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Stanton Macdonald Wright

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July 28, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today's art museum weather report: After the storm, a rainbow. A gale of controversy accompanied the April 1996 sale at Christie's in New York of 29 photographs by Modernist innovator Paul Outerbridge Jr. that had been bequeathed to the Laguna Art Museum by his widow, Lois. Ranging from platinum prints of still lifes from the 1920s to darkly playful female nudes shot with an experimental color process, these works were among the highlights of the institution's 20th century holdings.
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August 6, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Between his arrival in Santa Monica with his family as a 10-year-old in 1900 and his death at home in Pacific Palisades in 1973, Stanton Macdonald-Wright spent all but nine years of his life as a painter working in Los Angeles. It simply isn't possible to understand 20th century art in L.A. without understanding Macdonald-Wright's work and career. And because it's not possible to understand 20th century art in general without understanding art made in L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Between his arrival in Santa Monica with his family as a 10-year-old in 1900 and his death at home in Pacific Palisades in 1973, Stanton Macdonald-Wright spent all but nine years of his life as a painter working in Los Angeles. It simply isn't possible to understand 20th century art in L.A. without understanding Macdonald-Wright's work and career. And because it's not possible to understand 20th century art in general without understanding art made in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Stanton Macdonald-Wright may be Southern California's quintessential Renaissance man. Make that eccentrically quintessential. A pioneering, if little-known, painter who lived from 1890 to 1973, he is credited with bringing Modern art to Los Angeles. But that is only the most visible layer of his persona.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Stanton Macdonald-Wright may be Southern California's quintessential Renaissance man. Make that eccentrically quintessential. A pioneering, if little-known, painter who lived from 1890 to 1973, he is credited with bringing Modern art to Los Angeles. But that is only the most visible layer of his persona.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2001
Stanton Macdonald-Wright has always been a background influence for my work as I paint alone in my studio. But the few paintings I had seen by him did not affect me as strongly as seeing many of the "Synchromies" together at LACMA ("A Painter's Many Layers," by Suzanne Muchnic, Aug. 5). Muchnic did a wonderful job illuminating this pivotal artist who has, for some reason, gotten lost in the shuffle when he should be honored as the grandfather of the California Light-and-Space movement as well as current Los Angeles artists' interest in Oriental art and Zen Buddhism.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2001
* Area: One, featuring Moby, Outkast, New Order and others, plays the Glen Helen Blockbuster Pavilion, 2575 Glen Helen Parkway, Devore, at 4:30 p.m. Aug. 5. $39 to $59. (909) 886-8742.* "Meetin's on the Porch," Donald MacKechnie's romantic drama about three women sharing long-kept secrets, plays next Thursday to Sept. 8 at the Victory Theatre, 3326 W. Victory Blvd., Burbank, $18. (818) 841-5421.* "Blue's Clues Live!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2001
"Color, Myth and Music: Stanton Macdonald-Wright and Synchromism," opening Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, looks at the life and works of the provocative and pioneering Modernist who became a leading advocate of Modernism here. The 60-year survey focuses on Synchromist paintings--conceived as equivalents to musical compositions--but also includes the artist's lesser-known portraits, landscapes, still lifes and WPA murals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2010 | By Martha Groves
It may well be the tamest jail-related riot ever. Two mundane relics from Santa Monica's Depression-era lockup have sparked a frenzy of interest from architectural buffs and home hardware aficionados. In the two weeks since the city announced that it would give away two doorknobs from the shuttered jail, more than 20 people have tried to stake claim to them. By all accounts, the competition is fierce. The lockup, a Moderne-style building that was completed in 1939, was designed by two Los Angeles architects and featured Gladding, McBean ceramic tiles and Stanton Macdonald-Wright murals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT
Now that it's widely acknowledged that more interesting new art comes from studios scattered across the sprawl of L.A. than just about anywhere else on the planet, the UCLA Hammer Museum had the bright idea of grabbing a quick cross-section of the newest of the new. Thus was born "Snapshot: New Art From Los Angeles" (June 3-Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today's art museum weather report: After the storm, a rainbow. A gale of controversy accompanied the April 1996 sale at Christie's in New York of 29 photographs by Modernist innovator Paul Outerbridge Jr. that had been bequeathed to the Laguna Art Museum by his widow, Lois. Ranging from platinum prints of still lifes from the 1920s to darkly playful female nudes shot with an experimental color process, these works were among the highlights of the institution's 20th century holdings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1989 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Anyone familiar with lithography knows the name Clinton Adams. Recognized artist, UCLA prof by the late '40s, Clinton also co-inspired--along with June Wayne--the now famous Tamarind Lithography Workshop, seedbed for the '70s print revival in this country. Billed as a limited retrospective (the size and number of works underscores the "limited" part), this show includes both prints and paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
Master artworks from two different epochs visit San Francisco: The M. H. de Young Memorial Museum hosts "The New Painting, Impressionism 1874-1886," Thursday to July 6, while "The Vital Gesture: Franz Kline in Retrospect" opens Saturday at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and remains on view through June 8. "The New Painting" celebrates eight Impressionist exhibitions held in Paris between 1874 and 1886.
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