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Stanton Ca Taxes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
After clashing with angry residents, the City Council this week tentatively approved a 6% tax on utilities that officials hope will help offset a projected $1.4-million deficit in the 1993-94 budget. Residents will be able to protest the utility tax proposal again on March 23, when the council is expected to take a final vote. If approved, the tax would appear on water, gas, electricity and phone bills beginning this summer.
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NEWS
June 5, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The cities lie at either end of the local landscape, but if the failed utility tax elections in San Clemente and Stanton are any indication, it may be a long time before voters choose to tax themselves in Orange County. The resounding defeats came despite dire warnings from local officials that public safety and park services would suffer in the wake of Proposition 218, which requires that any new taxes and those imposed since January 1995 be approved by a voter majority.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997 | RUSS LOAR
Apartment building owners and associations have contributed more than $24,000 to defeat the city's public-safety services fee that will come before voters next month. Councilman David John Shawver tried Tuesday night to convince members of the Apartment Assn. of Orange County that they have made a mistake. "It's hard for me to sit back and see money that's coming from the outside, not even from within my community, that's going to take away my police and fire services," Shawver said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997 | RUSS LOAR
Apartment building owners and associations have contributed more than $24,000 to defeat the city's public-safety services fee that will come before voters next month. Councilman David John Shawver tried Tuesday night to convince members of the Apartment Assn. of Orange County that they have made a mistake. "It's hard for me to sit back and see money that's coming from the outside, not even from within my community, that's going to take away my police and fire services," Shawver said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
Hoping to mollify business people upset about a recently imposed 6% utility tax, the City Council has agreed to postpone a decision to increase many city fees until after a special meeting today. Council members will hold the joint session today with the Stanton Chamber of Commerce. They have also pledged $7,000 to a new campaign called Buy and Shop in Stanton (BASIS), which was planned by the chamber and city staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
The City Council has decided to consider a 6% tax on utilities to help offset a projected $1.4-million budget deficit for the 1993-94 fiscal year. Council members also said last week that they favor raising the fees for many city services. The council must hold two public hearings before imposing the utilities tax. The city would not receive income from the proposed tax until June or July. The 1993-94 fiscal year starts July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
A 6% tax on residential and commercial utility users will be up for a final vote tonight at a City Council meeting. The utility tax, which city officials say could raise $1 million yearly, was tentatively approved after a public hearing two weeks ago, though a handful of residents criticized the decision, saying the city wastes money. The city's budget is about $8.25 million. Officials say the city could face a $1.4-million deficit next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
The City Council has approved a reduction of the utility tax to 5% from 6%. The council reviews the levy every year and lowers or raises it depending on the state of the city's treasury. "We are in good financial shape," Councilman Sal Sapien said at this week's meeting. The change in rates goes into effect Sept. 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few years ago, the tiny city of Stanton was faced with a huge problem: It was running out of money. No funds to sweep the streets, remove the garbage and pay the police officers. So two years ago it did what most cash-starved governments do. It decided to tax its citizens, levying fees on electric, water and phone bills that produced $1.4 million a year and helped balance its $9.4-million operating budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few years ago, the tiny city of Stanton was faced with a huge problem: It was running out of money. No funds to sweep the streets, remove the garbage and pay the police officers. So two years ago it did what most cash-starved governments do. It decided to tax its citizens, levying fees on electric, water and phone bills that produced $1.4 million a year and helped balance its $9.4-million operating budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
The City Council has approved a reduction of the utility tax to 5% from 6%. The council reviews the levy every year and lowers or raises it depending on the state of the city's treasury. "We are in good financial shape," Councilman Sal Sapien said at this week's meeting. The change in rates goes into effect Sept. 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1994 | TOM RAGAN
Two challengers elected to the City Council said they will try to usher in a reform attitude that consists of cleaning up the city and repealing a controversial utility tax that has raised the ire of hard-working residents. Brian Donahue, 56, a former council member, and David John Shawver, 47, a director of the Regional Occupational Program in Whittier, were the top two vote-getters in Tuesday's election, which saw the ousting of incumbents Don Martinez and Linda J. Pappas Diaz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A war of words between the City Council and Assemblyman Curt Pringle (R-Garden Grove) over a new city tax has escalated, with Pringle mailing 400 letters calling the tax "outrageous." At a March council meeting, Stanton Mayor Don Martinez blamed the 6% utility tax--intended to plug the city's $1.4-million budget deficit--on the "bums" in the state Legislature for shifting property taxes and other money from the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
Hoping to mollify business people upset about a recently imposed 6% utility tax, the City Council has agreed to postpone a decision to increase many city fees until after a special meeting today. Council members will hold the joint session today with the Stanton Chamber of Commerce. They have also pledged $7,000 to a new campaign called Buy and Shop in Stanton (BASIS), which was planned by the chamber and city staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
As expected, the City Council this week approved a 6% utility tax, which will begin appearing on gas, water, electricity and telephone bills starting in July. City officials said the utility tax is necessary because of a decrease in property taxes and other money that the state shares with cities. "The state continues to spend and spend and spend, so we are in the situation of raising money for them," Mayor Don Martinez told a packed council chamber at Tuesday's meeting.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The cities lie at either end of the local landscape, but if the failed utility tax elections in San Clemente and Stanton are any indication, it may be a long time before voters choose to tax themselves in Orange County. The resounding defeats came despite dire warnings from local officials that public safety and park services would suffer in the wake of Proposition 218, which requires that any new taxes and those imposed since January 1995 be approved by a voter majority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
A 6% tax on residential and commercial utility users will be up for a final vote tonight at a City Council meeting. The utility tax, which city officials say could raise $1 million yearly, was tentatively approved after a public hearing two weeks ago, though a handful of residents criticized the decision, saying the city wastes money. The city's budget is about $8.25 million. Officials say the city could face a $1.4-million deficit next year.
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