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NEWS
April 16, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
The new study about drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus found in meat and poultry samples certainly sounds alarming -- such bacteria can cause serious infections in humans and can even lead to death. But consumers face a relatively small direct threat from the bacteria in food, and a few simple precautions should provide short-term peace of mind. Long-term peace of mind may take longer. It does seem possible that the meat industry is contributing to antibiotic resistance in some way. The FDA was concerned enough last year to urge that the meat industry use antibiotics only when necessary.
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SCIENCE
September 16, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Estimated cases of infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, fell more than 30% in the U.S. between 2005 and 2011, suggesting that heightened efforts to combat the infections in hospitals had made a difference, researchers wrote Monday in the online edition of JAMA Internal Medicine. But another report, also published online in the journal, found that people who lived closest to farms had higher rates of MRSA infection than people who lived farthest from farms - reflecting ongoing concerns about antibiotic use in agriculture and its effects on human health.
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NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Staph infections remain a significant problem for hospital patients, and scientists are trying to develop vaccines to prevent Staphylococcus aureus bacteria from establishing itself in vital areas like the heart, lungs or blood. But it's turning out to be a difficult task: A promising vaccine intended to protect heart-surgery patients from staph infections worked no better than a placebo, a new study reported . Making matters worse, patients who developed staph infections despite getting the vaccine were more likely to die than infected patients who got the placebo, the study found.
SCIENCE
May 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Using antibacterial soap and ointments to treat all patients in an intensive care unit - not just those who test positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA - reduced presence of the antibiotic-resistant superbug by 37% and blood-borne infections in general by 44%, researchers said. The finding suggests that the current practice of testing incoming patients for MRSA and isolating the ones who seem to have the bug on their bodies - which is recommended by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention and mandated by nine states including California - might not be the best way to fight MRSA, which accounts for more healthcare-associated infections than any other bug. ICU patients “are all high risk.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
Perhaps you missed last week's coverage of a new "superbug. " If so, here's a recap. ... First came the heads-up notice from British researchers, detailed in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases, about an antibiotic-resistant bacterium that appeared to have made its way to the United Kingdom from Asia; this, in turn, led to a few days of hysteria-filled headlines (one standout: "Superbug Panics World"). The furor died down fairly quickly, replaced by concerns about a spouse's potential to cheat and hearing loss in teenagers . Here's Los Angeles Times staff writer Thomas H. Maugh II putting it in perspective: " Fears of a new superbug from Asia may be overblown, experts say. " But the specter of increasingly ineffective antibiotics has not faded, despite some progress against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, in healthcare settings.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A new strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA, has been discovered in cows and humans in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in Europe, researchers reported Thursday. The new strain disturbs researchers because it evades one of the most commonly used tests to detect MRSA, which could lead physicians to prescribe the wrong antibiotics to treat the infection. The new strain of the bacterium is still relatively rare and, so far, no deaths have been attributed to it, the team reported in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases.
SCIENCE
September 16, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Estimated cases of infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, fell more than 30% in the U.S. between 2005 and 2011, suggesting that heightened efforts to combat the infections in hospitals had made a difference, researchers wrote Monday in the online edition of JAMA Internal Medicine. But another report, also published online in the journal, found that people who lived closest to farms had higher rates of MRSA infection than people who lived farthest from farms - reflecting ongoing concerns about antibiotic use in agriculture and its effects on human health.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
MRSA, the potentially deadly bacteria more formally known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, has grabbed quite a few headlines this week.  Canadian researchers found MRSA (and VRE, other drug-resistant bacteria) in bedbugs in Vancouver; and American researchers found MRSA and other staph bacteria on a few samples of supermarket meat in Detroit.  The superbug news comes a month after researchers from a nonprofit biomedical research center found that about half of the grocery store meat they sampled was contaminated with staph bacteria , about half of which were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics.
