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Star Trek Movie

NEWS
August 20, 1998
Paul Gerchik, 85, an artist who turned his talents to camouflage and therapy for wounded soldiers during World War II. Born in New York to immigrant Russian parents, Gerchik studied at the Art Students League. During the Depression, he became a social activist and president of the 1,000-member Artists' Union. He led delegations to Washington, seeking support for poor artists.
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NEWS
October 27, 1994
In the news: Comic Argus Hamilton, on Time magazine's story about public schools: "The cover shows a kid raising his hand in class. That's not how it is today. Shouldn't he be raising both hands?" Comedy writer Bob Mills, on President Clinton's conduct in the Middle East: "He embarrassed Egyptian President Mubarak when he kept asking if he could meet Omar Sharif.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2002 | Gordon Cox, Special to The Times
Brent Spiner's eyes are blue. This may come as a surprise to many people familiar with the actor from his best-known role. It takes yellow contact lenses, not to mention darkened hair and a coat of gold-tinted body paint, to transform Spiner into Data, the inquisitive android from "Star Trek: The Next Generation." Underneath the shiny makeup, Spiner is a versatile actor who has appeared on Broadway in the Stephen Sondheim musical "Sunday in the Park with George," and in "1776."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
It looks like the newest "Star Trek" movie is living long and prospering.  "Star Trek Into Darkness," J.J. Abrams' latest contribution to the venerable franchise, is the bestselling DVD and Blu-ray title and a top rental. The film that made more than $466 million worldwide in theaters was also the top video-on-demand title.  With the fall TV season about to get into full swing, DVD sets of popular series are also populating the bestseller list.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Ahead of its seventh-season premiere Thursday on CBS, the sixth season of "The Big Bang Theory" was the second-biggest seller.  "Now You See Me," Summit Entertainment's film about investigators pursuing a team of illusionist bank robbers, came in at No. 3.  Besides "The Big Bang Theory," other TV shows with seasons debuting in the Top 10 were "Homeland's" second season, "Supernatural's" eighth and "Castle's" fifth.  Here are the top titles for the week that ended Sept.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After all these years, Leonard Nimoy is unsure why "Star Trek" still enthralls. "I've tried to come at that question many times," says the man who was Spock. "There are a lot of factors: hope for the future, mankind survives, the teamwork of the characters, the avoidance of pandering and talking down to the audience, the scientific credibility. It all adds up to an interesting theatrical experience."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2006 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
The opening notes, low and ominous, send a chill up the spine of anyone sitting in a darkened theater. The great white shark is near, cutting through the water in pursuit of its prey. John Williams composed the music and the mounting tension it conveys for the soundtrack of the movie "Jaws." Tuba player Tommy Johnson lifted those relentlessly accelerating notes off the page, giving voice to the shark while bringing terror to the movie audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2013 | By Chris Lee and John Horn
Every filmmaker in Hollywood worth his final cut has a signature visual flourish that functions something like a filmic fingerprint. For Martin Scorsese, it's the long, uninterrupted tracking shot. For John Woo, the balletic deployment of two-handed gun violence. Wes Anderson never met a painterly tableau he didn't like. And Steven Spielberg favors the slow zoom in just about every one of his movies. J.J. Abrams , meanwhile, tends toward a cinematographic trope that looks, at first glance, like a screw-up -- lens flare -- i.e. intentionally flooding the camera frame with light to deliberately wash out or obscure the imagery on-screen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2012
George Murdock Character actor often played the 'heavy' George Murdock, 81, a veteran character actor who had a recurring role as Lt. Scanlon on the television sitcom "Barney Miller" and played God in the 1989 film "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier," died Monday at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, said his close friend and fellow actor Jennifer Rhodes. He had cancer. Murdock's craggy facial features and booming bass voice helped him land a steady stream of "heavy" parts in theater, film and television productions.
REAL ESTATE
July 2, 1989 | JAMES DULLEY
QUESTION: I am on a limited budget and I am interested in building one of those do-it-yourself insulated foam block/concrete houses. How energy-efficient are they and are they easy and inexpensive to build? ANSWER: The new types of foam block/concrete houses are extremely energy-efficient, especially for air conditioning. They are very well-insulated with minimal air leakage and look like any conventionally-built house. The first manufacturers were located in California.
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