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Staph Infection

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NATIONAL
March 3, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Department of Public Health is investigating how five men in Boston were infected with a drug-resistant staph infection. Doctors at Fenway Community Health Center last fall started seeing patients with pneumonia, sinus infections and skin conditions caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a bacteria usually caught only in hospitals by patients already sick.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Staph infections remain a significant problem for hospital patients, and scientists are trying to develop vaccines to prevent Staphylococcus aureus bacteria from establishing itself in vital areas like the heart, lungs or blood. But it's turning out to be a difficult task: A promising vaccine intended to protect heart-surgery patients from staph infections worked no better than a placebo, a new study reported . Making matters worse, patients who developed staph infections despite getting the vaccine were more likely to die than infected patients who got the placebo, the study found.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1986 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
An Encinitas carpenter who was hospitalized for a staph infection he contracted after surfing at sewage-contaminated Cardiff State Beach has filed a $1-million claim against three government agencies, charging them with negligence.
SPORTS
June 10, 2011 | Wire reports
Ichiro Suzuki was not in the starting lineup for the Seattle Mariners for Friday night's game against the Detroit Tigers. Manager Eric Wedge said he wanted to give his slumping outfielder the night off, although he did not rule out the possibility that Suzuki would pinch-hit or pinch-run. Suzuki has played in 255 consecutive games, the third-longest streak in team history. Suzuki, who is hitting .252 this season, didn't speak to reporters before the game. He's hitting .149 since May 19. Etc. Atlanta left fielder Martin Prado has been placed on the 15-day disabled list with a staph infection in his right calf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
A Downey High School wrestler has died after being hospitalized for 20 days with pneumonia and other complications of a staph infection. Noah Armendariz, 17, died Sunday at Children's Hospital of Orange County, said his mother, Cynthia Magana. The infection was caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, or MSSA, Magana said. Another form of S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2006 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
For surfers who work 9 to 5, solace comes on weekends when they can paddle out at their favorite beach. For surf videographer Timmy Turner, it was never that simple. From his home in Huntington Beach, he traveled to France, Bolivia, South Africa and Australia, all before turning 16. Now at 25, the journey has led him home again -- this time fighting for his life against a virulent staph infection that developed after a trip to Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2007 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
State health and education officials are preaching calm -- and cleanliness -- to discourage panic over an antibiotic-resistant "superbug" that has become a focus of fear nationwide after being implicated in the deaths of students in New York and Virginia. "There is absolutely no panic, nor should there be," said State Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell, responding to a string of cases of methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus, or MRSA, in Sacramento and East Bay-area schools.
SPORTS
June 27, 2009 | Staff And Wire Reports
Former Cleveland Browns receiver Joe Jurevicius sued the team and the Cleveland Clinic on Friday, saying the team misrepresented the cleanliness of its training facility and blaming doctors for what he called negligence over a staph infection in his right knee that kept him from playing last year. The lawsuit alleges that physicians Anthony Miniaci and Richard Figler failed to warn Jurevicius that therapy equipment was not always sanitized at the team's training facility in suburban Berea, Ohio.
SPORTS
November 8, 1990
Mario Lemieux of the Pittsburgh Penguins, who developed a staph infection in his lower back after undergoing surgery last July, has improved but cannot resume exercising until next month.
SPORTS
June 10, 2011 | Wire reports
Ichiro Suzuki was not in the starting lineup for the Seattle Mariners for Friday night's game against the Detroit Tigers. Manager Eric Wedge said he wanted to give his slumping outfielder the night off, although he did not rule out the possibility that Suzuki would pinch-hit or pinch-run. Suzuki has played in 255 consecutive games, the third-longest streak in team history. Suzuki, who is hitting .252 this season, didn't speak to reporters before the game. He's hitting .149 since May 19. Etc. Atlanta left fielder Martin Prado has been placed on the 15-day disabled list with a staph infection in his right calf.
