Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStanley Sheinbaum
IN THE NEWS

Stanley Sheinbaum

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
September 27, 1987
If Sheinbaum's influence is diminishing, why then is his endorsement still the plum for which many candidates vie, and his opinion of both issues and candidates regularly sought by a significant number of individuals and groups? Venette Hill Hermosa Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 14, 1997
Can I be the only reader who was horrified at the gross breach of medical ethics casually recounted in Irene Lacher's description of a recent party at Arianna Huffington's ("Huffington's Grand Old Party," Sept. 28). The article quotes Stanley Sheinbaum telling how his physician took him in to see fellow patient Ronald Reagan, who was waiting naked in another examining room. The same physician had earlier told Sheinbaum about the ex-president's Alzheimer's disease before the diagnosis was publicly announced.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
June 28, 1987 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein is the West Coast correspondent for the National Journal.
IN THE VIP LOUNGE ABOVE the auction room at Sotheby's in New York one drizzly evening this May, Stanley K. Sheinbaum is pacing like an expectant father. He walks up to the window that overlooks the hall. He walks away. He picks at the hors d'oeuvres arrayed on a table. He chats for a moment with his wife, Betty. He shuffles over to the bar. He drifts back to the window. He looks uncomfortable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1993 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that well-laid plans for keeping peace in the city could have been upset, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and his top aide excoriated Police Commissioner Stanley K. Sheinbaum for his public speculations on the eve of announcement of verdicts in the Rodney G. King civil rights case.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Sheinbaum was finally feeling better. He had been in his sickbed in the Regency Hotel for a week. But the news had just flashed on television that President Reagan was ordering the State Department to open a formal dialogue with the Palestine Liberation Organization. Sounding breathless, Sheinbaum pronounced himself greatly relieved. The day before, with much different emotions, he had watched PLO chairman Yasser Arafat's televised speech at the special session of the U.N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Councilman Hal Bernson, a leading opponent of a ballot proposition that would increase property taxes to hire 1,000 more police officers, on Thursday wrote a tongue-in-cheek letter of rebuke to Police Commission President Stanley Sheinbaum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1991
Mayor Bradley put the fox in the henhouse when he appointed American Civil Liberties Union activist Stanley Sheinbaum to the city's Police Commission. EDITH MILLIGAN Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
July 26, 1987
It is very interesting--men like Stanley Sheinbaum and Tom Hayden, who have rich wives, are political liberals. They don't have to worry that high taxes mean less leftover money. They don't have to pay the rent or worry about food bills. Maybe they should live in the real world. Jeanne Blandi Huntington Beach
NEWS
October 14, 1997
Can I be the only reader who was horrified at the gross breach of medical ethics casually recounted in Irene Lacher's description of a recent party at Arianna Huffington's ("Huffington's Grand Old Party," Sept. 28). The article quotes Stanley Sheinbaum telling how his physician took him in to see fellow patient Ronald Reagan, who was waiting naked in another examining room. The same physician had earlier told Sheinbaum about the ex-president's Alzheimer's disease before the diagnosis was publicly announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Councilman Hal Bernson, a leading opponent of a ballot proposition that would increase property taxes to hire 1,000 more police officers, on Thursday wrote a tongue-in-cheek letter of rebuke to Police Commission President Stanley Sheinbaum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992
Police Commissioners Stanley K. Sheinbaum and Jesse A. Brewer, two of outgoing Police Chief Daryl F. Gates' harshest critics, departed from the usual verbal warfare Tuesday at the last commission meeting before Gates retires and commended him for his years of service and department loyalty. Brewer, a retired assistant police chief, cited Gates' innovations and creativity.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Igniting a full-scale war of words that has been building for months, an unrestrained Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates on Monday said he was only bluffing when he threatened to prolong his stay on the job--even though he believes a bunch of "crummy little politicians" are endangering the department.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | Stanley K. Sheinbaum is president of the Los Angeles Police Commission
I was at home when I heard the verdict. I immediately left for police headquarters at Parker Center. About 6:15, as I got there, I heard on the radio that a demonstration had started there. Foolishly, I drove in front of Parker Center and had trouble getting through. People got in front of the car and I was sort of surprised because it was more white than black. But there were also some Progressive Labor Party and Revolutionary Communist Party signs there, which was not surprising.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1992 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six days after a formal request from the mayor, the president of the Los Angeles Police Commission told Chief Daryl F. Gates to stop making command-level reassignments--a sequence of events that led Gates on Monday to charge improper political meddling. The wording of the commission president's April 8 memo to Gates is strikingly similar--almost word for word in some areas--to Mayor Tom Bradley's April 2 letter to the panel. Nevertheless, Police Commission President Stanley K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
As Stanley Sheinbaum spoke at the press conference introducing Los Angeles' new police chief Thursday, he again found himself a major player at a decisive moment of history. Sheinbaum is president of the Police Commission, the panel that picked Willie L. Williams, L.A's first chief from out of town in 40 years and the first person of color to head the department. "The city is about to turn a corner," said Sheinbaum, a big, slightly stooped man of 71.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | RICH CONNELL and STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a historic step designed to propel the Los Angeles Police Department on a course of sweeping reforms, the city Police Commission has selected Philadelphia Police Commissioner Willie L. Williams to succeed embattled Chief Daryl F. Gates as the department's top official.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|