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BUSINESS
July 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mixed Verdict in Tuna-Dolphin Suit Against Star-Kist: A federal district court jury in Los Angeles has ruled that Star-Kist Foods Inc., a unit of H.J. Heinz Co., did not intentionally interfere with supply contracts with three Mexican fishing companies when it vowed in 1990 to buy only fish caught by dolphin-safe methods. But the jury found that Star-Kist did breach the contracts, awarding more than $100,000 in damages to Compania Mexicana de Tunidos and two other firms.
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BUSINESS
July 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mixed Verdict in Tuna-Dolphin Suit Against Star-Kist: A federal district court jury in Los Angeles has ruled that Star-Kist Foods Inc., a unit of H.J. Heinz Co., did not intentionally interfere with supply contracts with three Mexican fishing companies when it vowed in 1990 to buy only fish caught by dolphin-safe methods. But the jury found that Star-Kist did breach the contracts, awarding more than $100,000 in damages to Compania Mexicana de Tunidos and two other firms.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Moving to capitalize on the fast-growing cat food market, H. J. Heinz Co. on Tuesday said it had divided its Star-Kist Foods Inc. subsidiary in Long Beach into separate canned seafood and pet food operations. The canned seafood unit, which makes Star-Kist tuna, will be known as Star-Kist Seafood Co. The pet food division, whose flagship brand is 9-Lives cat food, will be called Heinz Pet Products Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Edney was there 40 years ago when America's tuna canning industry came of age on Terminal Island. And in its own way, he says, the gritty industrial heart of Los Angeles Harbor was every bit as important as New York's Ellis Island to the immigrants who found work in the canneries. Every day for decades, he remembers, thousands of cannery workers would come to work on the ferries from San Pedro or by car across the Henry Ford Bridge.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1987 | TIM WATERS, Times Staff Writer
Ambitious plans by a group of Los Angeles commercial fishermen to process mackerel at a cannery they bought from Star-Kist Foods ran into a snag last week when an essential ingredient failed to materialize--the fish. The San Pedro Fisherman's Cooperative Assn., a group of about 30 people who recently purchased the Terminal Island cannery for $1.6 million, were geared up to can mackerel starting last Monday. But the fish apparently sensed something was up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Edney was there 40 years ago when America's tuna canning industry came of age on Terminal Island. And in its own way, he says, the gritty industrial heart of Los Angeles Harbor was every bit as important as New York's Ellis Island to the immigrants who found work in the canneries. Every day for decades, he remembers, thousands of cannery workers would come to work on the ferries from San Pedro or by car across the Henry Ford Bridge.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
H. J. Heinz Co. subsidiary Star-Kist Foods announced a plan to fund research to reduce the number of dolphins killed in tuna fishing nets just days before animal rights activists plan to protest the company's alleged involvement in dolphin killings. Star-Kist spokesman Erik Bloemendaal said last week's announcement of the research funds was unrelated to a protest scheduled to take place Wednesday before Heinz's annual meeting in Pittsburgh.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Gerald R. Ford has banned tuna at his family table. But he's not worried about dolphins. He wants to save U.S. fishermen. "I am sad and angry, " Ford fumed in a May 4 letter to the three big tuna canners, who announced recently that they wouldn't buy any tuna caught in ways that kill dolphins. "This is a clear-cut case of unfair discrimination against American fishermen."
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The three biggest companies in the U.S. tuna industry on Thursday pledged not to buy or sell fish caught using methods that kill or injure dolphins. The move surprised but delighted environmentalists who have been waging a fierce grass-roots campaign to ban fishing techniques that kill an estimated 100,000 to 200,000 dolphins a year. The first announcement came from H. J. Heinz Co. and its Long Beach subsidiary, StarKist Seafood Co., the world's largest tuna canner.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Gerald R. Ford has banned tuna at his family table. But he's not worried about dolphins. He wants to save U.S. fishermen. "I am sad and angry, " Ford fumed in a May 4 letter to the three big tuna canners, who announced recently that they wouldn't buy any tuna caught in ways that kill dolphins. "This is a clear-cut case of unfair discrimination against American fishermen."
BUSINESS
April 14, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
The American tuna fishing industry, which has made a home here since World War II, has absorbed its share of shocks. Foreign governments have seized boats. Foreign fleets have slashed prices on tuna, aggressively selling their catch into the U.S. market. One U.S. cannery after another was shuttered. Still, the American fleet survived, if at times just barely. But the most devastating blow of all may have come Thursday, boat owners and industry officials say, when when the three largest U.S.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over salads, Weight Watchers entrees, dry crackers and talk of racehorses, two corporate chieftains met at lunch last December to discuss the fate of the world's dolphins. Two hours later, Jerry Moss, chairman of A & M Records Co., had become a catalyst to Anthony J. F. O'Reilly, chairman, president and chief executive of giant H. J. Heinz Co., who was pondering a change of policy for Heinz's subsidiary, StarKist Seafoods Co., the Long Beach-based tuna canner.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The three biggest companies in the U.S. tuna industry on Thursday pledged not to buy or sell fish caught using methods that kill or injure dolphins. The move surprised but delighted environmentalists who have been waging a fierce grass-roots campaign to ban fishing techniques that kill an estimated 100,000 to 200,000 dolphins a year. The first announcement came from H. J. Heinz Co. and its Long Beach subsidiary, StarKist Seafood Co., the world's largest tuna canner.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
H. J. Heinz Co. subsidiary Star-Kist Foods announced a plan to fund research to reduce the number of dolphins killed in tuna fishing nets just days before animal rights activists plan to protest the company's alleged involvement in dolphin killings. Star-Kist spokesman Erik Bloemendaal said last week's announcement of the research funds was unrelated to a protest scheduled to take place Wednesday before Heinz's annual meeting in Pittsburgh.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
The American tuna fishing industry, which has made a home here since World War II, has absorbed its share of shocks. Foreign governments have seized boats. Foreign fleets have slashed prices on tuna, aggressively selling their catch into the U.S. market. One U.S. cannery after another was shuttered. Still, the American fleet survived, if at times just barely. But the most devastating blow of all may have come Thursday, boat owners and industry officials say, when when the three largest U.S.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1987 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Struggling to preserve a market for local fishermen, a group of San Pedro fishing boat owners has agreed to buy the Star-Kist mackerel cannery on Terminal Island. The Fisherman's Cooperative Assn., an organization of about 30 boat owners, signed a letter of intent Wednesday to purchase the processing plant, which Long Beach-based Star-Kist Foods had planned to shut in about two weeks.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Moving to capitalize on the fast-growing cat food market, H. J. Heinz Co. on Tuesday said it had divided its Star-Kist Foods Inc. subsidiary in Long Beach into separate canned seafood and pet food operations. The canned seafood unit, which makes Star-Kist tuna, will be known as Star-Kist Seafood Co. The pet food division, whose flagship brand is 9-Lives cat food, will be called Heinz Pet Products Co.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1988 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
The federal government said on Thursday that it wants to stop H. J. Heinz, the owner of Star-Kist, from buying Bumble Bee Seafoods, saying the merger would mean higher prices for canned tuna. The Justice Department said it will file a lawsuit to halt the proposed $225-million acquisition of San Diego-based Bumble Bee because the merger was a "significant threat" to competition.
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