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Star Wars Concept

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OPINION
October 6, 1985
Scheer's articles point out the enormous constituency that has formed around the "Star Wars" concept. Not only are the established defense contractors churning out multimillion-dollar proposals as fast as they can, but an entire new type of industry is being born to take advantage of the new arms race bonanza. The gleaming buildings of these new high-technology, high-frontier companies are highly visible in the area surrounding Washington. Regardless of any unlikely benefits to the American public in terms of protection, these politically powerful defense contractors will ensure that the "Star Wars" program has a long and rewarding life, at the great expense of the taxpayer.
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NEWS
March 21, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top-secret flight center on the tawny plains east of the Rockies has become a preferred destination for military commanders who want to learn how to launch missiles capable of blasting enemy warheads from the sky. The sleek computer workstations of the National Test Flight Center command post are not actually connected to real interceptors--because none have been designed yet. Nor have test flights yet proved that any missile will ever be able to knock down another.
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NEWS
May 12, 1989
The Pentagon plans extensive tests this summer on a "Star Wars" concept known as "Brilliant Pebbles" and may incorporate the theory in its plans as early as next fall, a Pentagon official said. Lt. Gen. George L. Monahan Jr., director of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization, said two groups will study the space-based defense concept, in which thousands of satellites designed to knock down enemy missiles orbit the earth. Monahan identified the two groups as the Defense Science Board, a Pentagon committee, and the Jasons, a group of university professors, mostly physicists, retained by the department to conduct independent analysis.
BOOKS
January 3, 1999 | ADAM BRESNICK, Adam Bresnick is a regular contributor to the (London) Times Literary Supplement
Two and a half decades ago, in an entertainment galaxy not so far away, the young George Lucas shopped a grammatically slapdash and orthographically challenged 13-page treatment that would become the "Star Wars" trilogy. Fresh from the commercial triumph of "American Graffiti," which had been made for less than $1 million and had astonished Universal executives by earning over $120 million at the box office, Lucas was chagrined to see his pet proposal rejected by Universal and United Artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1985
President Reagan has sent his arms-control negotiators to Geneva with instructions that amount to sending a chess champion into a match with one or more chess piece than the rules allow. The piece is "Star Wars"--the Strategic Defense Initiative. But it is still in a box, so nobody knows whether it is as powerful as a second queen or as expendable as a ninth pawn. But either it remains a part of the game or, so the President seems to be saying, the match is off.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top-secret flight center on the tawny plains east of the Rockies has become a preferred destination for military commanders who want to learn how to launch missiles capable of blasting enemy warheads from the sky. The sleek computer workstations of the National Test Flight Center command post are not actually connected to real interceptors--because none have been designed yet. Nor have test flights yet proved that any missile will ever be able to knock down another.
NEWS
May 12, 1989
The Pentagon plans extensive tests this summer on a "Star Wars" concept known as "Brilliant Pebbles" and may incorporate the theory in its plans as early as next fall, a Pentagon official said. Lt. Gen. George L. Monahan Jr., director of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization, said two groups will study the space-based defense concept, in which thousands of satellites designed to knock down enemy missiles orbit the earth. Monahan identified the two groups as the Defense Science Board, a Pentagon committee, and the Jasons, a group of university professors, mostly physicists, retained by the department to conduct independent analysis.
OPINION
October 6, 1985
If Teller expects "Star Wars" to be workable and timely many of us have urgent news for him. There is no doubt that Teller and his colleagues have their smarts in physics and computer science, but they know as much about outer space structures as I do about nuclear physics--i.e., very little. To design precision focusing mirrors and the support structure, free of thermal vibrations in space, will be a monumental task. The selection of materials for the support structure, exposed to the space environment for protracted periods of time, is an additional problem.
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