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Star Of India Ship

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December 25, 2003 | Duane Noriyuki, Times Staff Writer
In the winter of 1864, an iron ship newly christened Euterpe after the Greek goddess of music was sailing off the coast of Wales when she suffered her first collision and subsequent mutiny. Over the years, she has been trapped in ice, been tossed by storms, caught on fire and nearly left for dead. In 1906, her name was changed to the Star of India, and by World War II there was talk of dismantling the old lady and using her for scraps.
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NEWS
December 25, 2003 | Duane Noriyuki, Times Staff Writer
In the winter of 1864, an iron ship newly christened Euterpe after the Greek goddess of music was sailing off the coast of Wales when she suffered her first collision and subsequent mutiny. Over the years, she has been trapped in ice, been tossed by storms, caught on fire and nearly left for dead. In 1906, her name was changed to the Star of India, and by World War II there was talk of dismantling the old lady and using her for scraps.
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August 10, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles
For Ken Graydon, repairing cars was a living. But writing poetry and song lyrics and tall tales to be told and sung around a campfire was his passion. For anyone who thinks of poets as smallish, shy, intellectual fellows who look inward, Graydon was a shocker. He stood 6 feet 4 and, in his prime, weighed 220 pounds. His idea of a fine time was mixing with friends from the disparate worlds of poetry and classic cars, and swapping songs and stories long into the night. His voice was a strong baritone, and he was generous with praise for other versifiers.
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November 23, 2008 | Scott Martelle, Martelle, a freelance writer, is the author of "Blood Passion: The Ludlow Massacre and Class War in the American West."
Our mission -- beyond celebrating our 22nd wedding anniversary -- was to spend a weekend in San Diego in as eco-friendly a manner as we could, given two realities. One: Southern California's transportation system was designed by car salesmen. Two: We're really cheap. Both realities landed the trip in the "nice try" category, and I'm sure there's a polar bear somewhere grousing about us.
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