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Stanley Mosk

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NEWS
January 26, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Mosk has trouble imagining retirement, even though he knows he is in the twilight of his career, one that began before most people in this state were born. "I want to end my career when I want it to end, not when some campaign promoter chooses to end it for me," said the dean of the California Supreme Court, not quite announcing that he will run for another 12-year term this November.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Justice Joyce L. Kennard, a Republican appointee who forged a largely liberal path on the California Supreme Court, announced Tuesday she will retire April 5, giving Gov. Jerry Brown another chance to put his mark on the state's highest court. Kennard, 72, is the court's longest-serving justice, with a 25-year tenure. She has been regarded as a highly independent judge, often siding with the underdog. Though she owed her place on the top court to former Gov. George Deukmejian, a law-and-order conservative, she bucked expectations and sided so often with the late liberal Justice Stanley Mosk that the pair was dubbed "the odd couple.
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NEWS
June 20, 2001 | JON THURBER and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Justice Stanley Mosk, the influential, widely acclaimed and contentiously independent senior member of the state Supreme Court, died Tuesday. He was 88. The longest-serving member in the court's 151-year history, Mosk died unexpectedly at his home in San Francisco, according to a statement released by the court. Mosk was in his office working Monday and experienced chest pains during the day, his grandson said. The only Democrat on the court, Mosk issued his last opinion June 14.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Charles A. O'Brien, 83, a former California deputy attorney general who narrowly lost the 1970 election for attorney general to Evelle Younger, died Sept. 3 at his home in Danville, Calif., after a period of declining health, his family said. O'Brien joined the attorney general's office in 1959 under Stanley Mosk, left in 1961 for a stint as Gov. Pat Brown's executive secretary, then a year later became manager of Mosk's reelection campaign. After Mosk won the 1962 race, he named O'Brien, a fellow Democrat, as his deputy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
County supervisors renamed the civil courthouse at 1st and Hill streets Tuesday for the late California Supreme Court Justice Stanley Mosk. Mosk died in June after serving a record 37 years on the high court. He had been a Los Angeles Superior Court judge for 16 years and was twice elected as California's attorney general.
OPINION
June 24, 2001
Re "Stanley Mosk, State's Senior Justice, Dies," June 20: In addition to the many achievements mentioned, Stanley Mosk was the author of "Democracy in America--Day by Day," a calendar of events and comments in diary form quoting the words of Thomas Jefferson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Franklin Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy, among many others. By offering "a teaspoon of knowledge each day," he suggests--again turning to his preface--that "this easy dosage may help us appreciate our heritage and encourage us to rededicate ourselves to those principles that distinguish our democracy and make it a beacon for freedom-loving people everywhere on this globe."
NEWS
January 26, 1986
With a yearly salary of $119,769, Stanley Mosk is the highest-paid elected official in California, the result of a since-repealed law that tied judges' pay increases to the cost of living. He makes $21,000 more than Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird. The governor is paid $49,100 this year and will make $85,000 next year. Mosk benefited from his longevity and a law that gave state judges salary increases pegged to the inflation rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1986
Stanley Mosk, a distinguished jurist, criticizes Pat Brown for being inconsistent because he opposes the appointment of Rehnquist as chief justice of the United States, yet advocates the retention of all judges for the California Supreme Court. There is nothing inconsistent about that position. All judges should be retained regardless of their philosophies as long as they are competent, judicious and honest. Their decisions should not be a litmus test for retention because that would tend to destroy the independence of the judiciary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001
Stanley Mosk became a judge the year after California officials had summarily shipped off tens of thousands of Japanese Americans to remote internment camps. It was 1943, a time of restrictive covenants that barred white homeowners in many neighborhoods from selling to blacks, Asians, Mexicans or Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1998
