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Stanley Miller

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Miller, the UC San Diego chemist who was the first to demonstrate that the organic molecules necessary for life could be generated in a laboratory flask simulating the primitive Earth's atmosphere, died Sunday from heart failure in a hospital in National City. He was 77. Miller had suffered a series of strokes since 1999 and had been living in a nursing home, according to his brother, Donald. "Stanley Miller was the father of origin-of-life chemistry," said marine chemist Jeffrey L.
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SCIENCE
March 26, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
A historic 1953 experiment in which a chemist created a "primordial soup" of organic molecules ? showing that the chemical building blocks of life could have originated on a hot, gassy Earth ? was even more remarkable than scientists back then realized. Half a century later, researchers have unearthed a trove of long-lost experiments conducted by U.S. chemist Stanley Miller in his classic work. Using modern technology to analyze one key experiment, they have discovered that Miller's attempts produced more organic compounds than even he realized.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2004 | Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
Two women who say they witnessed the beating of alleged car thief Stanley Miller report that none of the police involved called out a warning that Miller had a gun, contradicting the account five officers gave to justify striking and kicking the prone suspect during his arrest. Los Angeles Police Officer John J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Miller, the UC San Diego chemist who was the first to demonstrate that the organic molecules necessary for life could be generated in a laboratory flask simulating the primitive Earth's atmosphere, died Sunday from heart failure in a hospital in National City. He was 77. Miller had suffered a series of strokes since 1999 and had been living in a nursing home, according to his brother, Donald. "Stanley Miller was the father of origin-of-life chemistry," said marine chemist Jeffrey L.
OPINION
June 29, 2004
Re "Beating of Black Suspect Puts Bratton's Race Inroads to Test," June 28: I find it a monumental sign of our community characteristic that not one person involved in this incident wants to step up and take personal responsibility for his actions. Everybody is up in arms over the treatment Stanley Miller received at the hands of the Los Angeles Police Department, yet I have not heard one single person say that the whole thing could have been avoided if Miller had not allegedly broken the law. I have heard Miller complain about his injuries, but he has yet to apologize for allegedly stealing a car and running from the police, putting their lives and the lives of innocent civilians at risk.
OPINION
June 28, 2004
Re "Bratton IDs Officers in Beating," June 25: Along with thousands of other people across the Southland who have seen the Stanley Miller pursuit video, I have listened to the pundits and the condemnation of the LAPD. Though I admit that it doesn't look good on the surface, with nearly 20 years of law enforcement experience I tempered my initial reaction of surprise with the thought that I, along with everyone else who is just an observer, don't know the whole story. I'm certain that the subsequent investigations will get to the bottom of "What in the world were you thinking?"
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
Two scientists from UC San Diego say they have debunked the widely accepted idea that primitive life originated in a chemical soup in volcanic hot-water vents on the ocean floor. The researchers have examined the chemical reactions the theory would require and concluded that it just was not possible for life-giving molecules to have been synthesized in the hot temperatures and high pressure of the vent areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2004 | Patrick McGreevy and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
A man beaten during a televised arrest by a Los Angeles police officer was transferred late Monday night to a state prison and then sent to its medical facility for observation after complaining of dizziness. An attorney for Stanley Miller told reporters that his client, who is now at the California Institution for Men in Chino, was exhibiting "classic signs of brain damage." Also on Tuesday, LAPD Chief William J. Bratton said Miller had a pair of wire cutters on him when he was arrested.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2004 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Miller, whose beating by a Los Angeles police officer was televised worldwide, sparked protests and triggered a half-dozen investigations, pleaded guilty Wednesday to evading arrest and was sentenced to three years in prison. "We feel it is an appropriate resolution to the case," said Sandi Gibbons, a spokeswoman for Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley. "It was the result of a negotiated settlement. He could have received more than five years."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2004 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Miller, the suspected car thief whose beating by a Los Angeles police officer with a flashlight was caught on videotape and broadcast nationwide, was charged Friday with joyriding and evading arrest in the incident. The June 23 beating in Compton at the end of a half-hour car chase and short foot pursuit sparked community outrage and a Los Angeles Police Department investigation marred by conflicting stories among the eight officers involved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2004 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Miller, whose beating by a Los Angeles police officer was televised worldwide, sparked protests and triggered a half-dozen investigations, pleaded guilty Wednesday to evading arrest and was sentenced to three years in prison. "We feel it is an appropriate resolution to the case," said Sandi Gibbons, a spokeswoman for Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley. "It was the result of a negotiated settlement. He could have received more than five years."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2004 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Miller, the suspected car thief whose beating by a Los Angeles police officer with a flashlight was caught on videotape and broadcast nationwide, was charged Friday with joyriding and evading arrest in the incident. The June 23 beating in Compton at the end of a half-hour car chase and short foot pursuit sparked community outrage and a Los Angeles Police Department investigation marred by conflicting stories among the eight officers involved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2004 | Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
Two women who say they witnessed the beating of alleged car thief Stanley Miller report that none of the police involved called out a warning that Miller had a gun, contradicting the account five officers gave to justify striking and kicking the prone suspect during his arrest. Los Angeles Police Officer John J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2004 | Patrick McGreevy and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
A man beaten during a televised arrest by a Los Angeles police officer was transferred late Monday night to a state prison and then sent to its medical facility for observation after complaining of dizziness. An attorney for Stanley Miller told reporters that his client, who is now at the California Institution for Men in Chino, was exhibiting "classic signs of brain damage." Also on Tuesday, LAPD Chief William J. Bratton said Miller had a pair of wire cutters on him when he was arrested.
OPINION
June 29, 2004
Re "Beating of Black Suspect Puts Bratton's Race Inroads to Test," June 28: I find it a monumental sign of our community characteristic that not one person involved in this incident wants to step up and take personal responsibility for his actions. Everybody is up in arms over the treatment Stanley Miller received at the hands of the Los Angeles Police Department, yet I have not heard one single person say that the whole thing could have been avoided if Miller had not allegedly broken the law. I have heard Miller complain about his injuries, but he has yet to apologize for allegedly stealing a car and running from the police, putting their lives and the lives of innocent civilians at risk.
OPINION
June 28, 2004
Re "Bratton IDs Officers in Beating," June 25: Along with thousands of other people across the Southland who have seen the Stanley Miller pursuit video, I have listened to the pundits and the condemnation of the LAPD. Though I admit that it doesn't look good on the surface, with nearly 20 years of law enforcement experience I tempered my initial reaction of surprise with the thought that I, along with everyone else who is just an observer, don't know the whole story. I'm certain that the subsequent investigations will get to the bottom of "What in the world were you thinking?"
SCIENCE
March 26, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
A historic 1953 experiment in which a chemist created a "primordial soup" of organic molecules ? showing that the chemical building blocks of life could have originated on a hot, gassy Earth ? was even more remarkable than scientists back then realized. Half a century later, researchers have unearthed a trove of long-lost experiments conducted by U.S. chemist Stanley Miller in his classic work. Using modern technology to analyze one key experiment, they have discovered that Miller's attempts produced more organic compounds than even he realized.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
Two scientists from UC San Diego say they have debunked the widely accepted idea that primitive life originated in a chemical soup in volcanic hot-water vents on the ocean floor. The researchers have examined the chemical reactions the theory would require and concluded that it just was not possible for life-giving molecules to have been synthesized in the hot temperatures and high pressure of the vent areas.
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