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Stanley S Arkin

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BUSINESS
May 22, 1990 | RICK GLADSTONE, Associated Press
Stanley S. Arkin, one of the nation's best-known trial attorneys and a leading defense lawyer in Wall Street fraud cases, has decided to hang his shingle on someone else's door. The 52-year-old courtroom veteran, who began his career defending accused murderers and drug dealers and later expanded to more complex cases ranging from celebrity divorces to stock manipulation, said he's joining Chadbourne & Park, a 250-lawyer firm based in New York, on July 1.
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BUSINESS
May 22, 1990 | RICK GLADSTONE, Associated Press
Stanley S. Arkin, one of the nation's best-known trial attorneys and a leading defense lawyer in Wall Street fraud cases, has decided to hang his shingle on someone else's door. The 52-year-old courtroom veteran, who began his career defending accused murderers and drug dealers and later expanded to more complex cases ranging from celebrity divorces to stock manipulation, said he's joining Chadbourne & Park, a 250-lawyer firm based in New York, on July 1.
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BUSINESS
January 24, 2006 | From Associated Press
A Los Angeles federal judge Monday rejected a plea agreement that would have allowed former Gemstar-TV Guide International Inc. Chief Executive Henry Yuen to escape prison time in exchange for pleading guilty to destroying evidence in a Securities and Exchange Commission probe. U.S. District Judge John Walter said the agreed-upon sentence of six months of home detention, a $250,000 fine and a $1-million charitable donation "failed to reflect the seriousness of the offense."
BUSINESS
December 3, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first action against Salomon Bros. executives since a scandal that rocked Wall Street last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday filed civil fraud charges against two former government bond traders it accused of submitting false bids in U.S. Treasury securities auctions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1995 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two former employees of tobacco heiress Doris Duke charged Friday that she was incompetent when she signed amendments to her will in a Los Angeles hospital bed in the spring of 1993, making her butler her chief executor.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In the latest development in Wall Street's insider trading scandal, a federal grand jury on Thursday indicted three top securities traders on multiple felony counts of fraud and conspiracy. The indictment, which was expected, broadens what is known about the federal investigation by asserting for the first time that Goldman, Sachs & Co., which employed one of the defendants, itself profited from the alleged trading scheme.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2005 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Gemstar-TV Guide International Inc. is deriding as "a slap on the wrist" the proposed sentence of its former chief executive, Henry C. Yuen, who pleaded guilty in a multimillion-dollar accounting fraud. In court papers, the Los Angeles company argues that the six months of home detention recommended in Yuen's plea agreement with the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles is insufficient punishment.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In an apparent setback to the government in a key insider trading case, a federal judge Tuesday rejected a prosecution motion to delay the trial of three Wall Street stock traders for two months. As a result, the trial against Robert M. Freeman, Richard B. Wigton and Timothy L. Tabor is scheduled to begin May 20. U.S. Atty. Rudolph W.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Liggett, the smallest of the nation's major cigarette companies, is negotiating an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice that would grant the firm immunity in return for its help in the government's continuing criminal investigation of the industry, according to sources close to the talks. Bennett S.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2005 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
In a rare split, the Securities and Exchange Commission is at odds with its partner in cleaning up corporate accounting -- the Justice Department -- over a plea agreement with the former chief of Gemstar-TV Guide International Inc. The SEC's criticism of Henry Yuen's sentence as too lenient played a role in U.S. District Judge John Walters' decision last week to tentatively reject a deal between Yuen and the Justice Department.
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