Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStanley Weiser
IN THE NEWS

Stanley Weiser

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2008
"Wall STREET" co-writer Stanley Weiser shouldn't have been too surprised that some people idolized Gordon Gekko. ("Repeat After Me: Greed Is Not Good" by Stanley Weiser, Oct. 5). Some viewers will always idolize the powerful and colorful guy, even if he's also the bad guy. And neither should Weiser be surprised that not everyone disbelieves Gekko's credo that "Greed is good." Greed is inevitable and a powerful motivator.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
"W. " MAY sound like the story of the initial that rocked the world, but it turns out to be the tale of a mouse that roared. Director Oliver Stone and writer Stanley Weiser's unexpected take on the life and times of our 43rd president will surprise a lot of people, especially those not used to seeing the words "Oliver Stone" and "carefully modulated" in the same sentence. Yes, "W. " is definitely satiric in intent and execution, and it has no love for the actions and policies of the man who has led, as the film's advertising puts it, "a life misunderestimated.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY
The Hollywood types flew into Meridian, Miss., to soak up local color for their movie. Naturally, they had to meet Lawrence Rainey, the old-time sheriff. He always seemed to be in the action around Neshoba County.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2008
"Wall STREET" co-writer Stanley Weiser shouldn't have been too surprised that some people idolized Gordon Gekko. ("Repeat After Me: Greed Is Not Good" by Stanley Weiser, Oct. 5). Some viewers will always idolize the powerful and colorful guy, even if he's also the bad guy. And neither should Weiser be surprised that not everyone disbelieves Gekko's credo that "Greed is good." Greed is inevitable and a powerful motivator.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
"W. " MAY sound like the story of the initial that rocked the world, but it turns out to be the tale of a mouse that roared. Director Oliver Stone and writer Stanley Weiser's unexpected take on the life and times of our 43rd president will surprise a lot of people, especially those not used to seeing the words "Oliver Stone" and "carefully modulated" in the same sentence. Yes, "W. " is definitely satiric in intent and execution, and it has no love for the actions and policies of the man who has led, as the film's advertising puts it, "a life misunderestimated.
SPORTS
November 25, 2000
Bravo to Robyn Norwood on her Tim Brown/Raider piece [Nov. 13]. From this greatly undervalued pass receiver, she sheds light on how Al Davis finally ceded control to the dynamic young coach, Jon Gruden, and how he transformed a rudderless collection of talent into a team playing on the same page. Maybe if T.J. Simers tagged along with Ms. Norwood, he could learn a thing or two about good, objective sportswriting. STANLEY WEISER Santa Monica
SPORTS
June 5, 1999
No pro sports team has won a world championship here in 11 years. Yet in the sun-drenched town of softies, laid-back fans and overpaid prima-donna athletes, it's all but overlooked that four current world boxing champions lace it up here: Oscar De La Hoya, Shane Mosley, Fernando Vargas and Frankie Liles. As Bill Plaschke rightfully says, "L.A. has become a city of sports losers." But don't tell that to fans of the sweet science. STANLEY WEISER Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Platoon" director Oliver Stone says he's confronting "enormous paranoia" from many New York brokerage firms as he seeks locations for "Wall St.," which he starts filming next month. "There's sensitivity in the air because of what's going on in the news," Stone told The Times. "They're scared of the film." Stone, who co-wrote the screenplay with Stanley Weiser "even before the (Ivan) Boesky thing hit," tried to stay away from the ongoing insider-trading scandal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986 | John M. Wilson
20th Century Fox executives may not want you to know it, but the mysterious title of their big Christmas entry, "Project X," was once what it sounds like--a working title. We called about the vagueness of the title, mentioning marketing problems that beset Orion's "F/X" (now called "Murder by Illusion" for European release). But Fox brass had a only a curt reply: "We respectfully decline comment on the matter."
MAGAZINE
February 5, 1989
As the screenwriter of "Project X," I want to thank you for your in-depth article exploring the trainers' side of the cruelty controversy ("Animals in Hollywood--Actors or Victims?" by Vicki Hearne, Dec. 11). I know Hubert Wells and Mark Hardin, and I find them to be decent, compassionate and intelligent men. I was on the set for a good part of the movie, and I never witnessed them or the other trainers abusing any of the chimpanzees. It's a cruel irony to make an animal rights film and have it condemned for the very issues that it speaks out against.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY
The Hollywood types flew into Meridian, Miss., to soak up local color for their movie. Naturally, they had to meet Lawrence Rainey, the old-time sheriff. He always seemed to be in the action around Neshoba County.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1988 | Pat H. Broeske
"Mississippi Burning"--generating critical kudos and awards (like the National Board of Review's best pic of '88)--also is catching a lot of flak. Black leaders like Coretta Scott King and journalists who covered the 1960s civil-rights movement are knocking Alan Parker's movie for telling the civil rights struggle from a white point of view and for relegating blacks to background and "victim" roles. Now, producers of "Mississippi Summer" say their movie will rectify Parker's account.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|