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Stanley M Rosenblatt

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BUSINESS
June 8, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his 36 years as a lawyer, Stanley M. Rosenblatt has earned a reputation in south Florida legal circles as a passionate and pugnacious litigator. Now, at age 60, he is involved in the trial of his life. Jury selection began Monday and is expected to last at least another week in a suit that Rosenblatt has filed against the tobacco industry on behalf of 60,000 U.S. flight attendants.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his 36 years as a lawyer, Stanley M. Rosenblatt has earned a reputation in south Florida legal circles as a passionate and pugnacious litigator. Now, at age 60, he is involved in the trial of his life. Jury selection began Monday and is expected to last at least another week in a suit that Rosenblatt has filed against the tobacco industry on behalf of 60,000 U.S. flight attendants.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Surgeon General Julius B. Richmond, testifying Wednesday in the lawsuit by flight attendants against the tobacco industry, said he believes airline crews were exposed to substantial concentrations of secondhand smoke, resulting in some cases of cancer and other diseases.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for the country's top cigarette makers told jurors Tuesday that flight attendants claiming illnesses from secondhand smoke were exposed to minimal concentrations in airline cabins and have not experienced more health problems than anyone else.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cigarette makers have fraudulently sustained "a nonexistent controversy" about the risks of secondhand smoke with fatal consequences for many Americans, a lawyer for U.S. flight attendants declared in opening arguments Monday in a landmark tobacco trial. Bans on smoking in airlines and other enclosed spaces would have been imposed much sooner "if not for the interference and untruths told by the tobacco industry," attorney Stanley M. Rosenblatt said.
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