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June 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
Canadian weightlifter Bob Karsch has been suspended from competition for two years after testing positive for use of steroids, the Canadian Weightlifting Federation confirmed Wednesday night. Federation President Yvon Chouinard said a urine sample provided by Karsch at the national championships in Sarnia, Ontario, two weeks ago revealed traces of the anabolic steroid stanozolol, the same muscle-building drug used by sprinter Ben Johnson, who was banned for two years after testing positive at the Seoul Olympics.
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SPORTS
June 22, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Robert Kerr said Wednesday that he has evidence further linking Ben Johnson's doctor to the anabolic steroid that resulted in the Canadian sprinter's positive drug test in the 1988 Summer Olympics. But the San Gabriel sports-medicine specialist said he was not allowed to present the evidence when he testified Monday before the Canadian government's commission of inquiry into drug use by athletes. Dr. Jamie Astaphan had testified earlier that he supervised Johnson's drug program for four years, administering a final injection of a steroid to the sprinter only 27 days before Johnson ran in the 100-meter final at Seoul.
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SPORTS
May 11, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
After saying two weeks ago that there was no substance to sabotage theories surrounding Ben Johnson's positive drug test in the 1988 Summer Olympics, the co-counsel for the Canadian government's commission of inquiry into drug use by athletes reinforced his position Wednesday with scientific evidence. Robert P. Armstrong established through testimony from a chemist that the drug allegedly given to several Canadian track and field athletes by Dr. Jamie Astaphan contained stanozolol, the anabolic steroid found in Johnson's system at Seoul.
SPORTS
June 16, 1989
Bob Karsch, a Canadian weightlifter, was suspended from competition for two years after testing positive for the steroid stanozolol.
SPORTS
June 16, 1989
Bob Karsch, a Canadian weightlifter, was suspended from competition for two years after testing positive for the steroid stanozolol.
SPORTS
May 29, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
If Dr. Jamie Astaphan is so smart, as he obviously would like for us to believe, why did his prize patient, Ben Johnson, test positive for the anabolic steroid stanozolol at the Seoul Olympics? That is the only mystery remaining as the track and field phase of the Canadian government's inquiry into drug use by athletes enters its 14th week today with Astaphan returning to the witness stand. As Astaphan has given no definitive answer to the question, and as Johnson is not likely to when he appears before the commission of inquiry two weeks from today, we may never be completely sure.
SPORTS
May 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sprinter Ben Johnson's doctor purchased large quantities of steroids intended for cats, dogs and horses beginning in 1985, a Canadian federal inquiry into drug use in amateur sports was told today. Joseph Kiefer, director of corporate relations with Sterling Drug Ltd., the only maker of stanozolol products in North America, testified that Dr. Jamie Astaphan began purchasing tablets of the muscle-building drug in June, 1985. Astaphan turned to an injectable form in December, 1985, Kiefer told the inquiry.
SPORTS
June 12, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY
Significant dates leading to Ben Johnson's first day of testimony today in the Canadian government's inquiry into drug use by athletes: Sept. 24, 1988--Johnson runs the 100 meter final in 9.79 seconds at the Seoul Olympics to break his world record and win the gold medal. Sept. 27--The International Olympic Committee announces that Johnson tested positive for an anabolic steroid, stanozolol, after the 100-meter final and strips him of his gold medal, also voiding his new world record.
SPORTS
June 22, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Robert Kerr said Wednesday that he has evidence further linking Ben Johnson's doctor to the anabolic steroid that resulted in the Canadian sprinter's positive drug test in the 1988 Summer Olympics. But the San Gabriel sports-medicine specialist said he was not allowed to present the evidence when he testified Monday before the Canadian government's commission of inquiry into drug use by athletes. Dr. Jamie Astaphan had testified earlier that he supervised Johnson's drug program for four years, administering a final injection of a steroid to the sprinter only 27 days before Johnson ran in the 100-meter final at Seoul.
