Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStaphylococcus Aureus
IN THE NEWS

Staphylococcus Aureus

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
June 19, 1986 | TOM SIETSEMA, The Washington Post
"Safe Food to Go," the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recently issued guide to out-of-home food handling, reminds us that salmonella (a bacteria present in some raw or undercooked food, or food that has come into contact with infected raw food) and Staphylococcus aureus (a bacteria sometimes spread by the handling of food) are no strangers any time of the year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
August 15, 2011 | By Daniela Hernandez, Los Angeles Times
The kids may have a blast at those fast-food restaurant playgrounds — but so did kids the day before, and the day before and the day before. So who's making sure they're kept clean? There are no national guidelines, and within states, counties and cities, oversight often falls through the cracks: Health departments may inspect restaurants for cleanliness and food safety but not necessarily the play areas. This really steams mother-of-four Erin Carr-Jordan of Chandler, Ariz., who has embarked on a crusade after encountering what she called "unacceptable" conditions at a McDonald's playland in Tempe.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
August 10, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Dangerous infections caused by the bacterium methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, appear to be declining in healthcare settings across the nation, the federal government reported Tuesday. An analysis conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a 28% drop in cases of MRSA contracted in hospitals from 2005 to 2008 and a 17% decrease in cases contracted outside the hospital but among people who had had kidney dialysis or had been in a hospital or nursing home in the prior year.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Determining whether a staph infection can be effectively treated with common antibiotics such as methicillin, penicillin and amoxicillin may soon get a little quicker. The FDA has just cleared a new test that can rapidly assess whether the infection-causing bacteria are methicillin-resistant. Current lab methods take one to two days for a result, according to the new test's manufacturer . The FDA says the new test, which uses a sample of the patient's blood, can determine whether the infection is caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus  (commonly known as MRSA)
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Hey, hand sanitizers. You can only do so much – and preventing MRSA infection isn’t one of those things -- so stop over-promising! That was the gist of warning letters from the Food and Drug Administration to four makers of the popular products. Apparently, the manufacturers of Staphaseptic, Safe4Hours, Dr. Tichenor’s and CleanWell products had suggested that various gels, protectants and what-not could protect against infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.
OPINION
October 19, 2007
Re "Deadly 'superbug' infections spread," Oct. 17 Those who do not believe in evolution, take note. Ross Billings Corona del Mar -- The alarming reports in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. outlining the extent of two "superbug" infections should chasten those who call for ever-more-stringent regulation of pharmaceutical companies and their products.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Determining whether a staph infection can be effectively treated with common antibiotics such as methicillin, penicillin and amoxicillin may soon get a little quicker. The FDA has just cleared a new test that can rapidly assess whether the infection-causing bacteria are methicillin-resistant. Current lab methods take one to two days for a result, according to the new test's manufacturer . The FDA says the new test, which uses a sample of the patient's blood, can determine whether the infection is caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus  (commonly known as MRSA)
SCIENCE
September 14, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Health authorities have detected the emergence of a rare but deadly lung-destroying form of pneumonia, sparked by the combination of a skin infection and the common flu. The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 22 deaths among children last year from the dual infection. Numbers from the 2007-2008 flu season won't be released until next month, but officials say deaths have increased. The CDC has just begun tracking cases among all age groups. The number of fatalities, though low, is a sharp increase from previous years, and infectious disease experts worry that an ongoing epidemic of skin infections could drive the numbers higher.
