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Stanley Tate

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BUSINESS
July 14, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton will nominate a 65-year-old Florida real estate executive to be chief executive of the Resolution Trust Corp., the agency charged with cleaning up the savings and loan mess. Stanley Tate, a Republican, "should have strong bipartisan support in the Senate," which must confirm the nomination, said Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen. Tate heads Tate Enterprise, which develops, constructs and invests in condominiums, shopping centers and office buildings.
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BUSINESS
December 1, 1993 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanley Tate, chosen by President Clinton to manage the savings and loan cleanup, bitterly withdrew his nomination Tuesday, calling Washington a "vicious city" in which he had been subjected to anonymous death threats and had encountered entrenched opposition from bureaucrats opposed to any reform. Tate, a Florida real estate developer and banker, also blamed Sen. Donald W. Riegle Jr. (D-Mich.
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BUSINESS
December 1, 1993 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanley Tate, chosen by President Clinton to manage the savings and loan cleanup, bitterly withdrew his nomination Tuesday, calling Washington a "vicious city" in which he had been subjected to anonymous death threats and had encountered entrenched opposition from bureaucrats opposed to any reform. Tate, a Florida real estate developer and banker, also blamed Sen. Donald W. Riegle Jr. (D-Mich.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1993 | Associated Press
While awaiting Senate confirmation, President Clinton's nominee to oversee the government's savings and loan cleanup requested confidential investigative documents involving a Florida thrift executive he has known for years. The ethics rules for the Resolution Trust Corp., the S&L cleanup agency, mandate that all agency employees avoid even the "appearance of conflicts of interest" by recusing themselves from cases involving individuals they know. In an Aug.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1993 | Associated Press
While awaiting Senate confirmation, President Clinton's nominee to oversee the government's savings and loan cleanup requested confidential investigative documents involving a Florida thrift executive he has known for years. The ethics rules for the Resolution Trust Corp., the S&L cleanup agency, mandate that all agency employees avoid even the "appearance of conflicts of interest" by recusing themselves from cases involving individuals they know. In an Aug.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
RTC Nominee Says He May Decline Post: Florida realtor Stanley Tate, President Clinton's choice to head the Resolution Trust Corp., said he will decide next week whether to withdraw his name. Bloomberg Business News quoted him as saying in a telephone interview from his Miami office that he has been unable to arrange a meeting with Sen. Donald W. Riegle Jr. (D-Mich.), chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, which must consider the nomination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1993 | PETER DREIER, Peter Dreier, a professor of public policy at Occidental College and a former director of housing for the Boston Redevelopment Authority, is a Clinton appointee to the RTC Advisory Board
The proposed sale of the huge HomeFed Bank to another giant bank is an example of the Resolution Trust Corp.'s misguided "garage sale" mentality. The sale to Great Western Bank should be stopped until the RTC evaluates the impact on Southern California's economy, jobs and inner-city neighborhoods. Moreover, the withdrawal Tuesday of Stanley Tate's nomination to head the RTC gives President Clinton an opportunity to rethink the mission, operation and leadership of this troubled agency.
NEWS
December 1, 1993 | CHRIS KRAUL and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Great Western Bank, moving to become a financial powerhouse throughout California, has won a sealed-bid auction for the right to buy 119 branches with more than $4 billion in deposits from the failed HomeFed Bank in San Diego, banking industry sources said Tuesday. Great Western would add a potent San Diego presence to its already powerful network in the Los Angeles metropolitan region and its outlets in the central valley and the San Francisco Bay area.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1993 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government employees accused their bosses in the Western office of the Resolution Trust Corp. of lying to Congress, abusing their positions and wasting as much as $500 million in taxpayer funds trying to clean up failed California thrifts.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few worries gnaw on a parent like the prospect of putting a child through college. Tuition is rising faster than the nation's inflation rate, and the yearly cost of a higher education now drains 25% of the median family income. With financial aid limited, more and more college students are graduating not just with degrees but with mammoth loans needed to cover their Mt. Everest-sized bills. In the state Capitol this spring, there is a movement afoot to lend families a hand.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton will nominate a 65-year-old Florida real estate executive to be chief executive of the Resolution Trust Corp., the agency charged with cleaning up the savings and loan mess. Stanley Tate, a Republican, "should have strong bipartisan support in the Senate," which must confirm the nomination, said Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen. Tate heads Tate Enterprise, which develops, constructs and invests in condominiums, shopping centers and office buildings.
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