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Stanton Glantz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1998
On May 1, you reported that the American Beverage Institute released a study that said that California bars have incurred a 26% cut in sales since a smoking ban went into effect on Jan. 1. I have two related questions, both assuming the study to be accurate: Why is this a bad thing? Has the number of drunk-driving incidents also gone down? BOB STOCK Los Angeles As a bar owner, I am so tired of people like Stanton Glantz at UC San Francisco and Cynthia Hallett of Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, with their know-it-all comments regarding the smoking ban. Read my lips, our sales are down substantially.
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NEWS
August 19, 2010
A number of studies have established that kids who witness smoking -- either at home, on television or in the movies -- are more likely to take up smoking. That's why many public-health and anti-smoking groups have sought to reduce images of smoking on TV and in movies. Their efforts appear to be working. A study released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that, after a peak in 2005, the number of onscreen smoking depictions in U.S. movies declined 51%. Still, almost half of the 10 top-grossing movies in 2009 contained tobacco imagery, including 54% of PG-13 movies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1992
I was dismayed when I read the article about smoking in movies. I am sure it was Proposition 99 money which financed this 1 1/2-year study conducted by UC San Francisco professor of medicine Stanton Glantz. His most interesting comment was that "movies are a teaching device for kids." This explains all the mayhem, brutality and viciousness displayed by many of our young adults today, because our movies of the past few years seem to concentrate on these factors. There is more blood and gore in today's films than in all the years of filmmaking up to a few years ago. Glantz should be more concerned about that impact on our kids rather than what percentage of male, middle-class, youthful, heroic, attractive, etc., actors were smoking 20 and 30 years ago. What a waste of our tax money!
NEWS
November 14, 2002 | R. Kinsey Lowe
Armed with statistics about the relationship between the use of cigarettes in movies and smoking by young people, leaders of major health organizations went to the heart of Hollywood to denounce what they called the promotion of smoking in movies. The leader of an anti-smoking movement was joined by officials from the World Health Organization, Los Angeles County Director of Public Health Jonathan Fielding and the American Lung Assn. The American Medical Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996
Republican Assembly Speaker Curt Pringle wants to restrict the ability of the University of California to do research on the political power of the tobacco industry (June 27). Of course he does! The research that he wants to suppress is that of professor Stanton Glantz of UC San Francisco, whose previous publications have clearly shown if a politician takes money from the tobacco industry, then he will, very predictably, vote against tobacco- control legislation. Seventy-nine percent of politicians in the U.S. take money from Big Tobacco.
NEWS
November 14, 2002 | R. Kinsey Lowe
Armed with statistics about the relationship between the use of cigarettes in movies and smoking by young people, leaders of major health organizations went to the heart of Hollywood to denounce what they called the promotion of smoking in movies. The leader of an anti-smoking movement was joined by officials from the World Health Organization, Los Angeles County Director of Public Health Jonathan Fielding and the American Lung Assn. The American Medical Assn.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
A number of studies have established that kids who witness smoking -- either at home, on television or in the movies -- are more likely to take up smoking. That's why many public-health and anti-smoking groups have sought to reduce images of smoking on TV and in movies. Their efforts appear to be working. A study released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that, after a peak in 2005, the number of onscreen smoking depictions in U.S. movies declined 51%. Still, almost half of the 10 top-grossing movies in 2009 contained tobacco imagery, including 54% of PG-13 movies.