OPINION
February 20, 2008
Re " 'Superbug' staph reports required," Feb. 15 The California Department of Public Health's move to require local health departments to report severe infections originating outside healthcare facilities is an important first step in controlling the spread of antibiotic-resistant staph infections. But much more needs to be done. Expanding reporting requirements to hospitals is important but will not fully address the problem of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, if hospitals have no incentive to provide accurate data.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | SANDRA G. BOODMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Everyone knows that doctors should wash their hands before examining patients. But what about their stethoscopes? A study published recently in the Annals of Emergency Medicine has found that the instruments--arguably the most commonly used in medicine--are an important and largely overlooked source of infection because they are cleaned infrequently, if at all.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Hey, hand sanitizers. You can only do so much – and preventing MRSA infection isn’t one of those things -- so stop over-promising! That was the gist of warning letters from the Food and Drug Administration to four makers of the popular products. Apparently, the manufacturers of Staphaseptic, Safe4Hours, Dr. Tichenor’s and CleanWell products had suggested that various gels, protectants and what-not could protect against infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
There's been a lot of talk recently about NDM-1, a gene that gives many bacteria a weapon against carbapenems, an important class of antibiotics. Because many of these bacteria are already resistant to other classes of antibiotics, NDM-1 renders them immune to almost anything we throw at them. This is bad news indeed. NDM-1 has been found in India and Pakistan mainly, but cases are popping up in Britain and other nations in which a lot of people travel to and from that part of the world.
SCIENCE
August 10, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Dangerous infections caused by the bacterium methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, appear to be declining in healthcare settings across the nation, the federal government reported Tuesday. An analysis conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a 28% drop in cases of MRSA contracted in hospitals from 2005 to 2008 and a 17% decrease in cases contracted outside the hospital but among people who had had kidney dialysis or had been in a hospital or nursing home in the prior year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2009 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
Take this as a cautionary tale. The man was covered in sweat, clutching his chest, when he entered an emergency room on Thanksgiving some years back. His words are fixed in the memory of Dr. Mark Morocco, associate residency director of emergency medicine at UCLA. "I just ate a lot of meatballs. . . . Oh, my God, here it comes!" he said, then vomited into a sink in the triage area. The diagnosis? More than a dozen of his mother's meatballs, all crammed into his stomach.
SCIENCE
September 14, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Health authorities have detected the emergence of a rare but deadly lung-destroying form of pneumonia, sparked by the combination of a skin infection and the common flu. The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 22 deaths among children last year from the dual infection. Numbers from the 2007-2008 flu season won't be released until next month, but officials say deaths have increased. The CDC has just begun tracking cases among all age groups. The number of fatalities, though low, is a sharp increase from previous years, and infectious disease experts worry that an ongoing epidemic of skin infections could drive the numbers higher.
OPINION
February 20, 2008
Re " 'Superbug' staph reports required," Feb. 15 The California Department of Public Health's move to require local health departments to report severe infections originating outside healthcare facilities is an important first step in controlling the spread of antibiotic-resistant staph infections. But much more needs to be done. Expanding reporting requirements to hospitals is important but will not fully address the problem of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, if hospitals have no incentive to provide accurate data.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
There's been a lot of talk recently about NDM-1, a gene that gives many bacteria a weapon against carbapenems, an important class of antibiotics. Because many of these bacteria are already resistant to other classes of antibiotics, NDM-1 renders them immune to almost anything we throw at them. This is bad news indeed. NDM-1 has been found in India and Pakistan mainly, but cases are popping up in Britain and other nations in which a lot of people travel to and from that part of the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2009 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
Take this as a cautionary tale. The man was covered in sweat, clutching his chest, when he entered an emergency room on Thanksgiving some years back. His words are fixed in the memory of Dr. Mark Morocco, associate residency director of emergency medicine at UCLA. "I just ate a lot of meatballs. . . . Oh, my God, here it comes!" he said, then vomited into a sink in the triage area. The diagnosis? More than a dozen of his mother's meatballs, all crammed into his stomach.
OPINION
October 19, 2007
Re "Deadly 'superbug' infections spread," Oct. 17 Those who do not believe in evolution, take note. Ross Billings Corona del Mar -- The alarming reports in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. outlining the extent of two "superbug" infections should chasten those who call for ever-more-stringent regulation of pharmaceutical companies and their products.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | SANDRA G. BOODMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Everyone knows that doctors should wash their hands before examining patients. But what about their stethoscopes? A study published recently in the Annals of Emergency Medicine has found that the instruments--arguably the most commonly used in medicine--are an important and largely overlooked source of infection because they are cleaned infrequently, if at all.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|