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Stansfield Turner

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NEWS
October 7, 1986
Retired Adm. Stansfield Turner and his adopted daughter sued each other over ownership of a house in Walnut Creek. Turner, who headed the Central Intelligence Agency in the Carter Administration, said Laurel Turner Armbrister, 41, and her husband sold their home to him for $145,000. But the Armbristers said Turner had promised to will the house to them at his death--a promise on which he reneged when he was divorced from Mrs. Armbrister's mother.
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NEWS
January 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Former CIA Director Adm. Stansfield Turner was among at least 15 people injured in a weekend airplane crash that killed his wife, a U.S. couple and a Spaniard, Costa Rican authorities said Sunday. Turner, 76, who headed the CIA from 1977 to 1981 under President Carter, was in critical condition in the emergency surgery unit of a San Jose hospital, a spokeswoman at the facility said Sunday night.
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NEWS
January 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Former CIA Director Adm. Stansfield Turner was among at least 15 people injured in a weekend airplane crash that killed his wife, a U.S. couple and a Spaniard, Costa Rican authorities said Sunday. Turner, 76, who headed the CIA from 1977 to 1981 under President Carter, was in critical condition in the emergency surgery unit of a San Jose hospital, a spokeswoman at the facility said Sunday night.
NEWS
December 3, 1994 | From the Washington Post
Former CIA Director Stansfield Turner stunned a conference of dozens of current and former agency analysts Friday with a blunt critique of the CIA's effectiveness--and his own--during his term in office. Although not listed on the program, Turner stole the spotlight when he told the audience the agency had shortchanged President Jimmy Carter in the late 1970s.
NEWS
December 3, 1994 | From the Washington Post
Former CIA Director Stansfield Turner stunned a conference of dozens of current and former agency analysts Friday with a blunt critique of the CIA's effectiveness--and his own--during his term in office. Although not listed on the program, Turner stole the spotlight when he told the audience the agency had shortchanged President Jimmy Carter in the late 1970s.
NEWS
October 3, 1988 | United Press International
Former CIA Director Stansfield Turner, in an interview published Sunday, backed off his assertion that Vice President George Bush was responsible for putting Panama's leader, Manuel A. Noriega, back on the CIA payroll. In an interview with the New York Times, Turner contradicted previous statments made to United Press International, saying he knew of no involvement by Bush in the CIA decision to rehire Noriega.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | United Press International
Former CIA Director Stansfield Turner said Friday that he removed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega from the agency payroll in 1977 because he was an "unscrupulous character," but that Vice President George Bush later reinstated him. Turner said that after Bush took office in 1981 he "met with Noriega and put him back on the payroll" as an intelligence source. Bush spokesman Stephen Hart said Turner's statement was "patently false--untrue."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1987
The congressional Iran- contra hearings are in recess for the weekend. Time to analyze what was said this week in testimony by Lt. Col. Oliver North. Sen. Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) and Sen. Warren Rudman (R-N.H.), who head the Senate committee investigating the affair, will provide their assessment on CBS' "Face the Nation" Sunday (9:30 a.m., Channels 2 and 8). "This Week With David Brinkley" will take a slightly broader view. Its guests will be Sen. George Mitchell (D-Maine), Sen.
NEWS
March 10, 1987 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
CIA officials, chafing because of suggestions that covert activities have lurched out of control during the Reagan Administration, say more than half of all the secret operations now under way actually began under President Jimmy Carter.
OPINION
October 5, 1986 | James Bamford, James Bamford, author of "The Puzzle Palace," an examination of the National Security Agency, writes frequently about intelligence issues. and As seen in the Iranian hostage rescue mission and the Grenada invasion, this caldron of clandestine and special warfare units can prove disastrous
Its indigo-black titanium skin begins to glow crimson as the SR-71 "Blackbird" slips through the thin air quicker than a 30.06 bullet escaping its barrel. Twenty minutes after it takes off from Beal Air Force Base near Sacramento, a faint sonic boom can be heard in San Diego as the spy plane, out over the Pacific, speeds south and then east to a secret war in Central America. That distant boom is a subtle reminder of America's long and opaque war against the Sandinista government of Nicaragua.
NEWS
October 3, 1988 | United Press International
Former CIA Director Stansfield Turner, in an interview published Sunday, backed off his assertion that Vice President George Bush was responsible for putting Panama's leader, Manuel A. Noriega, back on the CIA payroll. In an interview with the New York Times, Turner contradicted previous statments made to United Press International, saying he knew of no involvement by Bush in the CIA decision to rehire Noriega.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | United Press International
Former CIA Director Stansfield Turner said Friday that he removed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega from the agency payroll in 1977 because he was an "unscrupulous character," but that Vice President George Bush later reinstated him. Turner said that after Bush took office in 1981 he "met with Noriega and put him back on the payroll" as an intelligence source. Bush spokesman Stephen Hart said Turner's statement was "patently false--untrue."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1987
The congressional Iran- contra hearings are in recess for the weekend. Time to analyze what was said this week in testimony by Lt. Col. Oliver North. Sen. Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) and Sen. Warren Rudman (R-N.H.), who head the Senate committee investigating the affair, will provide their assessment on CBS' "Face the Nation" Sunday (9:30 a.m., Channels 2 and 8). "This Week With David Brinkley" will take a slightly broader view. Its guests will be Sen. George Mitchell (D-Maine), Sen.
NEWS
March 10, 1987 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
CIA officials, chafing because of suggestions that covert activities have lurched out of control during the Reagan Administration, say more than half of all the secret operations now under way actually began under President Jimmy Carter.
NEWS
October 7, 1986
Retired Adm. Stansfield Turner and his adopted daughter sued each other over ownership of a house in Walnut Creek. Turner, who headed the Central Intelligence Agency in the Carter Administration, said Laurel Turner Armbrister, 41, and her husband sold their home to him for $145,000. But the Armbristers said Turner had promised to will the house to them at his death--a promise on which he reneged when he was divorced from Mrs. Armbrister's mother.
OPINION
October 5, 1986 | James Bamford, James Bamford, author of "The Puzzle Palace," an examination of the National Security Agency, writes frequently about intelligence issues. and As seen in the Iranian hostage rescue mission and the Grenada invasion, this caldron of clandestine and special warfare units can prove disastrous
Its indigo-black titanium skin begins to glow crimson as the SR-71 "Blackbird" slips through the thin air quicker than a 30.06 bullet escaping its barrel. Twenty minutes after it takes off from Beal Air Force Base near Sacramento, a faint sonic boom can be heard in San Diego as the spy plane, out over the Pacific, speeds south and then east to a secret war in Central America. That distant boom is a subtle reminder of America's long and opaque war against the Sandinista government of Nicaragua.
NATIONAL
June 13, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
A group of 26 former senior diplomats and military officials, several appointed to key positions by Republican Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, plans to issue a joint statement this week arguing that President George W. Bush has damaged America's national security and should be defeated in November. The group, which calls itself Diplomats and Military Commanders for Change, will explicitly condemn Bush's foreign policy, according to several of those who signed the document.
NEWS
January 13, 1986
Former CIA Director Stansfield Turner recommended that the intelligence organizations in the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps be disbanded and their activities centered in the Defense Intelligence Agency. Turner said the DIA was created in 1964 by Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara to provide intelligence to the Joint Chiefs of Staff that was free of bias from the various services.
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