What happens to a dream defaulted? Does it dry up, like a rhythm in the sun? Or does it expire? Four years ago Stanley Jordan was the talk of the jazz world--a 25-year-old Princeton graduate whose revolutionary guitar style enabled him to become a virtual one-man ensemble. By tapping both hands on the fingerboard simultaneously, he performed independent or interrelated parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
He sits huddled alone in the center of the stage, a solo guitarist at work. But something is odd, unusual. Both his hands are wrapped around the neck of his instrument, and all 10 of his fingers are moving independently across the strings, producing a sound so rich and complex that it has audiences peering into the darkness to look for nonexistent accompanists.
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