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Star Trek The Next Generation Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the death of "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry one year ago, his humanistic vision of the future is being more widely embraced on television than ever before. For the first four weeks of its fall season, "Star Trek: The Next Generation" has finished as the No. 1 original program in syndicated television. That marks the longest period of time that the perennial ratings champ, "Wheel of Fortune," has been locked out of the top spot since the A.C. Nielsen Co.
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NEWS
September 14, 2006 | Alex Chun
With the next "Star Trek" film at least two years off, fans looking for a quick fix should transport themselves over to Christie's Los Angeles, where, through Saturday, they can view the likes of a three-foot-wide model of a Romulan Warbird or a Starfleet uniform worn by Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard. The Warbird and uniforms are among about 30 set and production pieces that have been touring the U.S.
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NEWS
June 24, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Get a life!" The first place where most folks heard that now ubiquitous phrase was on a "Saturday Night Live" episode a few years back, climaxing a skit in which a harried William Shatner at a "Star Trek" convention has finally fielded more fawning trivia questions from fans--Trekkies--than he can stand. Then came those damning words, "Get a life !" This wasn't Trekkies' parents talking, not work-mate infidels, but the very voice of Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995
A periodic actor in television's "Star Trek: The Next Generation" testified Wednesday that a Los Angeles Police Department officer threw him to the ground in the parking garage of his condominium. Joseph Brance, who filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city and two LAPD officers, testified he did nothing to provoke the force used by Officer Stanley Evans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1994 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A star goes nova tonight. The star is "Star Trek: The Next Generation," whose continuing mission--on television, anyway--ends this evening, with the fate of humanity resting in the hands of Capt. Jean-Luc Picard. The syndicated TV series flares out with an epic two-hour finale that hop-scotches through time--from the 24th Century all the way back to the primordial muck of humanity--and then quietly fades to black after seven white-hot seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1993 | RYAN MURPHY
When "Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country" beamed into theaters in late 1991, William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy and all the other principal players involved made one thing perfectly clear: This was the last one. The old crew of the Starship Enterprise may be finished with the movies, but the "Star Trek" movie franchise lives on.
NEWS
September 14, 2006 | Alex Chun
With the next "Star Trek" film at least two years off, fans looking for a quick fix should transport themselves over to Christie's Los Angeles, where, through Saturday, they can view the likes of a three-foot-wide model of a Romulan Warbird or a Starfleet uniform worn by Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard. The Warbird and uniforms are among about 30 set and production pieces that have been touring the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1994 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the final episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" airs Monday, Paramount Pictures will pull the plug on its biggest profit maker. Paramount executives are unfazed. "I sleep well," says Kerry McCluggage, chairman of Paramount TV Group. And well he should. Paramount believes that in "Star Trek" it has found the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow: an entertainment property suited to endless exploitation. It's the kind of hit every studio dreams of but few can actually claim.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word got out in 1968 that the thoughtful but low-rated NBC science-fiction series "Star Trek" would be canceled, a grass-roots letter-writing campaign was organized in support of creator Gene Roddenberry. The result was a fabled 1 million letters to NBC, prompting the network to return the series for another season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995
A periodic actor in television's "Star Trek: The Next Generation" testified Wednesday that a Los Angeles Police Department officer threw him to the ground in the parking garage of his condominium. Joseph Brance, who filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city and two LAPD officers, testified he did nothing to provoke the force used by Officer Stanley Evans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994 | JAIME ABDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some came hoping to catch a glimpse of the Enterprise crew. Other Trekkers were snapping up plastic photon phasers and life-sized posters of Capt. Jean-Luc Picard. Denise Fennell and Roy Henderson came to the Anaheim Convention Center's Star Trek Convention Saturday to show off. They were decked in full Klingon gear--rippled foreheads, long curly hair, silver battle weapons and, of course, spiked knuckle bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leave it to those Trekkies. Sunday night, leaders of five local chapters of the International Federation of Trekkers--using information transmitted through space at the speed of light--were able to view the final episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" the day before it happened! They knew, you see, that studios customarily feed programs early to affiliate stations around the country, so the stations will have time to insert local commercials before the programs are shown.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1994 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A star goes nova tonight. The star is "Star Trek: The Next Generation," whose continuing mission--on television, anyway--ends this evening, with the fate of humanity resting in the hands of Capt. Jean-Luc Picard. The syndicated TV series flares out with an epic two-hour finale that hop-scotches through time--from the 24th Century all the way back to the primordial muck of humanity--and then quietly fades to black after seven white-hot seasons.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1994 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the final episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" airs Monday, Paramount Pictures will pull the plug on its biggest profit maker. Paramount executives are unfazed. "I sleep well," says Kerry McCluggage, chairman of Paramount TV Group. And well he should. Paramount believes that in "Star Trek" it has found the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow: an entertainment property suited to endless exploitation. It's the kind of hit every studio dreams of but few can actually claim.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1993 | RYAN MURPHY
When "Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country" beamed into theaters in late 1991, William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy and all the other principal players involved made one thing perfectly clear: This was the last one. The old crew of the Starship Enterprise may be finished with the movies, but the "Star Trek" movie franchise lives on.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the death of "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry one year ago, his humanistic vision of the future is being more widely embraced on television than ever before. For the first four weeks of its fall season, "Star Trek: The Next Generation" has finished as the No. 1 original program in syndicated television. That marks the longest period of time that the perennial ratings champ, "Wheel of Fortune," has been locked out of the top spot since the A.C. Nielsen Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994 | JAIME ABDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some came hoping to catch a glimpse of the Enterprise crew. Other Trekkers were snapping up plastic photon phasers and life-sized posters of Capt. Jean-Luc Picard. Denise Fennell and Roy Henderson came to the Anaheim Convention Center's Star Trek Convention Saturday to show off. They were decked in full Klingon gear--rippled foreheads, long curly hair, silver battle weapons and, of course, spiked knuckle bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leave it to those Trekkies. Sunday night, leaders of five local chapters of the International Federation of Trekkers--using information transmitted through space at the speed of light--were able to view the final episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" the day before it happened! They knew, you see, that studios customarily feed programs early to affiliate stations around the country, so the stations will have time to insert local commercials before the programs are shown.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Get a life!" The first place where most folks heard that now ubiquitous phrase was on a "Saturday Night Live" episode a few years back, climaxing a skit in which a harried William Shatner at a "Star Trek" convention has finally fielded more fawning trivia questions from fans--Trekkies--than he can stand. Then came those damning words, "Get a life !" This wasn't Trekkies' parents talking, not work-mate infidels, but the very voice of Capt.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word got out in 1968 that the thoughtful but low-rated NBC science-fiction series "Star Trek" would be canceled, a grass-roots letter-writing campaign was organized in support of creator Gene Roddenberry. The result was a fabled 1 million letters to NBC, prompting the network to return the series for another season.
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