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Stanley Kwan

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1992
Hong Kong filmmaker Stanley Kwan, who is being honored with a retrospective of his films in the ongoing Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film and Video Festival, will make an appearance after the screening of his latest film, "Ruan Ling Yu," at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 16 at UCLA's Melnitz Theater. Information: (310) 206-FILM, 206-8013.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One evening in 1988, in a tasteful upscale bar in Beijing, a man playing pool takes notice of the arrival of a handsome younger man. The latter is an impoverished architectural student who is about to prostitute himself with the bar's owner. But the pool player, a decisive, aggressive businessman, claims the student for himself. It is the unexpected beginning of a tempestuous love affair, set against a time of rapid change and unrest in China, in the terse yet romantic "Lan Yu."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
The American Film Institute Los Angeles International Film Festival continues at the Cineplex Odeon Century Plaza Cinemas this weekend. Highlights from today's and Sunday's program follow. TODAY 'Rouge' Hong Kong, 1988, 99 minutes 8:40 p.m. Stanley Kwan's sophisticated ghost story begins with perfumed scenes of 1936 passion between a performer-courtesan and her wealthy lover. Then we're in the present as the courtesan's ghost wanders through cold, neon-lit streets in search of her lover--who has yet to show in the afterlife.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2002 | STEVE FRIESS
At first glance, this was not Stanley Kwan's sort of material. The novel passed his way by producer Zhang Yongning was smut, replete with constant and graphic sex set against a cheesy soap-opera plot. "I asked him, 'You want me to make a gay porno?' " the director recalled. "I was known for making small, intimate pictures about female characters. This didn't seem like a Stanley Kwan movie to me." Zhang was relentless.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2002 | STEVE FRIESS
At first glance, this was not Stanley Kwan's sort of material. The novel passed his way by producer Zhang Yongning was smut, replete with constant and graphic sex set against a cheesy soap-opera plot. "I asked him, 'You want me to make a gay porno?' " the director recalled. "I was known for making small, intimate pictures about female characters. This didn't seem like a Stanley Kwan movie to me." Zhang was relentless.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One evening in 1988, in a tasteful upscale bar in Beijing, a man playing pool takes notice of the arrival of a handsome younger man. The latter is an impoverished architectural student who is about to prostitute himself with the bar's owner. But the pool player, a decisive, aggressive businessman, claims the student for himself. It is the unexpected beginning of a tempestuous love affair, set against a time of rapid change and unrest in China, in the terse yet romantic "Lan Yu."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
'Love Unto Waste' Hong Kong, 1986, 96 minutes , noon Stanley Kwan's elegant, acerbic study of young people adrift in Hong Kong recalls Antonioni's "L'Avventura." Tony Leung plays a handsome rich kid involved with a pretty model and befriended by two glamorous, 30ish Taiwanese women who take the younger couple in tow. This is an unpredictable, reflective and altogether sophisticated, grown-up film. RECOMMENDED
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The UCLA Film and Television Archive and Visual Communications' 10th annual Asian Pacific Film and Video Festival, which begins Thursday and runs through June 4, will present more than 50 films at five venues. The festival opens at the Japan America Theater with Sokly Ny and Spencer Nakasako's "A.K.A. Don Bonus," about a Cambodian youth living in a San Francisco housing project.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanley Kwan's "Rouge" (Nuart) is an exquisite supernatural fable, an opium dream of a movie that re-creates glamorous Hong Kong of the '30s and then plays it against the city's teeming, workaday present to illuminate and contrast the changing relationships between men and women there.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Hong Kong movies, long known for their stylish violence, are being geared to the expanding Chinese market and stricter censorship standards there, and observers are worried that Hong Kong cinema is losing its edge. Hong Kong-Chinese co-productions are now the norm. Top directors favor ancient Chinese epics that appeal to a broader audience and are less likely to offend Chinese censors wary of bloodshed or flesh-baring.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1992
Hong Kong filmmaker Stanley Kwan, who is being honored with a retrospective of his films in the ongoing Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film and Video Festival, will make an appearance after the screening of his latest film, "Ruan Ling Yu," at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 16 at UCLA's Melnitz Theater. Information: (310) 206-FILM, 206-8013.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
The American Film Institute Los Angeles International Film Festival continues at the Cineplex Odeon Century Plaza Cinemas this weekend. Highlights from today's and Sunday's program follow. TODAY 'Rouge' Hong Kong, 1988, 99 minutes 8:40 p.m. Stanley Kwan's sophisticated ghost story begins with perfumed scenes of 1936 passion between a performer-courtesan and her wealthy lover. Then we're in the present as the courtesan's ghost wanders through cold, neon-lit streets in search of her lover--who has yet to show in the afterlife.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2002 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
It's been a great year for high-quality Hollywood movies and for foreign films. South Korean cinema is fresh and exciting right now but has yet to break out of noncommercial and festival venues. Its highly touted Oscar entry "Oasis," a tale of outcast lovers, may change all that. European cinema remains healthy, Iran continues to produce risky -- politically and artistically -- pictures, and minority voices are being heard in national cinemas the world over.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For one night anyway, the Bates Motel looked like Chinatown on New Year's. When "Psycho" director Gus Van Sant was ready to start shooting at the new Bates house set last July, his production team organized a lavish feng shui ceremony designed to ward off any Hitchcockian evil spirits that might be lurking on the Universal Studios back lot. A kung fu master and his disciples blessed the house by performing a costumed lion dance in front of a Chinese temple altar.
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