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Star Spangled Banner

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OPINION
September 13, 2007 | PATT MORRISON
When a politician starts beating the drum for a anti-flag-burning amendment to the Constitution, watch out -- he needs it to hide behind. Future felon Randy Cunningham, the "Duke" of California's 50th congressional district, proposed such an amendment not long before he went antique shopping with another future felon, a defense contractor who paid for the $12,000 worth of armoires and nightstands that Duke picked out as part of his fabulous bribe package.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Sarah Palin's upcoming cable series about the great outdoors officially has a theme song.  Sportsman Channel, which debuts "Amazing America with Sarah Palin" next week, enlisted the rock outfit Madison Rising for the tune. The group, self-described as "America's Most Patriotic Band," is probably best known for its unconventional rendering of "The Star Spangled Banner. " In keeping with the show's subject matter, the theme song's lyrics contain references to nature, flags, glory, dogs, horses, trucks and guns.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1990
Re "The Night Roseanne Sang at the Grand Old Game," Jack Mathews' July 28 article on Roseanne Barr singing the national anthem: Mathews asks, "Did (Barr) think Americans are so smitten with her lovable slob image that they'd enjoy the national anthem scratched on a blackboard?" Several years ago when Robert Goulet forgot the words of "The Star-Spangled Banner," a few people gasped--and life went on. If Barr were a male comic, the audience would have cheered! Let's get off the double standard!
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By David Ng
The Seattle Seahawks took home the Super Bowl championship on Sunday, roundly beating the Denver Broncos, 43-8. Another big winner for the evening was operatic soprano Renée Fleming, whose near flawless rendition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" provided a rousing start to pro football's biggest night.  Fleming, wearing a black dress with a white wrap, sang the national anthem to a recording provided by the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, with a...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1989
Regarding my comments in the Nov. 26 article "Experiencing Jimi Hendrix" and the letters to Calendar that followed: I did not mean to imply that the song "Machine Gun" related specifically to African-American soldiers or that Hendrix's "The Star Spangled Banner" had power only because Hendrix was black. What I was saying was that "The Star Spangled Banner" had power for me, as a black person, because of where the country was with civil rights and the anti-war effort. Every question that I was asked related to how Hendrix influenced me as a black musician coming up. If I had been asked other questions about his influence on white musicians, fashions or the like, I would have answered accordingly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Rev. Lucian Robinson Jr. considers himself a patriot and means no offense to God, country or Francis Scott Key, but he believes "The Star-Spangled Banner" is too doggone difficult to sing. So, Robinson has rewritten a few bars of the national anthem and added some words so folks at sporting events and patriotic gatherings can easily sing the song written by Key, the Washington lawyer who witnessed the Battle of Ft. McHenry on Sept. 13, 1814, and penned a poem to celebrate the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM
If you believe the football experts, this Sunday's Super Bowl game is going to be as one-sided as a compact disc. But no matter what happens on the field between the vaunted San Francisco 49ers and the disparaged Denver Broncos, Super Bowl XXIV is a game worth tuning in right from the start. It's at the start--before the opening kickoff, in fact--that the real contest will take place. We're not talking heads versus tails, John Elway versus Joe Montana, or tastes great versus less filling.
SPORTS
July 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
TV star Roseanne Barr defended her abrasive rendition of the national anthem at a San Diego Padres baseball game, saying the club knew they were not inviting an opera star to perform. "They didn't ask me to sing because I was Beverly Sills," Barr said in a telephone call Thursday night to Los Angeles television station KCAL-TV. "They knew and everyone in that crowd also . . . they know I can't sing. Or rather, that's how I sing, not that I can't sing, because I can."