JANICE ROGERS BROWN * Position: Associate justice, California Supreme Court * Age: 49 * Education: UCLA School of Law, 1977. Bachelor's, Cal State Sacramento, economics, 1974. * Career highlights: Appointed to California Supreme Court by Gov. Pete Wilson, 1996. Deputy attorney general, state Department of Justice, 1979-87. Deputy secretary and general counsel, California Business, Transportation and Housing Agency, 1987-89.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
County supervisors renamed the civil courthouse at 1st and Hill streets Tuesday for the late California Supreme Court Justice Stanley Mosk. Mosk died in June after serving a record 37 years on the high court. He had been a Los Angeles Superior Court judge for 16 years and was twice elected as California's attorney general.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Four moderate Democratic judges, including two who were first appointed to the bench by Republicans, are Gov. Gray Davis' finalists to fill a vacancy on the California Supreme Court, the governor's office announced Wednesday. Davis submitted the names of the four men to a state bar committee that evaluates judicial candidates. They are: 5th District Court of Appeal Justice Dennis Cornell, who serves in Fresno; U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Justice Stanley Mosk, who died last week after serving 37 years on the California Supreme Court, was remembered Tuesday for what speaker after speaker called his "legacy of justice." A memorial service for Mosk at the Wilshire Boulevard Temple attracted hundreds, including a wide array of public officials. Among those attending were Gov. Gray Davis, state Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer, state Senate President Pro Tem John Burton, Los Angeles Mayor-elect James K.
OPINION
June 24, 2001
Re "Stanley Mosk, State's Senior Justice, Dies," June 20: In addition to the many achievements mentioned, Stanley Mosk was the author of "Democracy in America--Day by Day," a calendar of events and comments in diary form quoting the words of Thomas Jefferson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Franklin Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy, among many others. By offering "a teaspoon of knowledge each day," he suggests--again turning to his preface--that "this easy dosage may help us appreciate our heritage and encourage us to rededicate ourselves to those principles that distinguish our democracy and make it a beacon for freedom-loving people everywhere on this globe."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001
Stanley Mosk became a judge the year after California officials had summarily shipped off tens of thousands of Japanese Americans to remote internment camps. It was 1943, a time of restrictive covenants that barred white homeowners in many neighborhoods from selling to blacks, Asians, Mexicans or Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The death of California Supreme Court Justice Stanley Mosk leaves a gaping hole on the state high court that Gov. Gray Davis is expected to fill with a moderate, pro-death penalty Democrat. Mosk, one of the most prolific writers of court opinions, died at his home here Tuesday afternoon at the age of 88 of heart disease. He had worked Monday but did not go to the court Tuesday because of a bronchial condition. He died in his bedroom, where he had gone to rest, court sources said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Charles A. O'Brien, 83, a former California deputy attorney general who narrowly lost the 1970 election for attorney general to Evelle Younger, died Sept. 3 at his home in Danville, Calif., after a period of declining health, his family said. O'Brien joined the attorney general's office in 1959 under Stanley Mosk, left in 1961 for a stint as Gov. Pat Brown's executive secretary, then a year later became manager of Mosk's reelection campaign. After Mosk won the 1962 race, he named O'Brien, a fellow Democrat, as his deputy.
NEWS
June 20, 2001 | JON THURBER and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Justice Stanley Mosk, the influential, widely acclaimed and contentiously independent senior member of the state Supreme Court, died Tuesday. He was 88. The longest-serving member in the court's 151-year history, Mosk died unexpectedly at his home in San Francisco, according to a statement released by the court. Mosk was in his office working Monday and experienced chest pains during the day, his grandson said. The only Democrat on the court, Mosk issued his last opinion June 14.
NEWS
December 26, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
California Supreme Court Justice Stanley Mosk, who breaks a record today to become the longest-sitting judge on the state high court, says he remains fit at 87 and will serve at least a "couple" of more years. Mosk, the only Democrat on the Supreme Court, has been an associate justice for more than 35 years. A former California attorney general, Mosk was appointed to the high court by the late Gov. Pat Brown. Six governors have been in office while Mosk has served on the court.
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