SPORTS
October 7, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A spokesman for a U.S.-owned drug company here said that Ben Johnson's personal physician purchased the same anabolic steroid that was found in the Canadian sprinter's urine after he won the 100-meter dash in the Olympic Games last month. The physician, Dr. George Mario (Jamie) Astaphan, has told some media organizations that he has never given stanozolol to any of his patients. He said that includes Johnson, who was stripped of his gold medal after he tested positive for the drug at Seoul.
SPORTS
June 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
Canadian weightlifter Bob Karsch has been suspended from competition for two years after testing positive for use of steroids, the Canadian Weightlifting Federation confirmed Wednesday night. Federation President Yvon Chouinard said a urine sample provided by Karsch at the national championships in Sarnia, Ontario, two weeks ago revealed traces of the anabolic steroid stanozolol, the same muscle-building drug used by sprinter Ben Johnson, who was banned for two years after testing positive at the Seoul Olympics.
SPORTS
June 12, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY
Significant dates leading to Ben Johnson's first day of testimony today in the Canadian government's inquiry into drug use by athletes: Sept. 24, 1988--Johnson runs the 100 meter final in 9.79 seconds at the Seoul Olympics to break his world record and win the gold medal. Sept. 27--The International Olympic Committee announces that Johnson tested positive for an anabolic steroid, stanozolol, after the 100-meter final and strips him of his gold medal, also voiding his new world record.
SPORTS
May 29, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
If Dr. Jamie Astaphan is so smart, as he obviously would like for us to believe, why did his prize patient, Ben Johnson, test positive for the anabolic steroid stanozolol at the Seoul Olympics? That is the only mystery remaining as the track and field phase of the Canadian government's inquiry into drug use by athletes enters its 14th week today with Astaphan returning to the witness stand. As Astaphan has given no definitive answer to the question, and as Johnson is not likely to when he appears before the commission of inquiry two weeks from today, we may never be completely sure.
SPORTS
May 11, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
After saying two weeks ago that there was no substance to sabotage theories surrounding Ben Johnson's positive drug test in the 1988 Summer Olympics, the co-counsel for the Canadian government's commission of inquiry into drug use by athletes reinforced his position Wednesday with scientific evidence. Robert P. Armstrong established through testimony from a chemist that the drug allegedly given to several Canadian track and field athletes by Dr. Jamie Astaphan contained stanozolol, the anabolic steroid found in Johnson's system at Seoul.
SPORTS
May 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sprinter Ben Johnson's doctor purchased large quantities of steroids intended for cats, dogs and horses beginning in 1985, a Canadian federal inquiry into drug use in amateur sports was told today. Joseph Kiefer, director of corporate relations with Sterling Drug Ltd., the only maker of stanozolol products in North America, testified that Dr. Jamie Astaphan began purchasing tablets of the muscle-building drug in June, 1985. Astaphan turned to an injectable form in December, 1985, Kiefer told the inquiry.
SPORTS
October 7, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A spokesman for a U.S.-owned drug company here said that Ben Johnson's personal physician purchased the same anabolic steroid that was found in the Canadian sprinter's urine after he won the 100-meter dash in the Olympic Games last month. The physician, Dr. George Mario (Jamie) Astaphan, has told some media organizations that he has never given stanozolol to any of his patients. He said that includes Johnson, who was stripped of his gold medal after he tested positive for the drug at Seoul.
SPORTS
August 4, 2009 | David Wharton
Twenty-five years later, it is hard to recall a time before the rumors and accusations. A time before athletes competed without suspicion hovering around each record-setting performance. A time before sprinters and swimmers had to share the sports page with the likes of nandrolone and stanozolol. The 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, it seems, were the last innocent Summer Games before the dawn of the steroid era.
SPORTS
June 20, 1991
Athletics Canada, the governing body of Canadian track and field, suspended sprinters Brian Morrison of Canada and William Hinchcliff of New Zealand for two years after they had tested positive for the banned substance stanozolol.
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