Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStanley Kramer
IN THE NEWS

Stanley Kramer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | By ELAINE DUTKA, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Stanley Kramer, the producer-director who earned the nickname "Hollywood's conscience" through his willingness to tackle controversial topics like racism, nuclear annihilation, greed and fascism, died Monday of pneumonia at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills. He was 87. Friends said Kramer, who suffered from diabetes, had been at the hospital for several months. "Kramer was a guy who fought some hard battles," said former Times arts editor Charles Champlin.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2013 | By Susan King
As both a producer and a director, Stanley Kramer was fearless. As a scrappy young independent producer in the late 1940s, he bought the rights to Arthur Laurents' "Home of the Brave," the hit 1946 Broadway play which exposed anti-Semitism in the military during World War II. But Kramer decided to up the ante, transforming it into a drama about racism, casting young African American actor James Edwards as the soldier who must battle discrimination in...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
It was not a label he embraced, but somewhere along the line Stanley Kramer became known as a maker of message movies. In the '50s and '60s, as a producer and director, Kramer (who died in 2001, at age 87) tackled such issues as racial prejudice, fascism, juvenile delinquency and the threat of nuclear annihilation. The Producers Guild of America hands out the Stanley Kramer Award annually for a film that addresses important social issues (this year it went to "The Great Debaters").
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
By all reports, there was barely a sound after the world premiere 50 years ago in Berlin of "Judgment at Nuremberg," producer-director Stanley Kramer's historical drama. The epic was based on the "justice trial" in Nuremberg, Germany, in 1947 against the Nazi regime and those complicit in enforcing government policies including the extermination of 6 million Jews. It had been only 16 years since the end of World War II and 14 years since the trials had taken place when Kramer decided to premiere the film in Germany "in the face of people who had been complicit and lived through the war," said Ellen Harrington, programmer at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which will present a 50th-anniversary tribute to the film Tuesday night at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2001 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood is full of perils for the filmmaker. Not the least of those perils is being ahead of the wave because when the wave breaks it is too easy for the world to forget that you got there first. Stanley Kramer, who died Monday morning at 87, had lived on into an age of film in which battles he won to have his say seem all but meaningless to young filmmakers who can say and do almost anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1997 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a time when Stanley Kramer was called, with some accuracy, "the most picketed producer in America." From "Home of the Brave" (1949), a dramatic exploration of anti-black racism, through 1958's "The Defiant Ones" and even "Inherit the Wind" in 1960, Kramer was as good at raising hackles as at raising grosses. In an era when Hollywood's principal aim was still to divert rather than stir things up, Kramer was the industry's one-man social consciousness, and conscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2011
After producing such classic films as 1950's "The Men" and 1952's "High Noon," Stanley Kramer made his directorial debut with what 1955 film? "Not as a Stranger"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Stanley Kramer--producer-director of "Judgment at Nuremberg" and "Inherit the Wind," for starters--has made arrangements for a film biography of Lech Walesa, a founder of the outlawed Polish Solidarity union. Kramer conferred last week with Walesa in Warsaw along with screenwriter Daniel Taradash (who won an Oscar for "From Here to Eternity") and producer Ralph Andrews. Tentative plans are to film the story in West Germany, Kramer said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Ford in His Future: Former President Gerald Ford will make the presentation when the American Foundation for the Performing Arts gives its lifetime achievement award to veteran producer-director Stanley Kramer at a brunch on March 24. The next evening--Oscar night--Kramer will be guest of honor at the foundation's sold-out $1,000 per plate Oscar-viewing dinner. Proceeds of the event go to the Motion Picture & Television Fund.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Director-producer Stanley Kramer plans to make a film in the Soviet Union about the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster, he said in Moscow on Monday. Attending the 15th annual Moscow Film Festival, Kramer said he has been planning the untitled film for nine months and that he is eager to visit the Chernobyl area and to talk to eyewitnesses of the 1986 disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2011
After producing such classic films as 1950's "The Men" and 1952's "High Noon," Stanley Kramer made his directorial debut with what 1955 film? "Not as a Stranger"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
It was not a label he embraced, but somewhere along the line Stanley Kramer became known as a maker of message movies. In the '50s and '60s, as a producer and director, Kramer (who died in 2001, at age 87) tackled such issues as racial prejudice, fascism, juvenile delinquency and the threat of nuclear annihilation. The Producers Guild of America hands out the Stanley Kramer Award annually for a film that addresses important social issues (this year it went to "The Great Debaters").
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2002 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It was meant to be the movie comedy to end all movie comedies. And clocking in at four hours (plus an intermission) when it opened the Cinerama Dome in 1963, "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" certainly was the longest comedy ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2001
Music fans vote for the "TNN & CMT Country Weekly Music Awards" (8 p.m. TNN), which will be hosted in Nashville by Lee Ann Womack and Terry Bradshaw. Womack, who has a chart-topping hit in "I Hope You Dance," Alan Jackson and Jo Dee Messina are lined up as performers. MOVIES Here's the perfect follow-up to Tuesday's illuminating Cinemax profile of Stanley Kramer. The celebrated director is at the top of his form in five films being rolled out tonight on TCM.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2001 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood is full of perils for the filmmaker. Not the least of those perils is being ahead of the wave because when the wave breaks it is too easy for the world to forget that you got there first. Stanley Kramer, who died Monday morning at 87, had lived on into an age of film in which battles he won to have his say seem all but meaningless to young filmmakers who can say and do almost anything.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2001 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanley Kramer, the producer-director who earned the nickname "Hollywood's conscience" through his willingness to tackle controversial topics like racism, nuclear annihilation, greed and fascism, died Monday of pneumonia at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills. He was 87. Friends said Kramer, who suffered from diabetes, had been at the hospital for several months. "Kramer was a guy who fought some hard battles," said former Times arts editor Charles Champlin.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|