MAGAZINE
September 14, 1997
"Cold Turkey" (by Janet Wiscombe, Aug. 10) was well-researched and enlightening. I, for one, would welcome a society without tobacco and the ill effects it has on people. Another aspect of smoking not mentioned is the waste it creates. You cannot go to a park, beach, shopping mall, library, school, market or movie theater without seeing cigarette butts everywhere. How about the government quickly imposing an environmental tax on cigarettes while they are still legal? Paul Sowa Irvine The anti-tobacco people believe that if smoking is effectively banned, this would be a much healthier nation, diseases would just disappear and we would all live to be 100. Wishful thinking.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mysterious Federal Express package that catapulted Stanton Glantz from professor of medicine to defender of free speech arrived, unsolicited, on May 12, 1994. Whoever sent it had a sense of humor: The return address was listed as "Mr. Butts," the pro-smoking Doonesbury cartoon character. To the UC San Francisco scientist, the contents were priceless--4,000 pages of confidential documents from the Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., the nation's third-largest tobacco company.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A new study concludes that laws preventing smoking in bars have no adverse economic impact on the bars. The study, to be published today in the American Journal of Public Health, arrives just two months before a new California statute banning smoking in bars takes effect Jan. 1, 1998. Co-written by staunch anti-tobacco advocate Stanton A. Glantz, a professor at UC San Francisco Medical School, the study will probably be controversial.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2002 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If there's anywhere anyone can advertise about anything, it's Variety and the Hollywood Reporter. In the past few weeks I've spotted ads for a Greek Cruising Palace yacht rental, cage-free dog kennels, crew jacket catalogs and--talk about throwing away your money--"for your consideration" Oscar ads for "Planet of the Apes" But there's one ad neither of the Hollywood trades will run--the latest broadside from Smoke Free Movies, a health advocacy group...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1998
On May 1, you reported that the American Beverage Institute released a study that said that California bars have incurred a 26% cut in sales since a smoking ban went into effect on Jan. 1. I have two related questions, both assuming the study to be accurate: Why is this a bad thing? Has the number of drunk-driving incidents also gone down? BOB STOCK Los Angeles As a bar owner, I am so tired of people like Stanton Glantz at UC San Francisco and Cynthia Hallett of Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, with their know-it-all comments regarding the smoking ban. Read my lips, our sales are down substantially.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A new study concludes that laws preventing smoking in bars have no adverse economic impact on the bars. The study, to be published today in the American Journal of Public Health, arrives just two months before a new California statute banning smoking in bars takes effect Jan. 1, 1998. Co-written by staunch anti-tobacco advocate Stanton A. Glantz, a professor at UC San Francisco Medical School, the study will probably be controversial.
MAGAZINE
September 14, 1997
"Cold Turkey" (by Janet Wiscombe, Aug. 10) was well-researched and enlightening. I, for one, would welcome a society without tobacco and the ill effects it has on people. Another aspect of smoking not mentioned is the waste it creates. You cannot go to a park, beach, shopping mall, library, school, market or movie theater without seeing cigarette butts everywhere. How about the government quickly imposing an environmental tax on cigarettes while they are still legal? Paul Sowa Irvine The anti-tobacco people believe that if smoking is effectively banned, this would be a much healthier nation, diseases would just disappear and we would all live to be 100. Wishful thinking.
NEWS
May 20, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tweaking the tobacco industry, the state Senate has appointed one of the nation's leading anti-tobacco advocates to a board that oversees California's anti-tobacco advertising, research and education. The Senate Rules Committee appointed Stanton Glantz, a medical school professor at UC San Francisco, to the Tobacco Education and Research Oversight Committee, which advises the Department of Health Services on $100 million in annual expenditures for anti-tobacco campaigns and research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996
Republican Assembly Speaker Curt Pringle wants to restrict the ability of the University of California to do research on the political power of the tobacco industry (June 27). Of course he does! The research that he wants to suppress is that of professor Stanton Glantz of UC San Francisco, whose previous publications have clearly shown if a politician takes money from the tobacco industry, then he will, very predictably, vote against tobacco- control legislation. Seventy-nine percent of politicians in the U.S. take money from Big Tobacco.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2002 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If there's anywhere anyone can advertise about anything, it's Variety and the Hollywood Reporter. In the past few weeks I've spotted ads for a Greek Cruising Palace yacht rental, cage-free dog kennels, crew jacket catalogs and--talk about throwing away your money--"for your consideration" Oscar ads for "Planet of the Apes" But there's one ad neither of the Hollywood trades will run--the latest broadside from Smoke Free Movies, a health advocacy group...
NEWS
May 20, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tweaking the tobacco industry, the state Senate has appointed one of the nation's leading anti-tobacco advocates to a board that oversees California's anti-tobacco advertising, research and education. The Senate Rules Committee appointed Stanton Glantz, a medical school professor at UC San Francisco, to the Tobacco Education and Research Oversight Committee, which advises the Department of Health Services on $100 million in annual expenditures for anti-tobacco campaigns and research.
BOOKS
June 23, 1996 | Sheryl Stolberg, Sheryl Stolberg is a Times staff writer
There is no more pressing question in American public health today than the matter of what to do about cigarettes, the little white sticks of tobacco that claim some 420,000 American lives each year--more than AIDS, automobile accidents, homicides, suicide and alcohol abuse combined. If there is a single image that has become fixed in the public mind as a symbol of this controversy, it must be the photograph of what tobacco critics call "the Seven Dwarfs"': seven of the nation's top tobacco industry executives, standing side by side, right hands raised as they solemnly swore to Congress that they did not believe nicotine to be addictive.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mysterious Federal Express package that catapulted Stanton Glantz from professor of medicine to defender of free speech arrived, unsolicited, on May 12, 1994. Whoever sent it had a sense of humor: The return address was listed as "Mr. Butts," the pro-smoking Doonesbury cartoon character. To the UC San Francisco scientist, the contents were priceless--4,000 pages of confidential documents from the Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., the nation's third-largest tobacco company.
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