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Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteria

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SCIENCE
July 16, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gold-colored strains of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria tend to cause more disease than colorless strains because they carry antioxidants to protect themselves against immune system attack, researchers reported Monday in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. Victor Nizet of UC San Diego and colleagues found that the antioxidant compounds, called carotenoids, help defend the colored bacteria from toxic molecules made by immune system cells called neutrophils.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2008 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Responding to concerns about antibiotic-resistant "superbug" staph infections, California will now require local health departments to report all severe infections originating outside healthcare facilities, but not cases contracted in hospitals or nursing homes.
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HEALTH
November 4, 2002 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
It's a paradox of modern medicine: High-tech marvels such as heart surgery and kidney transplants are helping people live longer, but they're also providing new targets for a dangerous type of bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus causes about half a million infections -- sometimes referred to as staph infections -- a year. The infections often occur in people who have had surgery to insert heart valves and stents, catheters, even artificial hip joints. And because S.
HEALTH
January 22, 2007 | From Times wire reports
A nasty staph germ circulating in the community and some hospitals produces a poison that can kill pneumonia patients within 72 hours, researchers have reported. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria -- staph for short -- can pass one another the gene for the toxin and are apparently swapping it more often, the researchers reported in the Jan. 19 issue of the journal Science. The toxin, called Panton Valentine leukocidin, or PVL, can itself cause pneumonia and can kill healthy tissue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1999
New York scientists have reported the fourth instance of a hospitalized patient developing an infection with a strain of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to vancomycin--the antibiotic of last resort for bacteria that have developed resistance to all others. Vancomycin-resistant strains of bacteria could produce deadly epidemics if they escaped from the confines of a hospital.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved the first in a new class of antibiotics capable of fighting several different strains of drug-resistant bacteria, including a common infection called Staphylococcus aureus that public health officials regard as an increasingly worrisome bug. Zyvox, made by Pharmacia & Upjohn of Kalamazoo, Mich., is the second new antibiotic in recent months to be licensed by the FDA.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | Associated Press
Federal health officials said the deaths of four previously healthy children from a drug-resistant bacteria is not cause for panic, but they stress that doctors need to be aware that the bacteria has spread. "They need to be able to take this into account when they're making decisions about how to test for infections and how to treat them," said Dr. Timothy Naimi, an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One-quarter of all humans carry staph bacteria, but drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections were largely thought to be confined to hospitals and nursing homes.
HEALTH
January 22, 2007 | From Times wire reports
A nasty staph germ circulating in the community and some hospitals produces a poison that can kill pneumonia patients within 72 hours, researchers have reported. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria -- staph for short -- can pass one another the gene for the toxin and are apparently swapping it more often, the researchers reported in the Jan. 19 issue of the journal Science. The toxin, called Panton Valentine leukocidin, or PVL, can itself cause pneumonia and can kill healthy tissue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2008 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Responding to concerns about antibiotic-resistant "superbug" staph infections, California will now require local health departments to report all severe infections originating outside healthcare facilities, but not cases contracted in hospitals or nursing homes.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A revolutionary way to combat deadly antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" has been developed by researchers at UC Davis, perhaps paving the way for a new class of drugs to supplement antibiotics. Rather than killing the bacteria, the researchers have made an end-run around the ability of bacteria to resist antibiotics--by attacking the mechanism through which they release toxins.
SCIENCE
July 16, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gold-colored strains of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria tend to cause more disease than colorless strains because they carry antioxidants to protect themselves against immune system attack, researchers reported Monday in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. Victor Nizet of UC San Diego and colleagues found that the antioxidant compounds, called carotenoids, help defend the colored bacteria from toxic molecules made by immune system cells called neutrophils.
HEALTH
November 4, 2002 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
It's a paradox of modern medicine: High-tech marvels such as heart surgery and kidney transplants are helping people live longer, but they're also providing new targets for a dangerous type of bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus causes about half a million infections -- sometimes referred to as staph infections -- a year. The infections often occur in people who have had surgery to insert heart valves and stents, catheters, even artificial hip joints. And because S.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved the first in a new class of antibiotics capable of fighting several different strains of drug-resistant bacteria, including a common infection called Staphylococcus aureus that public health officials regard as an increasingly worrisome bug. Zyvox, made by Pharmacia & Upjohn of Kalamazoo, Mich., is the second new antibiotic in recent months to be licensed by the FDA.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | Associated Press
Federal health officials said the deaths of four previously healthy children from a drug-resistant bacteria is not cause for panic, but they stress that doctors need to be aware that the bacteria has spread. "They need to be able to take this into account when they're making decisions about how to test for infections and how to treat them," said Dr. Timothy Naimi, an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One-quarter of all humans carry staph bacteria, but drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections were largely thought to be confined to hospitals and nursing homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1999
New York scientists have reported the fourth instance of a hospitalized patient developing an infection with a strain of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to vancomycin--the antibiotic of last resort for bacteria that have developed resistance to all others. Vancomycin-resistant strains of bacteria could produce deadly epidemics if they escaped from the confines of a hospital.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A revolutionary way to combat deadly antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" has been developed by researchers at UC Davis, perhaps paving the way for a new class of drugs to supplement antibiotics. Rather than killing the bacteria, the researchers have made an end-run around the ability of bacteria to resist antibiotics--by attacking the mechanism through which they release toxins.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Department of Public Health is investigating how five men in Boston were infected with a drug-resistant staph infection. Doctors at Fenway Community Health Center last fall started seeing patients with pneumonia, sinus infections and skin conditions caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a bacteria usually caught only in hospitals by patients already sick.
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | From Associated Press
A staph germ that has resisted medicine's drug of last resort has shown up for the first time in the United States, the government said Thursday. "The timer is going off," said Dr. William Jarvis, a medical epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We were concerned it would emerge here, it has emerged here and we are concerned we're going to see it popping up in more places."
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