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Stanley Kubrick

ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
A key moment in the history of post-World War II European avant-garde music was when Stanley Kubrick threw out the score that Alex North had written for “2001: A Space Odyssey” and replaced it with the temporary track he had been using. Along with “Also Sprach Zarathustra” and “The Blue Danube” was the Hungarian composer György Ligeti's mysteriously misty “Atmosphéres.” It seemed that everybody and their brother saw the film, and that every college student in America brought the soundtrack.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
He may only be 18, but Nick Robinson can teach you how to skin a rabbit. The trick to the gruesome procedure, the young actor learned while filming the new indie movie "The Kings of Summer," comes at the start - cutting away at the rear flap of skin right above the ankle. "That's the hardest part," said Robinson. "Once you get past the legs, it's just like taking off a sock, a very sticky sock. It's gross. " Separating a dead animal from its hide may have proved Robinson's Bear Grylls-style survival skills but that was a minor difficulty compared with the rest of the challenges Robinson faced on "Kings of Summer," his feature film debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
The debut feature for writer-director Alice Winocour, “Augustine” features a bracing and powerful performance by the young performer known as Soko. Now playing in Los Angeles, the film is set in 19th century France, its story based on the ethically and emotionally complicated relationship that develops between Dr. Jean-Martin Charcot (played by Vincent Lindon) and the young woman (Soko) prone to fits of what was then called “hysteria” who would become his star patient. The scenes of Augustine having fits -- which were created in part by having Soko yanked about by unseen ropes and cables and in part by her yoga-induced flexibility -- are disconcerting to watch.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Susan King
With the Los Angeles County Museum of Art 's expansive "Stanley Kubrick" exhibition set to close on June 30, the museum's film department is revisiting several key movies in the maverick filmmaker's oeuvre. Each of the director's films in the series "Kubrick and Co. " will be paired with an important work by another filmmaker, including Michaelangelo Antonioni ("Red Desert"), Ingmar Bergman ("Hour of the Wolf"), Sam Fuller ("China Gate") and Max Ophuls ("Lola Montes"). The series opens May 31 with Kubrick's 1957 anti-war film, "Paths of Glory," starring Kirk Douglas, followed by Joseph Losey's 1957 drama "Time Without Pity," revolving around a man's (Michael Redgrave)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Whether it's signing his photographs and his books, participating in a documentary or talking at all, Bert Stern can barely be bothered. Which is a flaw that "Bert Stern: Original Mad Man" never overcomes. It's not that Stern didn't take any memorable photographs or lacked for dramatic incident in his life. Quite the contrary. A creator of images who helped revolutionize the use of photography in advertising, he became celebrated for Marilyn Monroe's last sitting as well as the shot that became the celebrated poster for Stanley Kubrick's "Lolita.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Since its release in 1980, Stanley Kubrick's film adaptation of Stephen King's "The Shining" has firmly embedded itself into the pop consciousness with its shudder-inducing cry of "Here's Johnny!" and its blood-soaked hallways. "Room 237," which opens Friday in Los Angeles, digs into five of the myriad theories of interpretation that have sprung up around what is now a modern horror classic. The proponents of these theories, heard only in voice-over, function as narrators as they rather plausibly lay out "The Shining" as a metaphor for the genocide of Native Americans, for the Holocaust, as an exploration of the mythology of the Minotaur and/or as Kubrick's secret confession that he was involved in faking the Apollo 11 moon landing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Stanley Kubrick's 1968 sci-fi epic "2001: A Space Odyssey" had an immediate impact on filmmakers. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art's new series "Beyond the Infinite: Science Fiction After Kubrick," which begins Friday and concludes April 6, features several cerebral, thought-provoking genre films that were inspired by Kubrick's masterpiece. "Beyond the Infinite" is one of many recent LACMA film programs that have enhanced the museum's popular "Stanley Kubrick" exhibition. Bernardo Rondeau, assistant curator of LACMA's film programs, noted that science-fiction films have been popular since the beginning of cinema, with such classics as Georges Melies' 1902 "A Trip to the Moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Having successfully brought Abraham Lincoln to the screen, Steven Spielberg has already set his sights on another titan of history: Napoleon. In an interview with Canal + Television in France, Spielberg, who was recently named  jury head at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival , revealed that he's planning to turn a decades-old screenplay about the French leader written by the late great Stanley Kubrick into a miniseries. “I've been developing Stanley Kubrick's screenplay - for a miniseries not for a motion picture - about the life of Napoleon,” Spielberg said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
As the new year begins, what could be more fitting than a look at the first films of celebrated directors? The folks at Criterion have given us 1998's "Following," the fine independent debut by Christopher Nolan, who shot it over a year while he was in film school in London. Going even further back, Kino is releasing Stanley Kubrick's "Fear and Desire," his 1953 war film that has never been on any home video format and is virtually unseen even in a museum context. A chance to see what Stanley was hiding under the mat. Though not his debut film, several early silent works by great German director Fritz Lang are also newly out on Kino.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
We love movies, those of us who do, because of how deeply they burrow into our psyches, of how they seem to be speaking to us and us alone in a very particular way. But, as the intriguing documentary "Room 237" illustrates, when it comes to some films, and some viewers, that conversation can be downright unnerving. As the film's title indicates, the film in question here is Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining," the director's version of the scary Stephen King novel starring Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall and a very large and very empty hotel whose Room 237 is definitely not the place to check into.
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