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Star Trek Generations Movie

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BUSINESS
May 21, 1994 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the final episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" airs Monday, Paramount Pictures will pull the plug on its biggest profit maker. Paramount executives are unfazed. "I sleep well," says Kerry McCluggage, chairman of Paramount TV Group. And well he should. Paramount believes that in "Star Trek" it has found the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow: an entertainment property suited to endless exploitation. It's the kind of hit every studio dreams of but few can actually claim.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1994 | JAMES GRANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The phone is ringing off the hook and scripts from studios are flooding the Sherman Oaks home office of "Star Trek: Generations" director David Carson, but at the moment, the British-born director is more interested in studying an enormous antique wall clock in the hallway. He crouches down on the ground to show a visitor the very bottom of the impressive timepiece, built in England in 1720. "Look at that," he says, as though looking at the clock for the first time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1994 | JAMES GRANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The phone is ringing off the hook and scripts from studios are flooding the Sherman Oaks home office of "Star Trek: Generations" director David Carson, but at the moment, the British-born director is more interested in studying an enormous antique wall clock in the hallway. He crouches down on the ground to show a visitor the very bottom of the impressive timepiece, built in England in 1720. "Look at that," he says, as though looking at the clock for the first time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it Star Trek: The Generation Gap. From Germany to Granada Hills, "Star Trek" fans are jamming the phone lines to reach Joyce Mason, president of an international William Shatner fan club, protesting what the rumor mill says is the death of their hero, starship Capt. James T. Kirk, in the new "Trek" movie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it Star Trek: The Generation Gap. From Germany to Granada Hills, "Star Trek" fans are jamming the phone lines to reach Joyce Mason, president of an international William Shatner fan club, protesting what the rumor mill says is the death of their hero, starship Capt. James T. Kirk, in the new "Trek" movie.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for The Times
Look to Woody Allen for inspiration. The actor-director and funnyman is the winner of more Academy Awards than he cares to pick up, recognized around the world. And yet every Monday night he's just another clarinet player with a club gig, his fame at least temporarily irrelevant, forgotten. For actor-musician Tim Russ, that escape must be paradise. Not that Russ is a celebrity. At least not until Jan. 16, when he debuts as a Vulcan crew member in the new "Star Trek: Voyager" television series.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leave it to those Trekkies. Sunday night, leaders of five local chapters of the International Federation of Trekkers--using information transmitted through space at the speed of light--were able to view the final episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" the day before it happened! They knew, you see, that studios customarily feed programs early to affiliate stations around the country, so the stations will have time to insert local commercials before the programs are shown.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1994 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the final episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" airs Monday, Paramount Pictures will pull the plug on its biggest profit maker. Paramount executives are unfazed. "I sleep well," says Kerry McCluggage, chairman of Paramount TV Group. And well he should. Paramount believes that in "Star Trek" it has found the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow: an entertainment property suited to endless exploitation. It's the kind of hit every studio dreams of but few can actually claim.
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