SPORTS
May 15, 2011 | By Jim Peltz
One exception to the Dodgers' weak offense of late is Aaron Miles . The veteran utility infielder went three for four Sunday with three singles, giving him 13 hits in his last eight games. The switch-hitter's batting average in that span has jumped to .292 from .247. The 34-year-old Miles, who made the club as a non-roster invitee in spring training after playing for the St. Louis Cardinals last year, got a slow start this season but has picked up steam. "I felt when I was hanging around .240, .230, that I was still swinging [the bat]
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Determining whether a staph infection can be effectively treated with common antibiotics such as methicillin, penicillin and amoxicillin may soon get a little quicker. The FDA has just cleared a new test that can rapidly assess whether the infection-causing bacteria are methicillin-resistant. Current lab methods take one to two days for a result, according to the new test's manufacturer . The FDA says the new test, which uses a sample of the patient's blood, can determine whether the infection is caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus  (commonly known as MRSA)
SPORTS
May 3, 2011 | By Jim Peltz
Jay Gibbons was beginning to wonder whether his eyes would ever allow him to play in the major leagues again. "It definitely crept through my mind more than once that this was not going to get better," Gibbons said Tuesday after being reinstated with the Dodgers. He replaced Marcus Thames , who was put on the 15-day disabled list because of a right quadriceps strain. Starting in spring training, Gibbons struggled to find the correct contact lenses, especially in his right eye, leaving him unable to handle big league pitching and to break camp with the Dodgers.
SCIENCE
August 10, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Dangerous infections caused by the bacterium methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, appear to be declining in healthcare settings across the nation, the federal government reported Tuesday. An analysis conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a 28% drop in cases of MRSA contracted in hospitals from 2005 to 2008 and a 17% decrease in cases contracted outside the hospital but among people who had had kidney dialysis or had been in a hospital or nursing home in the prior year.
SPORTS
July 18, 2009 | Jim Peltz
James Loney is again proving himself a consistent hitter, even if the Dodgers' first baseman has yet to reach his potential in the eyes of Manager Joe Torre. Loney, 25, had hit safely in 12 consecutive games before going 0 for 3 in Friday's 8-1 loss to the Houston Astros, batting .304 (14 for 46) during the streak. It was Loney's longest streak of the season, topping an 11-game streak from May 17-28, when the Texas native batted .370. The latest streak lifted Loney's overall average to .
SPORTS
June 27, 2009 | Staff And Wire Reports
Former Cleveland Browns receiver Joe Jurevicius sued the team and the Cleveland Clinic on Friday, saying the team misrepresented the cleanliness of its training facility and blaming doctors for what he called negligence over a staph infection in his right knee that kept him from playing last year. The lawsuit alleges that physicians Anthony Miniaci and Richard Figler failed to warn Jurevicius that therapy equipment was not always sanitized at the team's training facility in suburban Berea, Ohio.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Determining whether a staph infection can be effectively treated with common antibiotics such as methicillin, penicillin and amoxicillin may soon get a little quicker. The FDA has just cleared a new test that can rapidly assess whether the infection-causing bacteria are methicillin-resistant. Current lab methods take one to two days for a result, according to the new test's manufacturer . The FDA says the new test, which uses a sample of the patient's blood, can determine whether the infection is caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus  (commonly known as MRSA)
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A revolutionary way to combat deadly antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" has been developed by researchers at UC Davis, perhaps paving the way for a new class of drugs to supplement antibiotics. Rather than killing the bacteria, the researchers have made an end-run around the ability of bacteria to resist antibiotics--by attacking the mechanism through which they release toxins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
A Downey High School wrestler has died after being hospitalized for 20 days with pneumonia and other complications of a staph infection. Noah Armendariz, 17, died Sunday at Children's Hospital of Orange County, said his mother, Cynthia Magana. The infection was caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, or MSSA, Magana said. Another form of S.
OPINION
January 14, 2008
The staph superbug known as MRSA has been around a long time. But only a few months ago was it revealed that the antibiotic-resistant bacterium has spread beyond the occasional hospital and now kills more Americans than AIDS. Rather than fomenting panic, this knowledge should provoke us to take a long-overdue look at hospital procedures, pharmaceutical development and even farming methods.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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