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Take a controversial singing star, a trendy food store and a meat clerk trying to make a political statement. Put them together, and oh say, you can see what happened this week at Mrs. Gooch's of Beverly Hills. It all began when award-winning recording artist Sinead O'Connor went shopping at Mrs. Gooch's Natural Food Market on Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1997
This is Washington's revised ending for the "Star-Spangled Banner": "O'er the land of the freebies, and the home of the knaves." ANNE ASADORIAN Yorba Linda
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Francis Scott Key's handwritten manuscript of lyrics for the "Star-Spangled Banner" and the flag that inspired him to write them will be displayed together for the first time this summer. The reason for the special exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.: the 200th birthday of the flag, called the Star-Spangled Banner, that flew over Baltimore's Ft. McHenry in 1814. It was the flag Key saw from a ship several miles away "in the dawn's early light" that withstood the battle as British ships withdrew in defeat.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2012 | Richard Simon
For a piece of history that gave us the rockets' red glare and bombs bursting in air, the War of 1812 tends to evoke a collective "Huh?" on the U.S. side of the border with Canada. "The War of 1812 has no compelling narrative that appeals to the average American," said Jerald Podair, a history professor at Lawrence University in Wisconsin. "It's just a hodgepodge of buildings burning, bombs bursting in air and paintings being saved from the invaders, all for a vaguely defined purpose.
NATIONAL
July 4, 2008 | DeeDee Correll, Times Staff Writer
The jazz singer, invited to perform the national anthem before the Denver mayor's annual state of the city address, stood at the microphone and let loose her voice. What came out were the lyrics of the song known as the black national anthem, set to the tune of "The Star-Spangled Banner." "Lift ev'ry voice and sing, Till earth and heaven ring," belted out Rene Marie, as the expressions of city officials behind her grew puzzled.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2007 | Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- Inspired by the American flag flying after the 1814 British attack on Baltimore's Fort McHenry, Francis Scott Key wrote "O! say can you see" and penned the words that would become the national anthem. But at America's most popular history museum, the presentation of the famous flag -- the Star-Spangled Banner -- hasn't exactly taken the breath away.
OPINION
September 13, 2007 | PATT MORRISON
When a politician starts beating the drum for a anti-flag-burning amendment to the Constitution, watch out -- he needs it to hide behind. Future felon Randy Cunningham, the "Duke" of California's 50th congressional district, proposed such an amendment not long before he went antique shopping with another future felon, a defense contractor who paid for the $12,000 worth of armoires and nightstands that Duke picked out as part of his fabulous bribe package.
OPINION
May 2, 2006 | Ralph E. Shaffer and Walter P. Coombs, RALPH E. SHAFFER and WALTER P. COOMBS, professors emeriti at Cal Poly Pomona, also write for the History News Service. Scott Shaffer contributed to this article.
FROM TALK RADIO to the president, agitated Americans have expressed anger over the "desecration" of "The Star-Spangled Banner" -- a new version sung in Spanish. But the anthem, for more than a century, has been cheapened, insulted and even besmirched by well-intentioned but misguided Americans who think they can improve on it. Such conduct -- except when it touches the immigration question -- is now generally ignored.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1988
If Robertson is elected President: Will "Onward Christian Soldiers" replace the "Star Spangled Banner" as the national anthem? Will the Constitution be passed over in favor of the New Testament? Will we dispense with the Congress since Robertson will be able to negotiate directly with God on political and economic issues? Will non-Christians be considered second-class citizens? Will America be a democracy or a theocracy? KATHLEEN MORAN Los Angeles
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Francis Scott Key's handwritten manuscript of lyrics for the "Star-Spangled Banner" and the flag that inspired him to write them will be displayed together for the first time this summer. The reason for the special exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.: the 200th birthday of the flag, called the Star-Spangled Banner, that flew over Baltimore's Ft. McHenry in 1814. It was the flag Key saw from a ship several miles away "in the dawn's early light" that withstood the battle as British ships withdrew in defeat.
SPORTS
April 26, 2005 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
Poor Caroline Marcil. Singing -- or trying to sing -- "The Star-Spangled Banner" in front of thousands of sports fans is one of the most nerve-racking assignments in North America. And when the singer is not familiar with the piece ... well, Robert Goulet messed up one word at a heavyweight title fight in 1965 and has been answering for it ever since.
NEWS
September 2, 2004 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
It is ever intriguing to note how musicians from abroad find the elegance and dignity in our national anthem, which American-born or -trained conductors only rush through dutifully. Austrian conductor Martin Haselbock demonstrated that once again Tuesday night as he opened the Los Angeles Philharmonic's Hollywood Bowl concert with a rousing, hymn-like appreciation of "The Star-Spangled Banner." He then proceeded to lead a mixed-bag 18th century program with authority and panache.
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