SCIENCE
May 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Using antibacterial soap and ointments to treat all patients in an intensive care unit - not just those who test positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA - reduced presence of the antibiotic-resistant superbug by 37% and blood-borne infections in general by 44%, researchers said. The finding suggests that the current practice of testing incoming patients for MRSA and isolating the ones who seem to have the bug on their bodies - which is recommended by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention and mandated by nine states including California - might not be the best way to fight MRSA, which accounts for more healthcare-associated infections than any other bug. ICU patients “are all high risk.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | JILL BETTNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 35-year-old Santa Barbara triathlete stricken with a rare and virulent streptococcus infection--which has become notorious as the "flesh-eating" bacteria--was better Thursday afternoon, but remained in critical condition at the Sherman Oaks Hospital burn center.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Staph infections remain a significant problem for hospital patients, and scientists are trying to develop vaccines to prevent Staphylococcus aureus bacteria from establishing itself in vital areas like the heart, lungs or blood. But it's turning out to be a difficult task: A promising vaccine intended to protect heart-surgery patients from staph infections worked no better than a placebo, a new study reported . Making matters worse, patients who developed staph infections despite getting the vaccine were more likely to die than infected patients who got the placebo, the study found.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A new strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA, has been discovered in cows and humans in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in Europe, researchers reported Thursday. The new strain disturbs researchers because it evades one of the most commonly used tests to detect MRSA, which could lead physicians to prescribe the wrong antibiotics to treat the infection. The new strain of the bacterium is still relatively rare and, so far, no deaths have been attributed to it, the team reported in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
MRSA, the potentially deadly bacteria more formally known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, has grabbed quite a few headlines this week.  Canadian researchers found MRSA (and VRE, other drug-resistant bacteria) in bedbugs in Vancouver; and American researchers found MRSA and other staph bacteria on a few samples of supermarket meat in Detroit.  The superbug news comes a month after researchers from a nonprofit biomedical research center found that about half of the grocery store meat they sampled was contaminated with staph bacteria , about half of which were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics.
NEWS
April 16, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
The new study about drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus found in meat and poultry samples certainly sounds alarming -- such bacteria can cause serious infections in humans and can even lead to death. But consumers face a relatively small direct threat from the bacteria in food, and a few simple precautions should provide short-term peace of mind. Long-term peace of mind may take longer. It does seem possible that the meat industry is contributing to antibiotic resistance in some way. The FDA was concerned enough last year to urge that the meat industry use antibiotics only when necessary.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
Perhaps you missed last week's coverage of a new "superbug. " If so, here's a recap. ... First came the heads-up notice from British researchers, detailed in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases, about an antibiotic-resistant bacterium that appeared to have made its way to the United Kingdom from Asia; this, in turn, led to a few days of hysteria-filled headlines (one standout: "Superbug Panics World"). The furor died down fairly quickly, replaced by concerns about a spouse's potential to cheat and hearing loss in teenagers . Here's Los Angeles Times staff writer Thomas H. Maugh II putting it in perspective: " Fears of a new superbug from Asia may be overblown, experts say. " But the specter of increasingly ineffective antibiotics has not faded, despite some progress against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, in healthcare settings.
SCIENCE
August 10, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Dangerous infections caused by the bacterium methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, appear to be declining in healthcare settings across the nation, the federal government reported Tuesday. An analysis conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a 28% drop in cases of MRSA contracted in hospitals from 2005 to 2008 and a 17% decrease in cases contracted outside the hospital but among people who had had kidney dialysis or had been in a hospital or nursing home in the prior year.
FOOD
June 19, 1986 | TOM SIETSEMA, The Washington Post
"Safe Food to Go," the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recently issued guide to out-of-home food handling, reminds us that salmonella (a bacteria present in some raw or undercooked food, or food that has come into contact with infected raw food) and Staphylococcus aureus (a bacteria sometimes spread by the handling of food) are no strangers any time of the year.
SCIENCE
August 10, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Dangerous infections caused by the bacterium methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, appear to be declining in healthcare settings across the nation, the federal government reported Tuesday. An analysis conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a 28% drop in cases of MRSA contracted in hospitals from 2005 to 2008 and a 17% decrease in cases contracted outside the hospital but among people who had had kidney dialysis or had been in a hospital or nursing home in the prior year.
FOOD
June 19, 1986 | TOM SIETSEMA, The Washington Post
"Safe Food to Go," the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recently issued guide to out-of-home food handling, reminds us that salmonella (a bacteria present in some raw or undercooked food, or food that has come into contact with infected raw food) and Staphylococcus aureus (a bacteria sometimes spread by the handling of food) are no strangers any time of the year.
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